food sovereignty

A female farmer in her field, in El Salvador. Text overlay: "Everyone has the right to good food"

Blog: Cultivating Food Security for the people of El Salvador

Most of us eat food at least three times a day. But in El Salvador those who grow over 80 percent of the food consumed in the country are those most likely to suffer from hunger. It's time to change this.

 Cooking porridge, Somalia

Blog: Day 9: Who Will Feed Us All?

If we are to survive climate change, we must adopt policies that let peasants diversify the plant and animal varieties on our menus. Only they have the know-how and patience to find out what plants and livestock will thrive where. A fundamental change in the regulatory machinery is needed.

By Pat Mooney, Co-founder and executive director of the ETC Group

Corn, Bolivia

Blog: Day 6: The Future of Agriculture is the Future of Mother Earth

Nothing is as ironic as the fact that we indigenous peoples, who brought so many foods to the world, lack the means to escape poverty and malnutrition. Having control over what we produce, how and when we do it, and power over its distribution will allow us to build sustainable livelihoods. We call that food sovereignty.

By Tarcila Rivera Zea, Director of the Centre for Peru’s Indigenous Cultures (CHIRAPAQ)

A small-scale farmer from the Matagalpa region of northeastern Nicaragua. Image: Oxfam

Blog: Day 9: Feminism and Food Sovereignty

Food sovereignty offers opportunities to advance women’s rights, but we must also work to change gender relations within rural families and within our own movement. Peasant movements such as La Via Campesina must step up to the challenge of linking food sovereignty and feminism.

By Pamela Elisa Caro Molina, feminist researcher working with CLOC-La Via Campesina

Learning at Apna Kendra bridge school for working children in India. Image: Oxfam

Blog: Day 3: Seeds in Women’s Hands

Seeds are the first link in the food chain. Yet women seed breeders are invisible in the industrial model of food production and in intellectual property regimes. The roots of food and gender justice lie in keeping seeds in women’s hands and recognizing women’s knowledge of biodiversity.

by Vandana Shiva, philosopher, feminist and environmental activist

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