food justice

Virginia Ñuñonca sees the climate changing in Peru. Photo: Percy Ramírez/Oxfam

Blog: One woman’s story of fighting climate change – and how you can join her

Virginia’s story

“I see the climate is changing a lot,” says Virginia Ñuñonca, a farmer and community leader in the Peruvian highlands. “Before it wasn’t like this. Sometimes these days, with the cold and the frost, the grass gets really dry.”

Virginia has experienced first-hand the single biggest threat to the fight against hunger: climate change. It’s already making people hungry. Around the world wild weather and unpredictable seasons are causing chaos for farmers. Food prices are going up. Food quality is going down. Soon climate change will affect what all of us eat.

A small-scale farmer from the Matagalpa region of northeastern Nicaragua. Image: Oxfam

Blog: Day 9: Feminism and Food Sovereignty

Food sovereignty offers opportunities to advance women’s rights, but we must also work to change gender relations within rural families and within our own movement. Peasant movements such as La Via Campesina must step up to the challenge of linking food sovereignty and feminism.

By Pamela Elisa Caro Molina, feminist researcher working with CLOC-La Via Campesina

Women collecting water in Uganda. Image: Oxfam

Blog: Day 5: Time for a New Recipe

The women’s movement hasn’t been proactive about defining its own platform for action on food justice, and we are noticeably absent from spaces where decisions are made. We need to break out of our silos, strengthen our technical expertise, and start shaping the political process rather than stand on the sidelines.

by Alexandra Spieldoch, women's rights activist, formerly with WOCAN

A woman working on a farm in Stellenbosch, South Africa. Image: Oxfam

Blog: Day 4: Women Farm Workers Dying for Food

One of the ultimate perversities of our era is that the producers of food and their children often go to bed hungry. Reform of commercial agriculture is urgent if the women farm workers who grow and pack our food are to have enough to eat.

By Fatima Shabodien, former Director of the Women on Farms Project

Learning at Apna Kendra bridge school for working children in India. Image: Oxfam

Blog: Day 3: Seeds in Women’s Hands

Seeds are the first link in the food chain. Yet women seed breeders are invisible in the industrial model of food production and in intellectual property regimes. The roots of food and gender justice lie in keeping seeds in women’s hands and recognizing women’s knowledge of biodiversity.

by Vandana Shiva, philosopher, feminist and environmental activist

Women and their role in the agricultural value chain. Image: Oxfam

Blog: Day 2: The Potential of Women Suppliers

Food system transformation will require the engagement of women suppliers along entire agricultural value chains. Women need to shift out of labour into business ownership, and women suppliers need to get organized to have access to actual buyers.

By Elizabeth Vazquez, CEO of WEConnect International

Desta Yirsa, a farmer in Ethiopia. Image: Oxfam

Blog: Day 1: Changing Value Systems, One Village at a Time

If in the course of earning income women farmers are systematically exploited, have their control over what is grown and how taken away from them, and are left with a denuded natural environs, then this is a heavy price to pay for so-called empowerment.

By Nidhi Tandon, activist and Director of Networked Intelligence for Development

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