women's rights

Farmers celebrate a new irrigation pump in Rithora Village, Uttar Pradesh, India. Photo: Rajendra Shaw/Oxfam

Blog: Ending women's inequality is key to tackling hunger. Who cares?

A new UN report released today on ‘Women’s Rights and the Right to Food’ puts the spotlight on the hugely disproportionate amount of time that women spend caring for their family.

Photo of Aruna Kumari Kori speaking at the event

Blog: India's Domestic Violence Act: first state-level stock taking

In collaboration with the civil society collective in Lucknow, Oxfam India recently organized the first state-level stock taking in Uttar Pradesh on the Protection of Women from Domestic Violence Act 2005. This was to cooincide with International Human Rights Day and the concluding day of 16 Days of Activism.

A small-scale farmer from the Matagalpa region of northeastern Nicaragua. Image: Oxfam

Blog: Day 9: Feminism and Food Sovereignty

Food sovereignty offers opportunities to advance women’s rights, but we must also work to change gender relations within rural families and within our own movement. Peasant movements such as La Via Campesina must step up to the challenge of linking food sovereignty and feminism.

By Pamela Elisa Caro Molina, feminist researcher working with CLOC-La Via Campesina

Women collecting water in Uganda. Image: Oxfam

Blog: Day 5: Time for a New Recipe

The women’s movement hasn’t been proactive about defining its own platform for action on food justice, and we are noticeably absent from spaces where decisions are made. We need to break out of our silos, strengthen our technical expertise, and start shaping the political process rather than stand on the sidelines.

by Alexandra Spieldoch, women's rights activist, formerly with WOCAN

A woman working on a farm in Stellenbosch, South Africa. Image: Oxfam

Blog: Day 4: Women Farm Workers Dying for Food

One of the ultimate perversities of our era is that the producers of food and their children often go to bed hungry. Reform of commercial agriculture is urgent if the women farm workers who grow and pack our food are to have enough to eat.

By Fatima Shabodien, former Director of the Women on Farms Project

Desta Yirsa, a farmer in Ethiopia. Image: Oxfam

Blog: Day 1: Changing Value Systems, One Village at a Time

If in the course of earning income women farmers are systematically exploited, have their control over what is grown and how taken away from them, and are left with a denuded natural environs, then this is a heavy price to pay for so-called empowerment.

By Nidhi Tandon, activist and Director of Networked Intelligence for Development

A Yemeni woman. Photo: Oxfam

Blog: Yemen: A wake up call to early marriage

Aisha, Wafa and Hafsa never imagined that their tragedies would signal a wake-up call for the residents of their small village in western Yemen. The two sisters Wafa and Aisha and their cousin Hafsa got married in 2010, when they were all under 16 – as is the custom in their village.

Women from the AWID forum march in Taksim Square. Photo: Oxfam/Jameen Kaur

Blog: Globalisation of Resistance: Taking to the Streets - ‘Jin, Jiyan, Azadi’ ('Women, Life, Freedom')

Jameen wraps up our 2012 AWID International Forum on Women’s Rights in Development coverage with this inspiring entry!

The word "courage" comes from the Latin word ‘cuer’ meaning heart. Courage translates to possessing the confidence "to lay bare your vulnerability and speak from the heart."

Journalist Hurriyet - Turkey's leading national newspaper interviewing Ester and Mandiwe. Photo: Oxfam

Blog: Belief is everything: ‘I have always believed I could be a leader.’

"Before I entered the Female Food Hero competition I had never been outside Tanzania, however I have always believed I could be a leader. I believe I have leadership qualities," explains Mandiwe in an interview conducted by a journalist writing for the Hurriyet newspaper, one of Turkey’s leading national newspapers.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - women's rights