seeds

 Cooking porridge, Somalia

Blog: Day 9: Who Will Feed Us All?

If we are to survive climate change, we must adopt policies that let peasants diversify the plant and animal varieties on our menus. Only they have the know-how and patience to find out what plants and livestock will thrive where. A fundamental change in the regulatory machinery is needed.

By Pat Mooney, Co-founder and executive director of the ETC Group

Member of Dilokata farmers group in her garden in Bito village, Uganda. Photo: Oxfam

Blog: Day 8: The Future is Already Here

The future has arrived, it’s just not at the scale required. The spread of bottom-up approaches to farmer innovation, coupled with breakthrough technology developed by input companies, will make smallholders productive and profitable. Crucially, new technologies must be accessible, appropriate and affordable.

By Kavita Prakash-Mani, Head of Food Security Agenda, Syngenta International

Bangladeshi women filling their water cans

Blog: Day 7: Working harder isn’t working

Striving to produce ever more food is the wrong starting point for achieving food security. Instead, let’s focus on reducing inequalities by giving small-scale farmers’ more control, valuing their knowledge, and removing barriers that hamper women’s ability to farm on equal terms.

By Rokeya Kabir, Executive Director of Bangladesh Nari Progati Sangha (BNPS)

A small-scale farmer from the Matagalpa region of northeastern Nicaragua. Image: Oxfam

Blog: Day 9: Feminism and Food Sovereignty

Food sovereignty offers opportunities to advance women’s rights, but we must also work to change gender relations within rural families and within our own movement. Peasant movements such as La Via Campesina must step up to the challenge of linking food sovereignty and feminism.

By Pamela Elisa Caro Molina, feminist researcher working with CLOC-La Via Campesina

Learning at Apna Kendra bridge school for working children in India. Image: Oxfam

Blog: Day 3: Seeds in Women’s Hands

Seeds are the first link in the food chain. Yet women seed breeders are invisible in the industrial model of food production and in intellectual property regimes. The roots of food and gender justice lie in keeping seeds in women’s hands and recognizing women’s knowledge of biodiversity.

by Vandana Shiva, philosopher, feminist and environmental activist

Justin Madut tends his new groundnut and sorghum fields. Photo: Oxfam

Blog: Planting the seeds of a better future in South Sudan

With failed rains, conflict and poor infrastructure, many communities in South Sudan struggle to get enough to eat. Abdullah Ampilan reports from Warrap State on an Oxfam project to improve their long-term food security, providing tools and seeds to help farmers grow a wider variety of crops:

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