Sahel food crisis

Photo of Saliou Diallo working in his maize field.

Blog: Sahel food crisis update: lifting a heavy load

Before completely turning my back on 2012, I am reflecting on Oxfam’s work in the Sahel over the last year. After a season of poor or erratic rains across the region in 2011, Oxfam and many other humanitarian groups feared that another bad harvest in 2012 would push millions into starvation.

For women in Fulani their main activity is  increasingly having to fetch water, as surrounding wells dry up. Photo: Charles Bambara/Oxfam

Blog: Sahel food crisis: Let's close the funding gap

In the Sahel region of West Africa, a severe food crisis has been expected since late 2011. The aid community estimates that some 18.7 million people are now being affected and are now at risk.The UN estimates that $1.6 billion is needed to meet the needs of all these people, but their international appe

Kristalina Georgieva, EU Commissioner for Humanitarian Aid, accepts the Avaaz/Oxfam #Sahel2012 petition

Blog: Determination not dreams: Time to act for the Sahel now

“The world is full of dreams that became a reality when people had the determination to make them so.” These were the words of Kristalina Georgieva, EU Commissioner for Humanitarian Aid, on Monday as she addressed a room of government and international agency representatives summoned together for an urgent meeting on the Sahel food crisis.

Demand that G20 leaders take action for a sustainable future

Blog: An Oxfam Activist's Guide to the G20

What is the G20?

The G20 – or group of 20 – started as a group of finance ministers and central bank governors from 20 major economies (it’s actually 19 countries, plus the European Union) that gather annually to discuss key issues in the global economy. Since 2008, the G20 has met at the Head of State level. Collectively, the G20 economies account for two thirds of the world population and more than 80 percent of the gross world product (GWP). The G20 has declared itself to be the world’s premier forum for economic development, setting high expectations. 

Un responsable de seguridad alimentaria de Oxfam conversa con el pastor Abdel Karim Tahira. Foto: Andy Hall/Oxfam

Blog: 18 millones de personas en riesgo en la crisis alimentaria de Sahel [infografía]

En la región de Sahel de África Occidental, las familias están enfrentándose a una cruda realidad. La crisis alimentaria ahora amenaza a más de 18 millones de personas. Sin ayuda, no lograrán tener suficiente para comer. 

Un employé d'Oxfam discute avec un éleveur Tchadien. Photo : Andy Hall/Oxfam

Blog: 18 millions de personnes menacées par la crise alimentaire au Sahel [infographie]

Dans la région du Sahel, en Afrique de l’Ouest, des familles continuent d’être confrontées à une terrible réalité. La crise alimentaire menace désormais plus de 18 millions de personnes. Sans aide, elles n’auront plus assez à manger.

Sécheresse, maigres récoltes et prix élevés sont à l’origine du problème, de même que la pauvreté. Des agriculteurs et pasteurs se retrouvent face à des choix impossibles. S’ils vendent leurs outils et leur bétail pour pouvoir s’acheter de la nourriture, comment gagneront-ils leur vie demain, lorsque les pluies seront de retour ?

Oxfam food security officer talks with Chadian herder Abdel Karim Tahira. Photo: Andy Hall/Oxfam

Blog: 18 million at risk in the Sahel food crisis [infographic]

In the Sahel region of West Africa, families are facing a grim reality. A food crisis is now threatening more than 18 million people. Without help they won't get enough to eat.

Drought, poor harvests, the lingering effects of an earlier food crisis in 2010, and high prices in the market are part of the problem -- and so is poverty. It forces farmers and herders to make impossible choices: if they sell their tools and livestock now, to get money to get food, then how will they make a living later when the rains return?

Oxfam team analyzing water delivery. Photo: Pablo Tosco/Oxfam

Blog: 15 million at risk in the Sahel food crisis: urgent help is needed now

In the Sahel region of West Africa, families are facing a grim reality. A food crisis is now threatening more than 15 miillion people. Without help they won't get enough to eat.

Drought, poor harvets, and high prices in the market are part of the problem -- and so is poverty. It forces farmers and herders to make impossible choices: If they sell their tools and livestock now, to get money to get food, then how will they make a living later when the rains return?

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