Oxfam International Blogs - Private sector; food and beverage industry; business model; diversity; inclusion; corporate social responsibility; women’s leadership; consumers http://l.blogs.oxfam/en/tags/private-sector-food-and-beverage-industry-business-model-diversity-inclusion-corporate-social en Day 6: Stop Talking About Equality http://l.blogs.oxfam/en/blogs/stop-talking-about-equality <div class="field field-name-body"><p><em><strong>Business leaders change behavior when something is in it for them and their companies. If we want them to change the way they do business, we need to stop talking about justice and gender equality, and instead show how a fairer food system means sustainable profits.</strong></em></p> <p>By <a href="http://blogs.oxfam.org/en/user/profile/tinna-c-nielsen"><strong>Tinna Nielsen</strong></a>, senior diversity and inclusion consultant<strong></strong></p> <p><strong>Business leaders change behavior when something is in it for them and their businesses.</strong> If we want them to change the way they do business, we need to stop talking about justice and gender equality, and instead show how a fairer food system means sustainable profits.</p> <p>In my work as a business anthropologist in a private sector dairy and food company, I have seen how a change in discourse can lead to behavioral change among business leaders, which in turn leads to greater gender equality. Interestingly, shifting the focus away from ‘justice’, ‘women’ and ‘social responsibility’ and towards ‘profit’ is what has worked. If we expect private sector corporations to contribute to the development of ‘a just food system for women’, we need to empower the privileged to work in new ways.</p> <h3>From “equality” to “performance”</h3> <p>All discourses have connotations, and in the corporate world the discourses on gender equality and corporate social responsibility unfortunately imply helping the minority for the good of the minority. Over decades, this approach has not made any appreciable difference for women or people living in poverty, nor has it changed the mindset and behavior of corporate leaders.</p> <h3><em>"The discourse on gender equality and corporate social responsibility has not made any appreciable difference for women or people living in poverty.</em>"</h3> <p><strong><a href="http://www.internationalbusinessreport.com/files/ibr2012%20-%20women%20in%20senior%20management%20master.pdf" rel="nofollow">Research from 2011</a></strong> reveals that women currently hold 20% of senior management positions globally, down from 24% in 2009, and up just 1% from 2004. Worldwide women hold only 9% of CEO positions, even as the proportion of women in the labor market and middle management positions continuously increases. In recent years there has been no real progress in achieving gender diversity in the highest corporate decision-making bodies despite an increasing amount of companies implementing gender equality and diversity &amp; inclusion initiatives.</p> <p>My experience is that by emphasizing business benefits (higher performance, reduced costs, new market shares, and sustainable profits) we can change the mindset and behavior of business leaders. When equality and diversity are perceived as business enablers – as levers to performance rather than end goals – they matter to business leaders.</p> <p>Such a counter-discourse has worked in the global company where I work. Instead of setting goals for equality or diversity, we have set a strategic objective for team composition:</p> <p>All teams at all levels in all functions must contain no more than seventy per cent of the same gender, generation, national/ethnic background, and educational/disciplinary background. The business rationale is that reducing homogeneity in outlook and perspectives improves performance.</p> <p><a href="http://press.princeton.edu/titles/8353.html" rel="nofollow"><strong>Research</strong></a> and <a href="https://rowman.com/ISBN/9781442210455" rel="nofollow"><strong>best practices</strong></a> have proven that the inclusion of a diversity of perspectives and backgrounds makes for more sustainable and innovative solutions and decisions, because diverse teams process more information, make better predictions and adopt a longer-term perspective. This can have profound impacts for businesses, producers and consumers.