Food and Gender: Online Discussion blog channel http://l.blogs.oxfam/en/blogs/2261 en Day 10: The Recivilization of Men by Women http://l.blogs.oxfam/en/blogs/recivilization-of-men-by-women <div class="field field-name-blog-main-image-absolute"><a href="http://l.blogs.oxfam/en/blogs/recivilization-of-men-by-women"><div class="field field-name-field-main-blog-image"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://l.blogs.oxfam/sites/default/files/styles/blogmain-list-embed/public/blogimages/main/Photo%203.jpg?itok=U7aTWXTJ" width="210" height="110" alt="Children learning in Tanzania. Image: Oxfam" title="Children learning in Tanzania. Image: Oxfam" /></div></a></div><h3 class="title blog-title"><a href="http://l.blogs.oxfam/en/blogs/recivilization-of-men-by-women"><span class="node-type-icon node-type-blog"></span>Blog: Day 10: The Recivilization of Men by Women</a></h3><div class="field field-name-post-date">30 November 2012</div><div class="field field-name-body"><p><strong><em>The agrarian transition to an input-intensive, capitalized form of agriculture is deeply gendered. Food security depends on combating overt discrimination against women, but this shall only be viable if combined with a redistribution of roles in the household.</em></strong></p> <p>By <a href="http://blogs.oxfam.org/en/user/profile/olivier-de-schutter"><strong>Olivier De Schutter</strong></a>, UN Special Rapporteur on the Right to Food</p></div> Fri, 30 Nov 2012 00:00:01 +0000 Olivier De Schutter 10089 at http://l.blogs.oxfam Day 9: Feminism and Food Sovereignty http://l.blogs.oxfam/en/blogs/feminism-and-food-sovereignty <div class="field field-name-blog-main-image-absolute"><a href="http://l.blogs.oxfam/en/blogs/feminism-and-food-sovereignty"><div class="field field-name-field-main-blog-image"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://l.blogs.oxfam/sites/default/files/styles/blogmain-list-embed/public/blogimages/main/Photo%202_1.jpg?itok=9rc71uuo" width="210" height="110" alt="A small-scale farmer from the Matagalpa region of northeastern Nicaragua. Image: Oxfam" title="A small-scale farmer from the Matagalpa region of northeastern Nicaragua. Image: Oxfam" /></div></a></div><h3 class="title blog-title"><a href="http://l.blogs.oxfam/en/blogs/feminism-and-food-sovereignty"><span class="node-type-icon node-type-blog"></span>Blog: Day 9: Feminism and Food Sovereignty</a></h3><div class="field field-name-post-date">29 November 2012</div><div class="field field-name-body"><p><em><strong>Food sovereignty offers opportunities to advance women’s rights, but we must also work to change gender relations within rural families and within our own movement. Peasant movements such as La Via Campesina must step up to the challenge of linking food sovereignty and feminism.</strong></em></p> <p>By <a href="http://blogs.oxfam.org/en/user/profile/pamela-elisa-caro-molina"><strong>Pamela Elisa Caro Molina</strong></a>, feminist researcher working with CLOC-La Via Campesina</p></div> Thu, 29 Nov 2012 00:10:00 +0000 Pamela Elisa Caro Molina 10086 at http://l.blogs.oxfam Day 9: Nutrition Policies that Work for Women http://l.blogs.oxfam/en/blogs/nutrition-policies-that-work-for-women <div class="field field-name-blog-main-image-absolute"><a href="http://l.blogs.oxfam/en/blogs/nutrition-policies-that-work-for-women"><div class="field field-name-field-main-blog-image"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://l.blogs.oxfam/sites/default/files/styles/blogmain-list-embed/public/blogimages/main/Photo%2011_0.jpg?itok=z_vEaI35" width="210" height="110" alt="Hasina Begum, a woman farmer, in Bangladesh. Image: Oxfam" title="Hasina Begum, a woman farmer, in Bangladesh. Image: Oxfam" /></div></a></div><h3 class="title blog-title"><a href="http://l.blogs.oxfam/en/blogs/nutrition-policies-that-work-for-women"><span class="node-type-icon node-type-blog"></span>Blog: Day 9: Nutrition Policies that Work for Women</a></h3><div class="field field-name-post-date">29 November 2012</div><div class="field field-name-body"><p><strong><em>Almost everywhere and across all age-groups, female nutrition indicators are worse than those of their male counterparts. Gender differences in access to food obviously reflect socio-cultural reali-ties, but are often reinforced by public policies that are either gender-blind or downright discrimina-tory.