Future of Agriculture: Online Discussion blog channel http://l.blogs.oxfam/en/blogs/2320 en Day 10: Levelling the Plowing Field, Creating Choice http://l.blogs.oxfam/en/blogs/12-12-21-day-10-levelling-the-plowing-field <div class="field field-name-blog-main-image-absolute"><a href="http://l.blogs.oxfam/en/blogs/12-12-21-day-10-levelling-the-plowing-field"><div class="field field-name-field-main-blog-image"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://l.blogs.oxfam/sites/default/files/styles/blogmain-list-embed/public/blogimages/main/23.%20Roger%20Thurow-%20children%20in%20a%20classroom%2C%20Mali.JPG?itok=hCCfcSax" width="210" height="110" alt="Children in a classroom, Mali. Photo: Oxfam" title="Children in a classroom, Mali" /></div></a></div><h3 class="title blog-title"><a href="http://l.blogs.oxfam/en/blogs/12-12-21-day-10-levelling-the-plowing-field"><span class="node-type-icon node-type-blog"></span>Blog: Day 10: Levelling the Plowing Field, Creating Choice</a></h3><div class="field field-name-post-date">20 December 2012</div><div class="field field-name-body"><p><strong><em>Let’s not be dogmatic about farming methods, many options are needed. Options are precisely what smallholders lack. At best these farmers live imprisoned in “either/or” lives filled with heart-wrenching choices. The rich world must foster equal access to farming essentials and above all choice, for smallholders are indispensable to the future of agriculture. </em></strong></p></div> Thu, 20 Dec 2012 23:02:00 +0000 Roger Thurow 10178 at http://l.blogs.oxfam Day 10: Should agriculture as we know it have a future? http://l.blogs.oxfam/en/blogs/12-12-21-should-agriculture-we-know-it-have-future <div class="field field-name-blog-main-image-absolute"><a href="http://l.blogs.oxfam/en/blogs/12-12-21-should-agriculture-we-know-it-have-future"><div class="field field-name-field-main-blog-image"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://l.blogs.oxfam/sites/default/files/styles/blogmain-list-embed/public/blogimages/main/22.%20Sonali%209036.jpg?itok=GCQFCiYP" width="210" height="110" alt="Child running through a rice paddy" title="Child running through a rice paddy" /></div></a></div><h3 class="title blog-title"><a href="http://l.blogs.oxfam/en/blogs/12-12-21-should-agriculture-we-know-it-have-future"><span class="node-type-icon node-type-blog"></span>Blog: Day 10: Should agriculture as we know it have a future?</a></h3><div class="field field-name-post-date">20 December 2012</div><div class="field field-name-body"><p><em><strong>The consumer is king in agriculture. Until aware consumers change their behaviour, the smallholder farmer will get good words, symbolic gestures, and little else. Consumers need to meet producers halfway by paying a fair price and sharing the risk.</strong></em> </p> <p><em>By <strong><a href="http://blogs.oxfam.org/en/user/profile/sonali-bisht">Sonali Bisht</a></strong>, founder of INHERE (India)</em></p></div> Thu, 20 Dec 2012 23:00:01 +0000 Sonali Bisht 10179 at http://l.blogs.oxfam Day 9: Too Few Farmers: A view from the United States http://l.blogs.oxfam/en/blogs/12-12-20-day-9-too-few-farmers-view-united-states <div class="field field-name-blog-main-image-absolute"><a href="http://l.blogs.oxfam/en/blogs/12-12-20-day-9-too-few-farmers-view-united-states"><div class="field field-name-field-main-blog-image"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://l.blogs.oxfam/sites/default/files/styles/blogmain-list-embed/public/blogimages/main/21%20OGorman.jpg?itok=uht9uU_A" width="210" height="110" alt="Empty classroom, Mali. Image: Oxfam" title="Empty classroom, Mali. Image: Oxfam" /></div></a></div><h3 class="title blog-title"><a href="http://l.blogs.oxfam/en/blogs/12-12-20-day-9-too-few-farmers-view-united-states"><span class="node-type-icon node-type-blog"></span>Blog: Day 9: Too Few Farmers: A view from the United States</a></h3><div class="field field-name-post-date">19 December 2012</div><div class="field field-name-body"><p><strong>Every perceived ill of US farming boils down to too few farmers working to feed too many people. The challenge is to get more young people farming, and help them through the early years when they must focus on learning their craft.