</p> <p>Over many years I have seen that the first movers in such a change process are those for whom diversity connotes synergy, innovation and performance. As laudable as concerns of fairness and justice may be, they do not appear to create the proper expectations for <a href="http://hbr.org/1996/09/making-differences-matter-a-new-paradigm-for-managing-diversity/ar/1" rel="nofollow"><strong>benefits of diversity</strong></a> to materialize. The business case for diversity and the inclusion of women, on the other hand, does.</p> <h3>Diversity benefits women’s access to food</h3> <p>While diversity in the workforce is important, it alone is not sufficient to bring about meaningful change. Corporations must seek to bring diversity into their supply chains and target more diverse consumers as part of their innovation process and business model. This can have a meaningful impact on food security and the empowerment of women in poverty.</p> <h3><em> "Corporations must seek to bring diversity into their supply chains and target more diverse consumers."</em></h3> <p>For example, in the <a href="http://www.arlafoods.ca/" rel="nofollow"><strong>global food company</strong></a> where I work, consulting poor non-consumers in Africa as part of the business innovation process has paid off for both the company and poor women. Because company leaders learned that poor women could not afford baby formula, the company began producing small day-to-day packages that mothers could afford, instead of the large packages that they could not. Not only did their babies then have more reliable access to food, these female non-consumers suddenly acquired the status of important consumers in the company’s eyes.</p> <p>Another example is how collaboration with small cocoa bean producers in Africa gave business leaders new insights into how to keep prices and costs stable. Since the cocoa bean industry is volatile, farmers tended to change industry to survive, which indirectly led cocoa bean prices to rise. The company realized that by contributing to high living standards in terms of food security and education for the families of coco bean farmers, it could help prevent these farmers from moving over to the palm oil industry. There was clearly a business case for keeping supply prices stable in a volatile market.</p> <p>Some companies engage in this kind of inclusive collaboration with small food producers as part of their corporate social responsibility commitments, but I would argue that more companies would do so if the business case was made.</p> <h3>Empower the privileged</h3> <p>The powerful corporate leaders who are one of many blockers to a just food system do not wake up in the morning thinking about how they and their actions are connected to the poor or to women farmers in developing countries. For business leaders to change behavior, the case needs to be made for profit and market shares, not social responsibility. So we need to refocus our discourse: A just food system is one in which all people have access to food, because this will mean more consumers and more sustainable profits for corporations.</p> <h3><em>"For business leaders to change behavior, the case needs to be made for profit and market shares, not social responsibility."</em></h3> <p>We have to change the tools the privileged use to ‘govern’ their actions. This begins with personal development, where business leaders and employees gain a new kind of awareness of the world. They will not fundamentally transform their organizations and ways of doing business until they realize the value in consulting and working with people different from themselves in the global marketplace.</p> <h3>Moving forward</h3> <p>I am convinced that empowering business decision-makers to create inclusive business models will have a multiplier effect. When a few powerful people start moving, they all move eventually.</p> <p>We have not yet seen more women involved in decision-making processes despite the increasing support of business leaders and all the effort made to empower women. Empowering women does little good when women are part of a power system where profit and personal agendas are the true dictators of behavior.</p> <h3><em>"Empowering women does little good when women are part of a power system where profit and personal agendas are the true dictators of behavior."