extractive industries

Oxfam campaign graphic telling Peru’s President Pedro Pablo Kuczynski that prior consultation is a human right.

Blog: A win for Free, Prior and Informed Consent: Indigenous leaders halt protests after Peru agrees to meet their demands

The Peruvian government’s agreement with indigenous leaders in oil block 192 offers a ray of hope for indigenous organizations fighting to have a say in projects that affect them, but major gaps remain in consultation processes across Latin America.

Villagers near Ka Chok, Cambodia are concerned about a mining concession granted to a Vietnamese company. Local farmers were not consulted about the concession and worry that they lose access to farm lands. Credit: Patrick Brown/Oxfam

Blog: 4 critical ways oil, gas, and mining companies must support local community rights

For oil, gas, and mining companies, gaining access to land and water can make or break a project. For many communities their land is their lifeline, and this can be lost when they don’t have a say and their rights are ignored. Today, Oxfam launched a new report reviewing the public policy commitments of 38 oil, gas, and mining companies around issues of community engagement and rights, with a particular focus on free, prior, and informed consent (FPIC).

Uranium mining in Niger: Shining a light on a case of injustice

Blog: Uranium mining in Niger: Shining a light on a case of injustice

If you ask a French citizen where their electricity comes from, many would proudly say from ‘green power’, meaning nuclear power. France has one of the largest nuclear power complexes in the world, supplying powerhouse economies like Germany as well as many Eastern European countries.

But France doesn’t have much uranium for nuclear generation. For more than 50 years this simply hasn’t been a problem. Since it struck an agreement with the poor, landlocked country of Niger in 1967, France has been getting a pretty good deal.

Oxfam’s To-Do List for President Obama's Africa Trip

Blog: Oxfam’s To-Do List for President Obama's Africa Trip

 

Over the next decade, more than $1 trillion in natural resources will be extracted from the African continent. Currently, Africa exports more than $300 billion a year in oil, gas and mineral exports—more than four times the amount of aid the continent receives. But that money is not building roads, schools and hospitals for Africa’s people. In fact, booming extractives industries often lead to more poverty and powerlessness. 

In 2010, Africa’s oil, gas and mineral exports amounted to $333 billion. Photo: Rebecca Blackwell/Oxfam

Blog: Africa in control of its fortune

Several African countries are amongst today’s fastest growing economies in the world, boosted in many instances by new discoveries of oil, natural gas and strategic mineral reserves. Extreme poverty on the continent is in decline, and progress towards meeting the Millennium Development Goals has accelerated. A number of very poor African countries, including Malawi, Sierra Leone, and Ethiopia have made recent and substantial improvements in their levels of income equality.

En 2010, las exportaciones africanas de petróleo, gas y minerales ascendieron a un total de 333.000 millones de dólares de  Foto: Rebecca Blackwell/Oxfam

Blog: África debe ser dueña de su destino

Impulsados por el descubrimiento de nuevos yacimientos de petróleo, gas natural o de reservas estratégicas de minerales, son varios los países africanos que se encuentran entre las economías que más rápido crecen del mundo. La pobreza extrema disminuye en todo el continente y los progresos hacia la consecución de los Objetivos de Desarrollo del Milenio se han acelerado. Recientemente, varios países africanos muy pobres, entre ellos Malawi, Sierra Leona y Etiopía, han mejorado de forma sustancial sus niveles de igualdad en los ingresos. 

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