rural women

Photo of a woman harvesting potatoes

Blog: Broken promises: rural women hit hardest by corporate land deals

Small-scale women farmers are the backbone of Africa's food system, but, as corporations buy up huge swathes of rural land, they are losing out at every turn. Marc Wegerif introduces a new Oxfam briefing paper, which looks at the great challenges facing women small-scale farmers, and also gives a highlights of Oxfam's Food Heroes who perhaps show us where to go next.

Blog: Transforming economic power to advance women’s rights and justice

The last year’s Arab Spring events have demonstrated the immense power that grassroots organizing, social media, and collective power can have in creating change. We’ve seen revolutions and protests, campaigns and online actions, resonating with greater impact than ever before. Women, and women’s rights organizations, have remained an essential part of the momentum of these movements and activities.

Land grabs stunt in Birmingham. Photo: Oxfam Midlands

Blog: #GROW Week day seven: land grabs

From Uganda to Honduras and Peru to South Sudan - where land is going for as little as 2.5 cents per hectare - irresponsible investors are acquiring land that's classed as 'unused' or 'underdeveloped', but which in many cases is actually being used by poor families to grow food.

It's not necessarily a problem when wealthy companies invest in agricultural land in poor countries for commercial use. But when families are forcibly kicked off the land or less food is grown as a result, that's a very big problem indeed.

Rural Women's Assembly in South Africa. Photo: Oxfam

Blog: #GROW Week day four: climate change

Every day this week, we will look at the issues in the GROW campaign through activities happening around the world.

One of the issues that is featuring in GROW Week campaigns and actions this week is our changing climate. In South Africa and Cambodia, people are making themselves heard about climate change.

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