</em></h3> <p>It is time to stop launching actions for more justice, and start lobbying all leaders in public and private industry to commit to reducing homogeneity in decision-making and to building diverse stakeholder collaboration as a natural ’need-to-have’ element in their business models. This I believe will create a fundamental transformation that will contribute to a more ‘just food system’ for women…and everyone.<strong> </strong></p> <p>Download<strong> <a href="http://blogs.oxfam.org/sites/blogs.oxfam.org/files/Tinna-Nielsen_Oxfam-online-discussion.pdf">Stop Talking About Equality</a></strong><strong></strong><em><strong></strong></em></p></div><div class="field field-name-title"><h2>Day 6: Stop Talking About Equality</h2></div><ul class="links inline"><li class="translation_es first"><a href="http://l.blogs.oxfam/es/blogs/dejemos-de-hablar-de-igualdad" title="Día 6: Dejemos de hablar de igualdad" class="translation-link" xml:lang="es">Español</a></li> <li class="translation_fr last"><a href="http://l.blogs.oxfam/fr/blogs/cessez-de-parler-d%E2%80%99egalite" title="Jour 6: Cessez de parler d’égalité " class="translation-link" xml:lang="fr">Français</a></li> </ul> Mon, 26 Nov 2012 00:00:01 +0000 Tinna C. Nielsen 10410 at http://l.blogs.oxfam http://l.blogs.oxfam/en/blogs/stop-talking-about-equality#comments Jour 6: Cessez de parler d’égalité http://l.blogs.oxfam/en/node/10072 <div class="field field-name-body"><p><em><strong>Les chefs d’entreprise changent de comportement dès lors qu’ils y voient un intérêt pour eux et pour leurs entreprises. Si nous voulons qu’ils changent leur façon de faire des affaires, il faut cesser de parler de justice et d’égalité entre les sexes et, qu’à la place, nous leur montrions en quoi un système alimentaire plus équitable engendre des profits durables.</strong></em></p> <p>Par <a href="http://blogs.oxfam.org/fr/user/profile/tinna-c-nielsen"><strong>Tinna Nielsen</strong></a>, consultante en diversité et inclusion pour Arla Foods Amba<strong></strong></p> <p><strong>Les chefs d’entreprise changent de comportement dès lors qu’ils y voient un intérêt pour eux et pour leurs entreprises</strong>. Si nous voulons qu’ils changent leur façon de faire des affaires, il faut cesser de parler de justice et d’égalité entre les sexes et, qu’à la place, nous leur montrions en quoi un système alimentaire plus équitable engendre des profits durables.<strong></strong></p> <p>Dans le cadre de mon travail d’anthropologue économique au sein d’une entreprise laitière et agroalimentaire du secteur privé, j’ai observé comment un changement de discours pouvait entraîner un changement de comportement parmi les chefs d’entreprise, ce qui entraine à son tour une plus grande égalité entre les sexes. Le fait de détourner l’emphase de la « justice », des « femmes » et de la « responsabilité sociale » en faveur du « profit » est ce qui a le mieux fonctionné.</p> <p>Si nous nous attendons à ce que les entreprises du secteur privé contribuent au développement d’un système alimentaire qui est « juste pour les femmes », il faut que nous donnions les moyens aux personnes privilégiées de travailler autrement.</p> <h3>De « l’égalité » aux « résultats »</h3> <p>Tous les discours sont connotés, et dans le monde des affaires, les discours sur l’égalité des sexes et sur la responsabilité sociale des entreprises impliquent malheureusement d’aider les minorités pour le bien des minorités. Au cours des dernières décennies, cette approche n’a pas eu de grand impact sur la vie des femmes ou des personnes vivant en situation de pauvreté, ni n’a fait évoluer l’état d’esprit et le comportement des chefs d’entreprise.</p> <h3><em>"Les discours sur l’égalité des sexes et sur la responsabilité sociale des entreprises n’ont pas eu de grand impact sur la vie des femmes ou des personnes vivant en situation de pauvreté.