</strong></p> <p><em>By Michael O’Gorman. Founder of the <a href="http://www.farmvetco.org/" rel="nofollow"><strong>Farmer Veteran Coalition</strong></a></em></p></div> Wed, 19 Dec 2012 23:04:00 +0000 Michael O’Gorman 10171 at http://l.blogs.oxfam Day 9: Who Will Feed Us All? http://l.blogs.oxfam/en/blogs/12-12-20-day-9-who-will-feed-us-all <div class="field field-name-blog-main-image-absolute"><a href="http://l.blogs.oxfam/en/blogs/12-12-20-day-9-who-will-feed-us-all"><div class="field field-name-field-main-blog-image"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://l.blogs.oxfam/sites/default/files/styles/blogmain-list-embed/public/blogimages/main/21.%20Pat%20mooney%20porridge%20somalia.JPG?itok=sPagtGGn" width="210" height="110" alt=" Cooking porridge, Somalia " title="Cooking porridge, Somalia" /></div></a></div><h3 class="title blog-title"><a href="http://l.blogs.oxfam/en/blogs/12-12-20-day-9-who-will-feed-us-all"><span class="node-type-icon node-type-blog"></span>Blog: Day 9: Who Will Feed Us All?</a></h3><div class="field field-name-post-date">19 December 2012</div><div class="field field-name-body"><p><em><strong>If we are to survive climate change, we must adopt policies that let peasants diversify the plant and animal varieties on our menus. Only they have the know-how and patience to find out what plants and livestock will thrive where. A fundamental change in the regulatory machinery is needed.</strong></em></p> <p><em>By Pat Mooney, Co-founder and executive director of the <strong><a href="http://www.etcgroup.org" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">ETC Group</a></strong></em></p></div> Wed, 19 Dec 2012 23:00:01 +0000 Pat Mooney 10172 at http://l.blogs.oxfam Day 8: The Future is Already Here http://l.blogs.oxfam/en/blogs/12-12-19-day-8-future-already-here <div class="field field-name-blog-main-image-absolute"><a href="http://l.blogs.oxfam/en/blogs/12-12-19-day-8-future-already-here"><div class="field field-name-field-main-blog-image"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://l.blogs.oxfam/sites/default/files/styles/blogmain-list-embed/public/blogimages/main/19%20Kavita%20.jpg?itok=HQVjlXoo" width="210" height="110" alt="Member of Dilokata farmers group in her garden in Bito village, Uganda. Photo: Oxfam" title="Member of Dilokata farmers group in her garden in Bito village, Uganda." /></div></a></div><h3 class="title blog-title"><a href="http://l.blogs.oxfam/en/blogs/12-12-19-day-8-future-already-here"><span class="node-type-icon node-type-blog"></span>Blog: Day 8: The Future is Already Here</a></h3><div class="field field-name-post-date">18 December 2012</div><div class="field field-name-body"><p><em><strong>The future has arrived, it’s just not at the scale required. The spread of bottom-up approaches to farmer innovation, coupled with breakthrough technology developed by input companies, will make smallholders productive and profitable. Crucially, new technologies must be accessible, appropriate and affordable.</strong></em></p> <p><em>By Kavita Prakash-Mani, Head of Food Security Agenda, <strong><a href="http://www.syngenta.com/global/corporate/en/Pages/home.aspx" rel="nofollow">Syngenta International</a></strong></em></p></div> Tue, 18 Dec 2012 23:02:00 +0000 Kavita Prakash-Mani 10167 at http://l.blogs.oxfam Day 8: Frame new ideas within indigenous knowledge http://l.blogs.oxfam/en/blogs/12-12-19-day-8-frame-new-ideas-within-indigenous-knowledge <div class="field field-name-blog-main-image-absolute"><a href="http://l.blogs.oxfam/en/blogs/12-12-19-day-8-frame-new-ideas-within-indigenous-knowledge"><div class="field field-name-field-main-blog-image"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://l.blogs.oxfam/sites/default/files/styles/blogmain-list-embed/public/blogimages/main/sahel-man_0.jpg?itok=vZUn9g-V" width="210" height="110" alt="A man from the Sahel. Photo: Oxfam" title="A man from the Sahel." /></div></a></div><h3 class="title blog-title"><a href="http://l.blogs.oxfam/en/blogs/12-12-19-day-8-frame-new-ideas-within-indigenous-knowledge"><span class="node-type-icon node-type-blog"></span>Blog: Day 8: Frame new ideas within indigenous knowledge</a></h3><div class="field field-name-post-date">18 December 2012</div><div class="field field-name-body"><p><em><strong>Experts’ ideas about how resource-poor farmers could improve productivity ought to be guided by indigenous knowledge. Low-cost, micro-innovations that make use of local resources have great potential but are often overlooked by mainstream developers of agricultural technology.