Inequality and essential services blog channel

Bidonville de Mukuru, Nairobi, Kenya. Photo : Eleanor Farmer/Oxfam

It could be the opportunity of a generation.

The world can be proud of the progress made towards ending poverty - as I see for myself when I visit the toughest places, the cynics have been proven wrong by successful efforts to combat disease, to increase access to drinking water sources, and to get girls into school. But, as Oxfam witnesses in work on the ground, and as the expert number-crunchers attest, the completion of this progress is now jeopardized by extreme inequality. 

Overcoming inequality and climate change is key to ending poverty and suffering

Two major injustices – inequality and climate change – are threatening to undermine the efforts of millions of people to escape poverty and hunger. By concentrating wealth and power in the hands of a few, inequality robs the poorest people of the support they need to improve their lives. And as climate change devastates crops and livelihoods, it undoes poor people’s efforts to feed their families.

Africa Rising: Time for a fairer deal for all

I have joined global decision makers in Maputo this week for the IMF and Mozambiquan government’s joint “Africa Rising” conference, to take stock of Africa’s economic performance, resilience and challenges.

Much of Africa’s impressive economic growth over the last decade has been driven by new discoveries of oil, natural gas and mineral reserves. The continent has six of the top 10 fastest growing economies in the world. This growth is worth celebrating.

Universal health coverage: time for an ambitious call for equity in health

People want dignity, people want rights

In the global survey World We Want 2015, health was the first priority of people living in poor countries. This was not surprising. Every year in Africa, nearly a quarter of a million children under five die because their parents cannot afford to pay for treatment. According to the World Health Organization, 150 million people face catastrophic healthcare costs every year, while 100 million are pushed into poverty because of direct payments.

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