</em></h3> <p><strong><a href="http://www.internationalbusinessreport.com/files/ibr2012%20-%20women%20in%20senior%20management%20master.pdf" rel="nofollow">Une étude de 2011</a></strong> révèle que les femmes détiennent actuellement 20 % des postes de direction au niveau mondial, contre 24 % en 2008. C’est seulement 1 point de plus qu’en 2004. À l’échelle mondiale, les femmes détiennent uniquement 9 % des postes de direction générale, même si la proportion de femmes sur le marché du travail et à des postes de cadre augmente continuellement. Il n’y a pas eu de réel progrès ces dernières années au niveau de la diversité de genre au sein des plus hautes sphères des corps institutionnels de prise de décisions, malgré un nombre grandissant d’entreprises instaurant l’égalité entre les sexes et des initiatives de diversité et d’inclusion.</p> <p>De part mon expérience, j’ai pu observer qu’en mettant l’accent sur les bénéfices commerciaux (de meilleurs résultats, des coûts réduits, des nouvelles parts de marché et des profits durables), on peut changer la mentalité et le comportement des dirigeants d’entreprise. Lorsque l’égalité et la diversité sont perçues comme favorisant le succès de l’entreprise – tels des leviers de performance plutôt que des objectifs en tant que tels – elles comptent aux yeux de ces mêmes dirigeants.</p> <p>Un tel contre-discours a fonctionné dans l’entreprise internationale où je travaille. Au lieu d’établir des objectifs pour l’égalité et la diversité, nous avons fixé un objectif stratégique sur la composition des équipes : chaque équipe, à tous les niveaux, ne doit compter plus de 70 % de personnes du même sexe, de la même génération, du même milieu ethnique ou de même nationalité, et du même domaine disciplinaire/de la même formation. Le raisonnement sous-jacent est qu’en encourageant l’hétérogénéité des points de vue et des perspectives, la performance augmente.</p> <p><a href="http://press.princeton.edu/titles/8353.html" rel="nofollow"><strong>Des études</strong></a> et les meilleures <a href="https://rowman.com/ISBN/9781442210455" rel="nofollow"><strong>pratiques</strong></a> ont prouvé que l’inclusion d’une diversité de perspectives et de milieux entraîne des solutions et décisions plus durables et innovantes, car des équipes diversifiées échangent plus d’informations, font de meilleures prévisions et adoptent une optique plus orientée vers le long terme. Cela peut avoir de profonds impacts pour les entreprises, ainsi que pour les producteurs et consommateurs.</p> <p>Au fil des années, j’ai pu constater que les premières personnes qui font la promotion de tels changements sont celles pour qui la diversité implique la synergie, l’innovation et la performance. Bien que la quête de justice sociale soit tout à fait louable, <a href="http://hbr.org/1996/09/making-differences-matter-a-new-paradigm-for-managing-diversity/ar/1" rel="nofollow"><strong>elle ne semble pas encourager</strong></a> les leaders à promouvoir plus de diversité au sein de leur entreprise. Au contraire, c’est plutôt l’argument commercial en faveur de la diversité et de l’intégration des femmes qui semble les pousser à agir.</p> <h3>La diversité favorise l’accès des femmes à l’alimentation</h3> <p>Bien que la diversité au sein des entreprises soit importante, elle ne suffit pas à provoquer à elle seule un changement significatif. Les entreprises doivent chercher à diversifier leurs chaînes d’approvisionnement et à cibler des consommateurs plus variés dans le cadre de leur processus d’innovation et de leur modèle d’affaires. Cela peut avoir un impact significatif sur la sécurité alimentaire et sur l’autonomisation des femmes vivant en situation de pauvreté.</p> <h3><em> "Les entreprises doivent chercher  à diversifier leurs chaînes d’approvisionnement et à cibler des consommateurs plus variés."</em></h3> <p>Par exemple, dans le cadre du processus d’innovation commerciale dans <a href="http://www.arla.com/" rel="nofollow"><strong>l’entreprise agroalimentaire internationale</strong></a> pour laquelle je travaille, nous avons consulté des personnes en situation de pauvreté en Afrique qui ne consommait pas les produits de l’entreprise. Cela a porté ses fruits à la fois pour l’entreprise et pour les femmes vivant en situation de pauvreté.</p> <p>Lorsque les dirigeants de l’entreprise ont appris que les femmes en situation de pauvreté n’avaient pas les moyens d’acheter du lait infantile en raison de son coût élevé, l’entreprise a décidé de produire du lait infantile en petit format, donc plus abordable. Les bébés n’ont pas été les seuls à bénéficier d’un accès plus sûr à la nourriture. Ces femmes, qui auparavant ne consommaient pas, ont soudain acquis le statut d’importantes consommatrices aux yeux de l’entreprise.