</strong></em></p> <p><em>By Dr. Florence Wambugu, CEO, <strong><a href="http://africaharvest.org/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Africa Harvest Biotech Foundation International</a></strong> (AHBFI)</em></p></div> Tue, 18 Dec 2012 23:01:00 +0000 Dr. Florence Wambugu 10162 at http://l.blogs.oxfam Day 7: Working harder isn’t working http://l.blogs.oxfam/en/blogs/12-12-18-day-7-working-harder-isnt-working <div class="field field-name-blog-main-image-absolute"><a href="http://l.blogs.oxfam/en/blogs/12-12-18-day-7-working-harder-isnt-working"><div class="field field-name-field-main-blog-image"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://l.blogs.oxfam/sites/default/files/styles/blogmain-list-embed/public/blogimages/main/17%20Rokeya%20Kabir%20.jpg?itok=3041nuIY" width="210" height="110" alt="Bangladeshi women filling their water cans " title="Bangladeshi women filling their water cans " /></div></a></div><h3 class="title blog-title"><a href="http://l.blogs.oxfam/en/blogs/12-12-18-day-7-working-harder-isnt-working"><span class="node-type-icon node-type-blog"></span>Blog: Day 7: Working harder isn’t working</a></h3><div class="field field-name-post-date">17 December 2012</div><div class="field field-name-body"><p><em><strong>Striving to produce ever more food is the wrong starting point for achieving food security. Instead, let’s focus on reducing inequalities by giving small-scale farmers’ more control, valuing their knowledge, and removing barriers that hamper women’s ability to farm on equal terms.</strong></em></p> <p><em>By Rokeya Kabir, Executive Director of <strong><a href="http://bnps.org/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Bangladesh Nari Progati Sangha</a></strong> (BNPS)</em></p></div> Mon, 17 Dec 2012 23:04:00 +0000 Rokeya Kabir 10157 at http://l.blogs.oxfam Day 7: Farmers do not come from Mars http://l.blogs.oxfam/en/blogs/12-12-18-day-7-farmers-do-not-come-mars <div class="field field-name-blog-main-image-absolute"><a href="http://l.blogs.oxfam/en/blogs/12-12-18-day-7-farmers-do-not-come-mars"><div class="field field-name-field-main-blog-image"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://l.blogs.oxfam/sites/default/files/styles/blogmain-list-embed/public/blogimages/main/16Julio%20Berdegue.JPG?itok=VP_tMXbb" width="210" height="110" alt="Man with his packed donkey in Kosht epa valley, Afghanistan" title="Man with his packed donkey in Kosht epa valley, Afghanistan" /></div></a></div><h3 class="title blog-title"><a href="http://l.blogs.oxfam/en/blogs/12-12-18-day-7-farmers-do-not-come-mars"><span class="node-type-icon node-type-blog"></span>Blog: Day 7: Farmers do not come from Mars</a></h3><div class="field field-name-post-date">17 December 2012</div><div class="field field-name-body"><p><em><strong>If poor farmers had more freedom to innovate and adequate access to public and private investments, they would likely disappoint us by getting out of farming altogether. But even if only one or two in five remained, they would change the world for the better, literally.</strong></em></p> <p><em>By Julio A. Berdegué, Principal Researcher,<strong><a href="http://www.rimisp.org/inicio/about_rimisp.php" target="_blank" rel="nofollow"> Latin American Centre for Rural Development</a></strong> (RIMISP)</em></p></div> Mon, 17 Dec 2012 23:00:01 +0000 Dr. Julio A. Berdegué 10161 at http://l.blogs.oxfam Day 6: The Future of Agriculture is the Future of Mother Earth http://l.blogs.oxfam/en/blogs/12-12-17-day-6-future-agriculture-future-mother-earth <div class="field field-name-blog-main-image-absolute"><a href="http://l.blogs.oxfam/en/blogs/12-12-17-day-6-future-agriculture-future-mother-earth"><div class="field field-name-field-main-blog-image"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://l.blogs.oxfam/sites/default/files/styles/blogmain-list-embed/public/blogimages/main/15%20Tarcila%20Rivera.jpg?itok=wQqgnTiC" width="210" height="110" alt="Corn, Bolivia" title="Corn, Bolivia" /></div></a></div><h3 class="title blog-title"><a href="http://l.blogs.oxfam/en/blogs/12-12-17-day-6-future-agriculture-future-mother-earth"><span class="node-type-icon node-type-blog"></span>Blog: Day 6: The Future of Agriculture is the Future of Mother Earth</a></h3><div class="field field-name-post-date">16 December 2012</div><div class="field field-name-body"><p><em><strong>Nothing is as ironic as the fact that we indigenous peoples, who brought so many foods to the world, lack the means to escape poverty and malnutrition. Having control over what we produce, how and when we do it, and power over its distribution will allow us to build sustainable livelihoods. We call that food sovereignty.