climate deal

Caravan of Hope Activists in Malawi, pose with their placard. Photo: Oxfam

Blog: Winners and losers in the Durban climate deal

In the early hours of Sunday morning, governments meeting at the UN climate change conference in Durban, South Africa, set a path towards a new legally binding agreement for all countries to cut emissions. But the deal struck does little to meet the needs of poor people fighting climate change right now, and risks blurring important distinctions between the responsibilities to act of developed and developing countries.

Oxfam's stunt shows how the food we all rely on is at risk in the face of a changing climate. Ainhoa Goma/Oxfam

Blog: Climate deal fails poor people

Negotiators at the UN climate talks have narrowly avoided a collapse, agreeing to the bare minimum deal possible as the UN climate talks in Durban went well beyond the eleventh, twelfth and thirteenth hours.

Tweet a leader: let’s get some action going at COP17

Blog: Tweet a leader: let’s get some action going at COP17

The climate negotiations in Durban are stuttering. There is little progress on agreement on the emission reductions needed to keep warming below 2 degrees. There is also a rumbling debate about how to fill the Green Climate Fund.

Oxfam puppets: Mama Mhlaba (Zulu for Mother Earth) & Baba Manzi (Father Water). Credit: Ainhoa Goma/Oxfam

Blog: Thousands call for climate justice while countries prepare their blindfolds

Saturday 3 December was not a normal day for the population of Durban, South Africa. A climate march wound around the streets of the centre as somewhere between 10, 000 to 15,000 people called for – in fact demanded – action on climate change. They brought the city to a colourful, vibrant and peaceful standstill.

Barbecued mealies (corn cobs), madumbes (root vegetable like potatoes), grilled beef, and puthu (stiff maize porridge), South Africa. Photo: Paul Weinberg/Oxfam.

Blog: Angélique Kidjo: Climate Action, One Bite at a Time

There is an old African riddle I am very fond of: “How do you eat an elephant?” To which the answer is “A bite at a time.” It should be on every ones lips at the climate change talks in Durban. It can seem that climate change is so big, so complex, so all encompassing that, like our culinary elephant, it is too big to handle and there is nothing we can do to make a difference. Not true. It just needs to be taken a bite at a time. 

Blog: Hungry for climate action: climate conference begins in Durban

The United Nations have unpacked the bunting and draped the decorations around Durban, South Africa, for the next round of climate negotiations, COP17. Leaders, policy experts, delegates, caravanites, photo exhibitions, puppets, the world’s media and all manner of colorful characters have arrived to get their teeth into securing progress in the fight against climate change.

Blog: How do we sleep while our beds are burning?

Today the TckTckTck, an unprecedented global alliance of civil society organizations, trade unions, faith groups and individuals, is launching a global musical petition for a climate deal in Copenhagen in December.

The re-mix of the song "Beds are Burning" features over 60 artists and celebrities, and has been re-written by Midnight Oil themselves to reflect the greatest humanitarian crisis facing humankind today.

Blog: Keep the pressure up…

Today the Executive Secretary Yvo de Boer met with observer organisations to answers their questions.

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