</em></strong></p> <p>By <a href="http://blogs.oxfam.org/en/user/profile/jayati-ghosh"><strong>Jayati Ghosh</strong></a>, feminist, economist and professor at Jawaharlal Nehru University</p></div> Thu, 29 Nov 2012 00:00:01 +0000 Jayati Ghosh 10081 at http://l.blogs.oxfam Day 8: On the Virtues of Discrimination http://l.blogs.oxfam/en/blogs/virtues-of-discrimination <div class="field field-name-blog-main-image-absolute"><a href="http://l.blogs.oxfam/en/blogs/virtues-of-discrimination"><div class="field field-name-field-main-blog-image"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://l.blogs.oxfam/sites/default/files/styles/blogmain-list-embed/public/blogimages/main/Photo%207.jpg?itok=Q2MDYolp" width="210" height="110" alt="Sisters Kisinyinye and Norkinmunyak Nairiamu working their fields in Tanzania. Image: Oxfam " title="Sisters Kisinyinye and Norkinmunyak Nairiamu working their fields in Tanzania. Image: Oxfam " /></div></a></div><h3 class="title blog-title"><a href="http://l.blogs.oxfam/en/blogs/virtues-of-discrimination"><span class="node-type-icon node-type-blog"></span>Blog: Day 8: On the Virtues of Discrimination</a></h3><div class="field field-name-post-date">28 November 2012</div><div class="field field-name-body"><p><em><strong>All things being equal, countries benefit from more open trade. But all things are not equal. For women, the context is almost always one of inequality. To protect and advance women’s rights, it’s time for trade negotiators to start discriminating.</strong></em></p> <p>By <a href="http://blogs.oxfam.org/en/user/profile/sophia-murphy"><strong>Sophia Murphy</strong></a>, senior advisor to the Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy</p></div> Wed, 28 Nov 2012 00:00:01 +0000 Sophia Murphy 10076 at http://l.blogs.oxfam Day 7: Seeds and Sisterhood http://l.blogs.oxfam/en/blogs/seeds-and-sisterhood <div class="field field-name-blog-main-image-absolute"><a href="http://l.blogs.oxfam/en/blogs/seeds-and-sisterhood"><div class="field field-name-field-main-blog-image"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://l.blogs.oxfam/sites/default/files/styles/blogmain-list-embed/public/blogimages/main/Photo%2013_0.jpg?itok=ZhYrlwpZ" width="210" height="110" alt="Jean Phombeya and her seeds in Malawi. Image: Oxfam" title="Jean Phombeya and her seeds in Malawi. Image: Oxfam" /></div></a></div><h3 class="title blog-title"><a href="http://l.blogs.oxfam/en/blogs/seeds-and-sisterhood"><span class="node-type-icon node-type-blog"></span>Blog: Day 7: Seeds and Sisterhood</a></h3><div class="field field-name-post-date">27 November 2012</div><div class="field field-name-body"><p><strong><em>Governments and development agencies need to shift the onus of feeding the world away from time-strapped impoverished women, and instead support their organizing and cultivate their traditional knowledge. We also need to rethink women’s unpaid care work and lack of time as fundamental issues of food security.</em></strong></p> <p>By <a href="http://blogs.oxfam.org/en/user/profile/joanna-kerr"><strong>Joanna Kerr</strong></a>, CEO of ActionAid International</p></div> Tue, 27 Nov 2012 00:00:01 +0000 Joanna Kerr 10073 at http://l.blogs.oxfam Day 6: Stop Talking About Equality http://l.blogs.oxfam/en/blogs/stop-talking-about-equality <div class="field field-name-blog-main-image-absolute"><a href="http://l.blogs.oxfam/en/blogs/stop-talking-about-equality"><div class="field field-name-field-main-blog-image"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://l.blogs.oxfam/sites/default/files/styles/blogmain-list-embed/public/blogimages/main/Photo%205.jpg?itok=RGC5IMaH" width="210" height="110" alt="Girls getting essential services. Image: Oxfam" title="Girls getting essential services. Image: Oxfam" /></div></a></div><h3 class="title blog-title"><a href="http://l.blogs.oxfam/en/blogs/stop-talking-about-equality"><span class="node-type-icon node-type-blog"></span>Blog: Day 6: Stop Talking About Equality</a></h3><div class="field field-name-post-date">26 November 2012</div><div class="field field-name-body"><p><em><strong>Business leaders change behavior when something is in it for them and their companies. If we want them to change the way they do business, we need to stop talking about justice and gender equality, and instead show how a fairer food system means sustainable profits.