</strong></em></p> <p><em>By Tarcila Rivera Zea, Director of the Centre for Peru’s Indigenous Cultures (<a href="http://www.chirapaq.org.pe/" rel="nofollow"><strong>CHIRAPAQ</strong></a>)</em></p></div> Sun, 16 Dec 2012 23:40:01 +0000 Tarcila Rivera Zea 10153 at http://l.blogs.oxfam Day 6: Gender Equality: It’s smart and it’s right http://l.blogs.oxfam/en/blogs/12-12-17-day-6-gender-equality-smart-and-right <div class="field field-name-blog-main-image-absolute"><a href="http://l.blogs.oxfam/en/blogs/12-12-17-day-6-gender-equality-smart-and-right"><div class="field field-name-field-main-blog-image"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://l.blogs.oxfam/sites/default/files/styles/blogmain-list-embed/public/blogimages/main/14%20Niasse.JPG?itok=gI5My_47" width="210" height="110" alt="Young women in Senegal" title="Young women in Senegal" /></div></a></div><h3 class="title blog-title"><a href="http://l.blogs.oxfam/en/blogs/12-12-17-day-6-gender-equality-smart-and-right"><span class="node-type-icon node-type-blog"></span>Blog: Day 6: Gender Equality: It’s smart and it’s right</a></h3><div class="field field-name-post-date">16 December 2012</div><div class="field field-name-body"><p><strong><em>While farming is increasingly reliant on women’s labour, women’s lack of secure land tenure severely limits their influence over farming decisions. Closing the gender gap in land rights would increase productivity and total output. And it would help women exercise their rights as citizens.</em></strong></p> <p><em>By Madiodio Niasse, Secretariat Director, <a href="http://www.landcoalition.org/" rel="nofollow"><strong>International Land Coalition</strong></a> (ILC) </em></p></div> Sun, 16 Dec 2012 23:02:00 +0000 Dr. Madiodio Niasse 10155 at http://l.blogs.oxfam Day 6: Growing a More Food-Secure World http://l.blogs.oxfam/en/blogs/12-12-17-day-6-growing-more-food-secure-world <div class="field field-name-blog-main-image-absolute"><a href="http://l.blogs.oxfam/en/blogs/12-12-17-day-6-growing-more-food-secure-world"><div class="field field-name-field-main-blog-image"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://l.blogs.oxfam/sites/default/files/styles/blogmain-list-embed/public/blogimages/main/13.%20Poelma%20.jpg?itok=fVUhrntm" width="210" height="110" alt="Woman filling a jerry can with water, Tanzania" title="Woman filling a jerry can with water, Tanzania" /></div></a></div><h3 class="title blog-title"><a href="http://l.blogs.oxfam/en/blogs/12-12-17-day-6-growing-more-food-secure-world"><span class="node-type-icon node-type-blog"></span>Blog: Day 6: Growing a More Food-Secure World </a></h3><div class="field field-name-post-date">16 December 2012</div><div class="field field-name-body"><p><strong><em>An agriculture that is resilient and sustainable, and provides sufficient safe, affordable food for all, will be built on four cornerstones: comparative advantage, open trade, markets that work for both producers and consumers, and an African continent that contributes positively to food production.</em></strong></p> <p><em>By Harold Poelma, Managing Director of<strong> <a href="http://www.cargill.com/worldwide/index.jsp" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Cargill Refined Oils Europe</a></strong></em></p></div> Sun, 16 Dec 2012 23:00:01 +0000 Harold Poelma 10147 at http://l.blogs.oxfam Day 5: Private vs. Community: a view from the Peruvian Andes http://l.blogs.oxfam/en/blogs/12-12-14-day-5-private-vs-community-view-peruvian-andes <div class="field field-name-blog-main-image-absolute"><a href="http://l.blogs.oxfam/en/blogs/12-12-14-day-5-private-vs-community-view-peruvian-andes"><div class="field field-name-field-main-blog-image"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://l.blogs.oxfam/sites/default/files/styles/blogmain-list-embed/public/blogimages/main/46897scr-peru-620x350.jpg?itok=tIfU2wTz" width="210" height="110" alt="Milagros Villagas Nima, 17, picks corn in her back yard, Tambogrande, Peru. Photo: Gilvan Barreto/Oxfam" title="Milagros Villagas Nima, 17, picks corn in her back yard, Tambogrande, Peru." /></div></a></div><h3 class="title blog-title"><a href="http://l.blogs.oxfam/en/blogs/12-12-14-day-5-private-vs-community-view-peruvian-andes"><span class="node-type-icon node-type-blog"></span>Blog: Day 5: Private vs. Community: a view from the Peruvian Andes</a></h3><div class="field field-name-post-date">13 December 2012</div><div class="field field-name-body"><p><em><strong>Indigenous farming could become a motor for conserving biodiversity, promoting ancestral knowledge crucial for climate adaptation, and building alternative development models based on local markets. That is, if communities can hold the water-hogging mining companies at bay.