armed violence

Arms Trade Treaty Campaigner, New York, July 2012. Photo: Andrew Kelly/Control Arms

Blog: A global Arms Trade Treaty: a marathon not a sprint

The fight for an Arms Trade Treaty has been a marathon – not a sprint. Here, Oxfam’s Head of Arms Control Anna Macdonald sets out why she believes it’s worth staying the course.

The world has come within a hair’s breadth of agreeing a global Arms Trade Treaty. This would have been a huge step in the right direction for preventing genocide and human rights abuses by bringing the arms trade under control – and given the shocking atrocities unraveling in Syria each day, it’s definitely long overdue.

Banksy's iconic graffiti of a child soldier is recreated to call for tighter controls on the arms trade. Photo: Nick Stern

Blog: UK and US: Save the Arms Trade Treaty negotiations

At the Arms Trade Treaty conference at the UN in New York, delegates have been dragging their feet, playing musical chairs and generally skirting around discussions. With disagreements from the start, the talks are not on track. So, we need States to pick up the pace to ensure that a bulletproof treaty is agreed when the conference closes on July 27th.

Blog: Encuentro con Julius Arile, de la campaña Armas bajo Control: un mensaje desde Kenia

A tan sólo unos días del inicio la reunión de gobiernos en Nueva York para negociar el Tratado sobre el Comercio de Armas que podría ordenar el flujo descontrolado de armas y municiones; me reuní con un amigo de muchos años de la campaña, Julius Arile, en su casa de Pokot Occidental, en la provincia noroeste de Kenia en el Valle del Rift.

Blog: Meeting the Control Arms 'Millionth Supporter' Julius Arile: a message from Kenya

With just a few days before governments meet in New York to negotiate an Arms Trade Treaty that could bring the uncontrolled trade of arms and ammunition to heel, I met with a long-time friend of the campaign, Julius Arile, in his home of West Pokot, in the Rift Valley province of North-West Kenya.

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