</strong></em></p> <p>By <a href="http://blogs.oxfam.org/en/user/profile/tinna-c-nielsen"><strong>Tinna Nielsen</strong></a>, senior diversity and inclusion consultant<strong></strong></p></div> Mon, 26 Nov 2012 00:00:01 +0000 Tinna C. Nielsen 10410 at http://l.blogs.oxfam Day 5: Time for a New Recipe http://l.blogs.oxfam/en/blogs/time-for-a-new-recipe <div class="field field-name-blog-main-image-absolute"><a href="http://l.blogs.oxfam/en/blogs/time-for-a-new-recipe"><div class="field field-name-field-main-blog-image"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://l.blogs.oxfam/sites/default/files/styles/blogmain-list-embed/public/blogimages/main/Photo%201.jpg?itok=l2oMvgAT" width="210" height="110" alt="Women collecting water in Uganda. Image: Oxfam" title="Women collecting water in Uganda. Image: Oxfam" /></div></a></div><h3 class="title blog-title"><a href="http://l.blogs.oxfam/en/blogs/time-for-a-new-recipe"><span class="node-type-icon node-type-blog"></span>Blog: Day 5: Time for a New Recipe </a></h3><div class="field field-name-post-date">23 November 2012</div><div class="field field-name-body"><p><strong><em>The women’s movement hasn’t been proactive about defining its own platform for action on food justice, and we are noticeably absent from spaces where decisions are made. We need to break out of our silos, strengthen our technical expertise, and start shaping the political process rather than stand on the sidelines.</em></strong></p> <p>by <a href="http://blogs.oxfam.org/en/user/profile/alexandra-spieldoch"><strong>Alexandra Spieldoch</strong></a>, women's rights activist, formerly with WOCAN<strong></strong></p></div> Fri, 23 Nov 2012 00:00:01 +0000 Alexandra Spieldoch 10064 at http://l.blogs.oxfam Day 4: Women Farm Workers Dying for Food http://l.blogs.oxfam/en/blogs/women-farm-workers-dying-food <div class="field field-name-blog-main-image-absolute"><a href="http://l.blogs.oxfam/en/blogs/women-farm-workers-dying-food"><div class="field field-name-field-main-blog-image"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://l.blogs.oxfam/sites/default/files/styles/blogmain-list-embed/public/blogimages/main/South%20Africa.jpg?itok=JpK1SnyY" width="210" height="110" alt="A woman working on a farm in Stellenbosch, South Africa. Image: Oxfam" title="A woman working on a farm in Stellenbosch, South Africa. Image: Oxfam" /></div></a></div><h3 class="title blog-title"><a href="http://l.blogs.oxfam/en/blogs/women-farm-workers-dying-food"><span class="node-type-icon node-type-blog"></span>Blog: Day 4: Women Farm Workers Dying for Food</a></h3><div class="field field-name-post-date">22 November 2012</div><div class="field field-name-body"><p><em><strong>One of the ultimate perversities of our era is that the producers of food and their children often go to bed hungry. Reform of commercial agriculture is urgent if the women farm workers who grow and pack our food are to have enough to eat.</strong></em></p> <p>By <a href="http://blogs.oxfam.org/en/user/profile/fatima-shabodien"><strong>Fatima Shabodien</strong></a>, former Director of the Women on Farms Project</p></div> Thu, 22 Nov 2012 00:00:01 +0000 Fatima Shabodien 10060 at http://l.blogs.oxfam Day 3: Seeds in Women’s Hands http://l.blogs.oxfam/en/blogs/seeds-in-womens-hands <div class="field field-name-blog-main-image-absolute"><a href="http://l.blogs.oxfam/en/blogs/seeds-in-womens-hands"><div class="field field-name-field-main-blog-image"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://l.blogs.oxfam/sites/default/files/styles/blogmain-list-embed/public/blogimages/main/Photo%204.jpg?itok=SeB92y2u" width="210" height="110" alt="Learning