</strong></em></p> <p>By Alexis Nicolás Ibáñez Blancas, Researcher at Universidad Nacional Agraria La Molina </p></div> Thu, 13 Dec 2012 23:00:30 +0000 Alexis Nicolás Ibáñez Blancas 10139 at http://l.blogs.oxfam Day 5: My daughter wants to be a farmer http://l.blogs.oxfam/en/blogs/12-12-14-day-5-help-my-daughter-wants-be-farmer <div class="field field-name-blog-main-image-absolute"><a href="http://l.blogs.oxfam/en/blogs/12-12-14-day-5-help-my-daughter-wants-be-farmer"><div class="field field-name-field-main-blog-image"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://l.blogs.oxfam/sites/default/files/styles/blogmain-list-embed/public/blogimages/main/11.%20Godwin%20goed.jpg?itok=QSx8AC4J" width="210" height="110" alt="Two young students in Benin " title="Two young students in Benin " /></div></a></div><h3 class="title blog-title"><a href="http://l.blogs.oxfam/en/blogs/12-12-14-day-5-help-my-daughter-wants-be-farmer"><span class="node-type-icon node-type-blog"></span>Blog: Day 5: My daughter wants to be a farmer</a></h3><div class="field field-name-post-date">13 December 2012</div><div class="field field-name-body"><p><em><strong>Many and varied are the challenges we Nigerian women farmers face, from lack of land to uncertain markets to the daily burden of maintaining the household. Working as day labourers brings its own uncertainties. No wonder a future in agriculture is unattractive to Nigerian youth.</strong></em></p> <p>By Susan Godwin, Nigerian Farmer</p></div> Thu, 13 Dec 2012 23:00:20 +0000 Susan Godwin 10144 at http://l.blogs.oxfam Day 5: Group Mutuality Paves the Way to a Sustainable Future for Smallholders http://l.blogs.oxfam/en/blogs/12-12-14-day-5-group-mutuality-paves-way-sustainable-future-smallholders <div class="field field-name-blog-main-image-absolute"><a href="http://l.blogs.oxfam/en/blogs/12-12-14-day-5-group-mutuality-paves-way-sustainable-future-smallholders"><div class="field field-name-field-main-blog-image"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://l.blogs.oxfam/sites/default/files/styles/blogmain-list-embed/public/blogimages/main/10%20Nicko_Debenham.jpg?itok=3B20L53_" width="210" height="110" alt="Farmers listen to a lecture on sustainable farming techniques, Nigeria. Image: Oxfam" title="Farmers listen to a lecture on sustainable farming techniques, Nigeria. Image: Oxfam" /></div></a></div><h3 class="title blog-title"><a href="http://l.blogs.oxfam/en/blogs/12-12-14-day-5-group-mutuality-paves-way-sustainable-future-smallholders"><span class="node-type-icon node-type-blog"></span>Blog: Day 5: Group Mutuality Paves the Way to a Sustainable Future for Smallholders</a></h3><div class="field field-name-post-date">13 December 2012</div><div class="field field-name-body"><p><em><strong>The fundamental problem for both female and male smallholders is the size of their farms. They are simply too small to generate an acceptable livelihood. An incorporated farm model could overcome many of the current obstacles and be the farming system of the future.</strong></em></p> <p><em>By Nicko Debenham, Director, Development &amp; Sustainability at <strong><a href="http://www.armajarotrading.com/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">Armajaro Trading Ltd.</a></strong></em></p></div> Thu, 13 Dec 2012 23:00:01 +0000 Nicko Debenham 10140 at http://l.blogs.oxfam Day 4: Sustainable food production promotes healthy food and healthy living http://l.blogs.oxfam/en/blogs/12-12-13-day-4-sustainable-food-production-promotes-healthy-food-and-healthy-living <div class="field field-name-blog-main-image-absolute"><a href="http://l.blogs.oxfam/en/blogs/12-12-13-day-4-sustainable-food-production-promotes-healthy-food-and-healthy-living"><div class="field field-name-field-main-blog-image"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://l.blogs.oxfam/sites/default/files/styles/blogmain-list-embed/public/blogimages/main/9.