</p> <p>Un autre exemple souligne comment la collaboration avec des petits producteurs en Afrique a donné aux dirigeants de l’entreprise de nouveaux enseignements sur la façon de maintenir les prix et les coûts stables. La volatilité du marché des fèves de cacao conduisait souvent les producteurs à changer de culture afin de survivre, ce qui engendrait indirectement une envolée des prix des fèves de cacao. L’entreprise s’est rendue compte qu’en contribuant à un meilleur niveau de vie en terme de sécurité alimentaire et d’éducation pour les familles de producteurs de fèves de cacao, elle pouvait éviter que les producteurs se dirigent vers l’industrie de l’huile de palme. Il y avait là clairement un argument commercial en faveur du maintien de prix d’approvisionnement stables dans un marché volatile.</p> <p>Certaines sociétés entreprennent ce genre de collaboration inclusive avec des petits producteurs dans le cadre de leurs engagements de responsabilité sociale. Je pense que davantage d’entreprises en feraient de même si l’argument de rentabilité leur était présenté.</p> <h3>Donnons aux personnes privilégiées les moyens d’agir</h3> <p>Les puissants chefs d’entreprises (qui s’avèrent être l’un des nombreux freins à un système alimentaire plus juste) ne se réveillent pas le matin en se demandant quel impact ils sont sur les personnes en situation de pauvreté et sur les petits producteurs dans les pays en développement. Pour que les chefs d’entreprises changent de comportement, il faut leur présenter un argument de rentabilité, et non un argument de responsabilité sociale.</p> <h3><em>"Pour que les chefs d’entreprises changent de comportement, il faut leur présenter un argument de rentabilité, et non un argument de responsabilité sociale."</em></h3> <p>Nous devons donc changer de discours : un système alimentaire juste est un système au sein duquel chacun a accès à la nourriture, car cela signifie plus de consommateurs et des profits plus durables pour les entreprises alimentaires.</p> <p>Nous devons changer la manière dont les personnes privilégiées gouvernent leurs actions. Cela commence par du développement personnel, pour que les dirigeants d’entreprises ainsi que leurs employés acquièrent une nouvelle conscience du monde. Ils ne changeront pas fondamentalement leurs entreprises et leurs façons de commercer tant qu’ils ne se rendront pas compte de l’importance de consulter et de travailler avec des personnes différentes d’eux-mêmes sur le marché international</p> <h3>Pour avancer</h3> <p>Je suis convaincue qu’en donnant aux leaders du secteur privé les moyen de créer des modèles d’affaires plus inclusifs, cela aura un effet multiplicateur. Il suffira d’un changement chez quelques puissants dirigeants pour que tout le secteur finisse par changer.</p> <p>Jusqu’à présent nous n’avons pas vu le nombre de femmes à des postes de direction augmenter malgré tous les efforts réalisés pour favoriser leur représentation. Ces efforts ont peu d’effet lorsque celles-ci font partie d’un système de pouvoir où le profit et les ambitions personnelles sont les vrais dictateurs du comportement.</p> <h3><em>"Ces efforts ont peu d’effet lorsque celles-ci font partie d’un système de pouvoir où le profit et les ambitions personnelles sont les vrais dictateurs du comportement."</em></h3> <p>Il est temps de cesser de lancer des initiatives au nom de la justice. Il faut plutôt faire pression sur les dirigeants des secteurs public et privé pour qu’ils s’engagent à réduire l’homogénéité chez ceux qui sont responsables de la prise de décision. La collaboration avec une diversité de parties prenantes doit devenir un pilier central de leur modèle d’affaires.</p> <p>Cela engendrera, je le pense, une transformation fondamentale qui contribuera à un système alimentaire « plus juste » pour les femmes... et pour tous.