at Apna Kendra bridge school for working children in India. Image: Oxfam" title="Learning at Apna Kendra bridge school for working children in India. Image: Oxfam" /></div></a></div><h3 class="title blog-title"><a href="http://l.blogs.oxfam/en/blogs/seeds-in-womens-hands"><span class="node-type-icon node-type-blog"></span>Blog: Day 3: Seeds in Women’s Hands </a></h3><div class="field field-name-post-date">21 November 2012</div><div class="field field-name-body"><p><em><strong>Seeds are the first link in the food chain. Yet women seed breeders are invisible in the industrial model of food production and in intellectual property regimes. The roots of food and gender justice lie in keeping seeds in women’s hands and recognizing women’s knowledge of biodiversity.</strong></em></p> <p>by <a href="http://blogs.oxfam.org/en/user/profile/dr-vandana-shiva"><strong>Vandana Shiva</strong></a>, philosopher, feminist and environmental activist</p></div> Wed, 21 Nov 2012 00:00:01 +0000 Dr. Vandana Shiva 10051 at http://l.blogs.oxfam Day 2: The Potential of Women Suppliers http://l.blogs.oxfam/en/blogs/potential-of-women-suppliers <div class="field field-name-blog-main-image-absolute"><a href="http://l.blogs.oxfam/en/blogs/potential-of-women-suppliers"><div class="field field-name-field-main-blog-image"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://l.blogs.oxfam/sites/default/files/styles/blogmain-list-embed/public/blogimages/main/Photo%209.jpg?itok=jeOt6g15" width="210" height="110" alt="Women and their role in the agricultural value chain. Image: Oxfam" title="Women and their role in the agricultural value chain. Image: Oxfam" /></div></a></div><h3 class="title blog-title"><a href="http://l.blogs.oxfam/en/blogs/potential-of-women-suppliers"><span class="node-type-icon node-type-blog"></span>Blog: Day 2: The Potential of Women Suppliers </a></h3><div class="field field-name-post-date">20 November 2012</div><div class="field field-name-body"><p><em><strong>Food system transformation will require the engagement of women suppliers along entire agricultural value chains. Women need to shift out of labour into business ownership, and women suppliers need to get organized to have access to actual buyers. </strong></em></p> <p>By <a href="http://blogs.oxfam.org/en/user/profile/elizabeth-vazquez"><strong>Elizabeth Vazquez</strong></a>, CEO of WEConnect International<strong></strong></p></div> Tue, 20 Nov 2012 00:00:01 +0000 Elizabeth Vazquez 10054 at http://l.blogs.oxfam Day 1: Changing Value Systems, One Village at a Time http://l.blogs.oxfam/en/blogs/changing-value-systems-one-village-time <div class="field field-name-blog-main-image-absolute"><a href="http://l.blogs.oxfam/en/blogs/changing-value-systems-one-village-time"><div class="field field-name-field-main-blog-image"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://l.blogs.oxfam/sites/default/files/styles/blogmain-list-embed/public/blogimages/main/Photo%206.jpg?itok=SjC5gj9r" width="210" height="110" alt="Desta Yirsa, a farmer in Ethiopia. Image: Oxfam" title="Desta Yirsa, a farmer in Ethiopia. Image: Oxfam" /></div></a></div><h3 class="title blog-title"><a href="http://l.blogs.oxfam/en/blogs/changing-value-systems-one-village-time"><span class="node-type-icon node-type-blog"></span>Blog: Day 1: Changing Value Systems, One Village at a Time</a></h3><div class="field field-name-post-date">19 November 2012</div><div class="field field-name-body"><p><em><strong>If in the course of earning income women farmers are systematically exploited, have their control over what is grown and how taken away from them, and are left with a denuded natural environs, then this is a heavy price to pay for so-called empowerment.</strong></em></p> <p><em><strong></strong></em>By <a href="http://blogs.oxfam.org/en/user/profile/nidhi-tandon"><strong>Nidhi Tandon</strong></a>, activist and Director of Networked Intelligence for Development</p></div> Mon, 19 Nov 2012 05:00:01 +0000 Nidhi Tandon 10052 at http://l.blogs.oxfam