%20sarojeni.jpg?itok=kH01DVzY" width="210" height="110" alt="Farmer, is selling her products at Kungyangone market. Image: Oxfam" title="Farmer, is selling her products at Kungyangone market. Image: Oxfam" /></div></a></div><h3 class="title blog-title"><a href="http://l.blogs.oxfam/en/blogs/12-12-13-day-4-sustainable-food-production-promotes-healthy-food-and-healthy-living"><span class="node-type-icon node-type-blog"></span>Blog: Day 4: Sustainable food production promotes healthy food and healthy living </a></h3><div class="field field-name-post-date">12 December 2012</div><div class="field field-name-body"><p><em><strong>The challenges faced by biodiversity-based ecological agriculture are not primarily technical but political. Evidence from three countries shows farming without fossil fuels works. But such methods will only be adopted widely once we prevail over the political power of agribusiness.</strong></em></p> <p>By Sarojeni V. Rengam, Executive Director of the Pesticide Network Asia and the Pacific.</p></div> Wed, 12 Dec 2012 23:00:20 +0000 Sarojeni V. Rengam 10135 at http://l.blogs.oxfam Day 4: Energy Efficiency and Diversification can Increase Access to Energy and Food Security http://l.blogs.oxfam/en/blogs/12-12-13-day-4-energy-efficiency-diversification-increase-access-energy-food-security <div class="field field-name-blog-main-image-absolute"><a href="http://l.blogs.oxfam/en/blogs/12-12-13-day-4-energy-efficiency-diversification-increase-access-energy-food-security"><div class="field field-name-field-main-blog-image"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://l.blogs.oxfam/sites/default/files/styles/blogmain-list-embed/public/blogimages/main/8.%20Da_Silva.jpg?itok=sDInRzJT" width="210" height="110" alt="A woman hand watering her onion patch with a watering can. Image: Oxfam" title="A woman hand watering her onion patch with a watering can. Image: Oxfam" /></div></a></div><h3 class="title blog-title"><a href="http://l.blogs.oxfam/en/blogs/12-12-13-day-4-energy-efficiency-diversification-increase-access-energy-food-security"><span class="node-type-icon node-type-blog"></span>Blog: Day 4: Energy Efficiency and Diversification can Increase Access to Energy and Food Security</a></h3><div class="field field-name-post-date">12 December 2012</div><div class="field field-name-body"><p><em><strong>Agriculture that uses less fossil fuel must be pursued actively. Renewable fuels, reduced waste and losses, and energy from farm by-products are all solutions that would allow for increased food supplies, while addressing climate change.</strong></em></p> <p>By José Graziano da Silva, Director General of the Food and Agriculture Organisation of the United Nations (<strong><a href="http://www.fao.org/index_en.htm" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">FAO</a></strong>).</p></div> Wed, 12 Dec 2012 23:00:01 +0000 José Graziano da Silva 10132 at http://l.blogs.oxfam Day 3: The Ultimate, Elegant Engineering Solution http://l.blogs.oxfam/en/blogs/12-12-12-day-3-ultimate-elegant-engineering-solution <div class="field field-name-blog-main-image-absolute"><a href="http://l.blogs.oxfam/en/blogs/12-12-12-day-3-ultimate-elegant-engineering-solution"><div class="field field-name-field-main-blog-image"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://l.blogs.oxfam/sites/default/files/styles/blogmain-list-embed/public/blogimages/main/7%20McKibben.JPG?itok=GLYzfhIw" width="210" height="110" alt="Preparing porridge, Mali. Image: Oxfam" title="Preparing porridge, Mali. Image: Oxfam" /></div></a></div><h3 class="title blog-title"><a href="http://l.blogs.oxfam/en/blogs/12-12-12-day-3-ultimate-elegant-engineering-solution"><span class="node-type-icon node-type-blog"></span>Blog: Day 3: The Ultimate, Elegant Engineering Solution</a></h3><div class="field field-name-post-date">11 December 2012</div><div class="field field-name-body"><p><em><strong>Low-input agriculture is hardly primitive. It is a highly skilled craft, utterly unlike the formulaic industry that “conventional” farming has become. Instead of continuing to pour oil on plants and hope for the best, let’s embrace an agriculture that requires more attention, more vigilance, and more knowledge</strong></em></p> <p><em>By Bill McKibben, Founder of <strong><a href="http://350.org/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">350.org </a></strong></em></p></div> Tue, 11 Dec 2012 23:00:20 +0000 Bill McKibben 10128 at http://l.blogs.oxfam Day 3: We can reduce fossil fuel use, but we need chemical fertilizer http://l.blogs.oxfam/en/blogs/12-12-12-day-3-we-can-reduce-fossil-fuel-use-we-need-chemical-fertilizer <div class="field field-name-blog-main-image-absolute"><a href="http://l.blogs.oxfam/en/blogs/12-12-12-day-3-we-can-reduce-fossil-fuel-use-we-need-chemical-fertilizer"><div class="field field-name-field-main-blog-image"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://l.blogs.oxfam/sites/default/files/styles/blogmain-list-embed/public/blogimages/main/6.