collective organizing

Man with his packed donkey in Kosht epa valley, Afghanistan

Blog: Day 7: Farmers do not come from Mars

If poor farmers had more freedom to innovate and adequate access to public and private investments, they would likely disappoint us by getting out of farming altogether. But even if only one or two in five remained, they would change the world for the better, literally.

By Julio A. Berdegué, Principal Researcher, Latin American Centre for Rural Development (RIMISP)

Farmers listen to a lecture on sustainable farming techniques, Nigeria. Image: Oxfam

Blog: Day 5: Group Mutuality Paves the Way to a Sustainable Future for Smallholders

The fundamental problem for both female and male smallholders is the size of their farms. They are simply too small to generate an acceptable livelihood. An incorporated farm model could overcome many of the current obstacles and be the farming system of the future.

By Nicko Debenham, Director, Development & Sustainability at Armajaro Trading Ltd.

Jean Phombeya and her seeds in Malawi. Image: Oxfam

Blog: Day 7: Seeds and Sisterhood

Governments and development agencies need to shift the onus of feeding the world away from time-strapped impoverished women, and instead support their organizing and cultivate their traditional knowledge. We also need to rethink women’s unpaid care work and lack of time as fundamental issues of food security.

By Joanna Kerr, CEO of ActionAid International

Women collecting water in Uganda. Image: Oxfam

Blog: Day 5: Time for a New Recipe

The women’s movement hasn’t been proactive about defining its own platform for action on food justice, and we are noticeably absent from spaces where decisions are made. We need to break out of our silos, strengthen our technical expertise, and start shaping the political process rather than stand on the sidelines.

by Alexandra Spieldoch, women's rights activist, formerly with WOCAN

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