<strong></strong><strong></strong><em><strong></strong></em></p> <p>Téléchargez l'article :<strong></strong><strong> </strong><a href="http://blogs.oxfam.org/sites/blogs.oxfam.org/files/Tinna-Nielsen_Discussion-en-ligne-Oxfam.pdf"><strong>Cessez de parler d’égalité</strong></a><em><strong><a href="http://blogs.oxfam.org/sites/blogs.oxfam.org/files/Tinna-Nielsen_Discussion-en-ligne-Oxfam.pdf"> </a></strong></em></p></div><div class="field field-name-title"><h2>Jour 6: Cessez de parler d’égalité </h2></div><ul class="links inline"><li class="translation_es first"><a href="http://l.blogs.oxfam/es/blogs/dejemos-de-hablar-de-igualdad" title="Día 6: Dejemos de hablar de igualdad" class="translation-link" xml:lang="es">Español</a></li> <li class="translation_en last"><a href="http://l.blogs.oxfam/en/blogs/stop-talking-about-equality" title="Day 6: Stop Talking About Equality" class="translation-link" xml:lang="en">English</a></li> </ul> Mon, 26 Nov 2012 00:00:01 +0000 Tinna C. Nielsen 10072 at http://l.blogs.oxfam http://l.blogs.oxfam/en/node/10072#comments Día 6: Dejemos de hablar de igualdad http://l.blogs.oxfam/en/node/10071 <div class="field field-name-body"><p><em><strong>Los grandes empresarios cambian de actitud cuando ven una oportunidad para ellos o sus negocios. Si queremos que cambien la manera en la que operan, tenemos que dejar de hablar de justicia o igualdad de género y en su lugar demostrar que un sistema alimentario más justo se traduce en beneficios duraderos.</strong></em></p> <p>Por <strong><a href="http://blogs.oxfam.org/es/user/profile/tinna-c-nielsen">Tinna Nielsen</a></strong>, consultora principal de Diversidad e Inclusión <strong></strong></p> <p><strong>Los grandes empresarios cambian de actitud cuando ven una oportunidad para ellos o sus negocios</strong>. Si queremos que cambien la manera en la que operan, tenemos que dejar de hablar de justicia o igualdad de género y en lugar de ello mostrar que un sistema alimentario más justo se traduce en beneficios duraderos.</p> <p>En mi trabajo como antropóloga en una empresa alimentaria y de productos lácteos del sector privado, he podido comprobar que un cambio en el discurso puede producir un cambio en el comportamiento de los dirigentes empresariales, que a su vez conduce a una mayor igualdad de género. Resulta interesante comprobar que desviar la atención de las palabras “justicia”, “mujeres” y “responsabilidad social” y centrarnos en “beneficio” ha dado resultado. Si queremos que las empresas del sector privado contribuyan al desarrollo de “un sistema alimentario justo para las mujeres”, tenemos que potenciar la capacidad de las personas privilegiadas para que desarrollen nuevas formas de trabajar.</p> <h3>De “igualdad” a “rendimiento”</h3> <p>Todos los discursos tienen connotaciones y, en el mundo empresarial, los discursos sobre igualdad de género y responsabilidad social corporativa desafortunadamente dan a entender que uno ayuda a la minoría por el bien de la minoría. Durante varias décadas, este planteamiento no ha producido un impacto positivo apreciable para las mujeres o las personas que viven en la pobreza, ni tampoco ha cambiado la mentalidad y el comportamiento de los grandes empresarios.</p> <h3><em>"Los discursos sobre igualdad de género y responsabilidad social corporativa no han producido un impacto positivo apreciable para las mujeres o las personas que viven en la pobreza.</em>"</h3> <p><a href="http://www.internationalbusinessreport.com/files/ibr2012%20-%20women%20in%20senior%20management%20master.pdf" rel="nofollow"><strong>Una investigación de 2011</strong></a> revela que las mujeres actualmente ocupan el 20 por ciento de los altos cargos en el mundo frente al 24 por ciento en 2009, y tan sólo un 1 por ciento más respecto a 2004. A escala mundial, las mujeres solo ostentan el 9 por ciento de los puestos directivos a pesar de que la proporción de mujeres en el mercado laboral y en los puestos de dirección continúa aumentando. En los últimos años no se ha observado un progreso real en lo que respecta a la diversidad de género en las más altas esferas empresariales, a pesar de que cada vez más empresas van incorporando iniciativas para promover la igualdad de género, la inclusión y la diversidad.</p> <p>Según mi experiencia, al hacer énfasis en los beneficios para las empresas (mayor rendimiento, reducción de costos, nuevas cuotas de mercado y beneficios sostenibles) podemos cambiar la mentalidad y el comportamiento de los dirigentes empresariales. Cuando la igualdad y la diversidad se perciben como palancas que favorezcan mayor rendimiento en lugar de los objetivos en sí, entonces los líderes empresariales las tienen en cuenta.