%20Prem.jpg?itok=zwfimgs5" width="210" height="110" alt="Lettuce seedlings. Image: Oxfam" title="Lettuce seedlings. Image: Oxfam" /></div></a></div><h3 class="title blog-title"><a href="http://l.blogs.oxfam/en/blogs/12-12-12-day-3-we-can-reduce-fossil-fuel-use-we-need-chemical-fertilizer"><span class="node-type-icon node-type-blog"></span>Blog: Day 3: We can reduce fossil fuel use, but we need chemical fertilizer</a></h3><div class="field field-name-post-date">11 December 2012</div><div class="field field-name-body"><p><em><strong>We mustn’t allow emotions to cloud our understanding of fundamental natural laws. To feed a world of 9 billion people without chemical fertilizers would irreparably damage biodiversity. Let’s reduce fertilizer overuse in China and shift that to Africa, where lack of fertilizer is a major cause of hunger.</strong></em></p> <p><em>By Prem Bindraban, Director of <strong><a href="http://www.isric.org/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">ISRIC</a></strong> (World Soil Information)</em></p></div> Tue, 11 Dec 2012 23:00:10 +0000 Prem Bindraban 10125 at http://l.blogs.oxfam Day 3: Why eat oil when we could eat sunlight? http://l.blogs.oxfam/en/blogs/12-12-12-day-3-why-eat-oil-when-we-could-eat-sunlight <div class="field field-name-blog-main-image-absolute"><a href="http://l.blogs.oxfam/en/blogs/12-12-12-day-3-why-eat-oil-when-we-could-eat-sunlight"><div class="field field-name-field-main-blog-image"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://l.blogs.oxfam/sites/default/files/styles/blogmain-list-embed/public/blogimages/main/5.%20Lappe.jpg?itok=hB9sEmhg" width="210" height="110" alt="Pirogues on the river Niger. Image: Oxfam" title="Pirogues on the river Niger. Image: Oxfam" /></div></a></div><h3 class="title blog-title"><a href="http://l.blogs.oxfam/en/blogs/12-12-12-day-3-why-eat-oil-when-we-could-eat-sunlight"><span class="node-type-icon node-type-blog"></span>Blog: Day 3: Why eat oil when we could eat sunlight? </a></h3><div class="field field-name-post-date">11 December 2012</div><div class="field field-name-body"><p><em><strong>Anna Lappé argues we should feel a sense of urgency and a sense of hope in transitioning towards more ecological farming. We know how to farm without costly reliance on fossil fuels and we know the freedom it brings from corporations’ monopoly control.</strong></em></p> <p><em>by Anna Lappé, Founding Principal of the Small Planet Institute</em></p></div> Tue, 11 Dec 2012 23:00:01 +0000 Anna Lappé 10127 at http://l.blogs.oxfam Day 2: How Institutional Reform Saved Agriculture—and Us! http://l.blogs.oxfam/en/blogs/12-12-11-day-2-how-institutional-reform-saved-agriculture-us <div class="field field-name-blog-main-image-absolute"><a href="http://l.blogs.oxfam/en/blogs/12-12-11-day-2-how-institutional-reform-saved-agriculture-us"><div class="field field-name-field-main-blog-image"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://l.blogs.oxfam/sites/default/files/styles/blogmain-list-embed/public/blogimages/main/4.%20Ambler.jpg?itok=ELuAN0Ww" width="210" height="110" alt="Revolution. Image: Oxfam" title="Revolution. Image: Oxfam" /></div></a></div><h3 class="title blog-title"><a href="http://l.blogs.oxfam/en/blogs/12-12-11-day-2-how-institutional-reform-saved-agriculture-us"><span class="node-type-icon node-type-blog"></span>Blog: Day 2: How Institutional Reform Saved Agriculture—and Us!</a></h3><div class="field field-name-post-date">10 December 2012</div><div class="field field-name-body"><p><em><strong>In the world of 2050, healthy food is abundant and politicians view a sustainable agricultural system as non-negotiable. Looking back, it’s clear that institutional reform was the key to success in the realms of innovation, production, and consumption.