conflict

Hussein Ammar, 27, from Qusayr, Syria, is reunited with his mother after two months of separation. Photo: Sam Tarling/Oxfam

Blog: Trends in humanitarian policy and practice: What to watch in 2015

One of my favorite parts of my job at Oxfam is reading new research findings and reports in our field to help my humanitarian programming and policy colleagues keep on top of external trends. I recently conducted such a scan to guide Oxfam’s planning for the coming year. Here are eight of the most interesting things that I found.

Syrian refugee with her child, in Lebanon's Beeka Valley. Photo: Joelle Bassoul/Oxfam

Blog: International community must step up its support for Lebanon

As an international community, it is within our power to ensure that the future for refugees and vulnerable Lebanese communities isn’t hopeless. Supporting Lebanon now can make a critical difference both for the millions of people in need .

Families in Tong Ping displaced persons settlement carry their newly received non food items back to where they're staying. Photo: Anita Kattakhuzy/Oxfam

Blog: Oxfam welcomes landmark UN Security Council Resolution on policing

Elizabeth lives in a UN camp for displaced persons in Juba, the capital of South Sudan. She’s just one of around 100,000 civilians who has sought refuge in one of the compounds the United Nations peacekeeping Mission in South Sudan (UNMISS), following the outbreak of vicious fighting in December 2013.

Hemos ayudado a más de 500.000 personas en Sudán del Sur hasta el momento, como estos desplazados en el poblado de Mingkaman. Foto: Pablo Tosco

Blog: South Sudan, one of the most challenging places to be a humanitarian

On World Humanitarian Day Pieter Struijf, Oxfam’s Program Manager for Jonglei, writes about the challenges of delivering aid in rural South Sudan and the crucial role played by the local staff.

1.5 million people have been displaced by this conflict. Almost 100,000 have sought shelter in UN bases like this one in Bor.

Blog: South Sudan at 3: A tenuous shelter behind razor wire

Today marks South Sudan’s third year of independence. But in the past seven months, the sense of unity that brought its people together in 2011 has been lost, pushing 1.5 million from their homes and forcing many to live in appalling conditions.

Une femme tient sa fille contre elle lors d'un bombardement par l'aviation syrienne. Photo : Sam Tarling/Oxfam

Blog: « Ayez confiance en nous, les femmes syriennes. Nous sommes capables de tout »

Jenny Enarsson, conseillère genre pour les opérations d'Oxfam face à la crise en Syrie, explique pourquoi il est essentiel que les femmes de Syrie puissent participer aux négociations dans le cadre du processus de paix.

Une femme tient sa fille contre elle lors d'un bombardement par l'aviation syrienne. Photo : Sam Tarling/Oxfam

Blog: ‘Have faith in Syrian women. We can do anything.’

Jenny Enarsson, Oxfam's Syria crisis response gender advisor, explains why including Syria's women in negotiations is critical for the peace process.

Manyangson Ngong, le capitaine de l’équipe Lucky Start du camp d’Ayilo. Photo : Oxfam

Blog: Comment des réfugiés sud-soudanais font du foot un instrument de paix, au-delà des clivages

Tandis que la Coupe du monde bat son plein au Brésil, une compétition d’un autre genre a lieu dans le nord de l’Ouganda. Dans les districts d’Arua et d’Adjumani, de jeunes réfugiés sud-soudanais ont formé des équipes de football afin de jouer pour la paix.

« Jamais je ne me serais attendu à en arriver là. Bor, l’école et mes amis me manquent », témoigne Manyangson Ngong, le capitaine de l’équipe Lucky Start du camp d’Ayilo. Le conflit qui a poussé tant de personnes à fuir pour sauver leur vie a aussi coupé court à ses études, à Bor.

Football for peace: World Cup fever helps bridge barriers for South Sudanese refugees

Blog: Football for peace: World Cup fever helps bridge barriers for South Sudanese refugees

As countries from all over compete for the World Cup title in Brazil, a different kind of tournament is taking place in northern Uganda. There, in the districts of Arua and Adjumani, young South Sudanese refugees have formed football teams to play for peace.

“I never expected to end up in such a situation. I miss Bor, school and my friends,” says 18-year-old Manyangson Ngong, the captain of the Lucky Start team from Ayilo settlement. His studies in Bor were cut short at the start of the conflict that has left many fleeing for safety.

A water point in Simbili settlement, Arua district, Uganda. Photo: Petterik Wiggers/Panos Pictures London UK

Blog: South Sudan's young refugees in Uganda: a hope for peace

A lanky boy wearing torn shorts and ill-fitting black sandals adorned with pink plastic hearts emerged from a grass-thatched hut and walked towards me.

In perfect English, Jacob explained how he had come to live in this remote refugee settlement, one of scores of camps being carved out of the forest across several districts of Uganda bordering South Sudan. 18 months ago he had been one of the privileged few South Sudanese attending high school in Uganda’s capital Kampala. But then a few months ago he received the call that would change his life.  

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - conflict