</strong></em></p> <p><em>By John Ambler, Vice-President for Strategy, <strong><a href="http://www.oxfamamerica.org/" rel="nofollow">Oxfam America</a></strong></em></p></div> Mon, 10 Dec 2012 23:01:00 +0000 John Ambler 10113 at http://l.blogs.oxfam Day 2: A Less Risky Business http://l.blogs.oxfam/en/blogs/12-12-11-less-risky-business-helping-small-farmers-cope-market-climate-risks <div class="field field-name-blog-main-image-absolute"><a href="http://l.blogs.oxfam/en/blogs/12-12-11-less-risky-business-helping-small-farmers-cope-market-climate-risks"><div class="field field-name-field-main-blog-image"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://l.blogs.oxfam/sites/default/files/styles/blogmain-list-embed/public/blogimages/main/3.%20Fan_.jpg?itok=felhi3mI" width="210" height="110" alt="A woman holding an umbrella in the streets of Benin. Image: Oxfam" title="A woman holding an umbrella in the streets of Benin. Image: Oxfam" /></div></a></div><h3 class="title blog-title"><a href="http://l.blogs.oxfam/en/blogs/12-12-11-less-risky-business-helping-small-farmers-cope-market-climate-risks"><span class="node-type-icon node-type-blog"></span>Blog: Day 2: A Less Risky Business</a></h3><div class="field field-name-post-date">10 December 2012</div><div class="field field-name-body"><p><em><strong>We must invest in reducing the two greatest risks smallholders face: weather-related risk from climate change and market-related risk from globalization. Hope lies in stress-tolerant crops and innovative insurance plans, as well as social safety nets and other public welfare programs</strong></em></p> <p><em>By Shenggen Fan, Director General, International Food Policy Research Institute (<a href="http://www.ifpri.org/" rel="nofollow"><strong>IFPRI</strong></a>)</em></p></div> Mon, 10 Dec 2012 23:00:01 +0000 Shenggen Fan 10112 at http://l.blogs.oxfam Day 1: Apply what we already know works http://l.blogs.oxfam/en/blogs/12-12-10-apply-what-we-already-know-works <div class="field field-name-blog-main-image-absolute"><a href="http://l.blogs.oxfam/en/blogs/12-12-10-apply-what-we-already-know-works"><div class="field field-name-field-main-blog-image"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://l.blogs.oxfam/sites/default/files/styles/blogmain-list-embed/public/blogimages/main/1.%20Nwanze%20goed_0.jpg?itok=hrNky435" width="210" height="110" alt="Woman sweeping her yard, Uganda. Image: Oxfam" title="Woman sweeping her yard, Uganda. Image: Oxfam" /></div></a></div><h3 class="title blog-title"><a href="http://l.blogs.oxfam/en/blogs/12-12-10-apply-what-we-already-know-works"><span class="node-type-icon node-type-blog"></span>Blog: Day 1: Apply what we already know works</a></h3><div class="field field-name-post-date">9 December 2012</div><div class="field field-name-body"><h3><strong><em>In many unlikely and inhospitable places, smallholders are already feeding themselves and their communities and leading their nation’s economic growth. Many of the solutions to farming’s challenges exist. They need tailoring to each locale and long-term reliable policy support.</em></strong></h3>   By Kanayo F.</div> Sun, 09 Dec 2012 23:00:01 +0000 Kanayo F. Nwanze 10107 at http://l.blogs.oxfam Day 1: Risky Business http://l.blogs.oxfam/en/blogs/12-12-10-risky-business <div class="field field-name-blog-main-image-absolute"><a href="http://l.blogs.oxfam/en/blogs/12-12-10-risky-business"><div class="field field-name-field-main-blog-image"><img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://l.blogs.oxfam/sites/default/files/styles/blogmain-list-embed/public/blogimages/main/2%20Sophia_Murphy_.risky_.jpg?itok=8VS8f8c7" width="210" height="110" alt="Ferry’ crossing the Bani river to reach the market. Image: Oxfam" title="Ferry’ crossing the Bani river to reach the market. Image: Oxfam" /></div></a></div><h3 class="title blog-title"><a href="http://l.blogs.oxfam/en/blogs/12-12-10-risky-business"><span class="node-type-icon node-type-blog"></span>Blog: Day 1: Risky Business</a></h3><div class="field field-name-post-date">9 December 2012</div><div class="field field-name-body"><p><strong><em>Agriculture is a risky business, not only because of its dependence on the weather. Governments, the private sector and farmers themselves need to build robust and overlapping risk-management systems that provide farmers with more than one avenue for protection. </em></strong></p> <p>By <strong><a href="http://blogs.oxfam.org/en/user/profile/sophia-murphy">Sophia Murphy</a></strong>, Senior advisor to the Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy</p></div> Sun, 09 Dec 2012 23:00:01 +0000 Sophia Murphy 10109 at http://l.blogs.oxfam