</p> <p>Tal contra-discurso ha funcionado en la multinacional en la que trabajo. En lugar de establecer objetivos para la igualdad o la diversidad, hemos establecido un objetivo estratégico en cuanto a la composición de los equipos: en todos los niveles y funciones ningún equipo puede estar compuesto por más del 70 por ciento de personas del mismo género, generación, nacionalidad, origen étnico, formación o disciplina. El fundamento empresarial es que la reducción de homogeneidad en las opiniones y perspectivas mejora el rendimiento.</p> <p>Se ha probado mediante <a href="http://press.princeton.edu/titles/8353.html" rel="nofollow"><strong>investigaciones</strong></a> y <a href="https://rowman.com/ISBN/9781442210455" rel="nofollow"><strong>experiencia</strong></a> que la inclusión de una diversidad de perspectivas y orígenes conduce a soluciones y decisiones más sostenibles e innovadoras, ya que los equipos diversos procesan más información, hacen mejores predicciones y adoptan una perspectiva de más largo plazo. Esto puede generar un gran impacto positivo tanto para las empresas como para los productores y consumidores.</p> <p>A lo largo de los años, he podido comprobar que los primeros que toman la iniciativa en semejante proceso de cambio son aquellos que relacionan la diversidad con sinergia, innovación y rendimiento. Si bien la justicia y la igualdad son valores loables, no parece que vayan a generar las expectativas adecuadas para que se materialiceel <a href="http://hbr.org/1996/09/making-differences-matter-a-new-paradigm-for-managing-diversity/ar/1" rel="nofollow"><strong>beneficio de la diversidad</strong></a>, algo que sí ocurre en el caso de la diversidad y la inclusión de las mujeres.</p> <h3>La diversidad favorece el acceso de las mujeres a los alimentos</h3> <p>Si bien la diversidad en la mano de obra es importante, no es de por sí suficiente para conseguir un cambio significativo. Las empresas deben intentar fomentar la diversidad en sus cadenas de suministro y dirigirse a un grupo más heterogéneo de consumidores como parte integral de su proceso de innovación y su modelo de negocio. Esto puede tener un impacto significativo en materia de seguridad alimentaria y en la potenciación de la autonomía de las mujeres que viven en la pobreza.</p> <h3><em> "Las empresas deben intentar fomentar la diversidad en sus cadenas de suministro y dirigirse a un grupo más heterogéneo de consumidores."</em></h3> <p>Por ejemplo, en <a href="http://www.arla.com/" rel="nofollow"><strong>la multinacional alimentaria</strong></a> donde trabajo, el proceso de innovación empresarial ha incluido la consulta a personas no consumidoras que viven en la pobreza en África , lo que ha tenido un efecto positivo tanto para la empresa como para las mujeres en situación de pobreza. Los dirigentes de la empresa constataron que las mujeres en situación de pobreza no podían comprar la leche de fórmula para lactantes, por lo que la empresa comenzó a producir pequeños envases de uso diario que las madres sí podían permitirse, en lugar de envases grandes que estaban fuera de sus posibilidades. Esta medida no sólo mejoró la alimentación de sus bebés, sino que estas mujeres, que no eran consumidoras, de repente adquirieron el estatus de consumidoras de importancia a ojos de la empresa.</p> <p>Otro ejemplo es cómo la colaboración con los pequeños productores y productoras de granos de cacao en África ha ofrecido nuevas percepciones a los dirigentes empresariales en cuanto a la meta de mantener la estabilidad de precios y costes. El carácter volátil de la industria del cacao llevaba los agricultores y agricultoras a cambiar de cultivo para sobrevivir, lo que hacía que los precios de los granos de cacao aumentaran de manera indirecta. La empresa se dio cuenta de que si contribuiría a mejorar el nivel de vida de los agricultores y agricultoras, en términos de seguridad alimentaria y educación para sus familias, podía efectivamente evitar que ellos abandonasen el cultivo del cacao por el de la palma aceitera. Había un argumento empresarial claro fundamentado en el objetivo de mantener los precios de suministro estables en un mercado volátil.</p> <p>Algunas empresas se embarcan en este tipo de colaboración inclusiva con pequeños productores y productoras de alimentos como parte de sus compromisos de responsabilidad corporativa, pero se me hace que más empresas lo harían si la colaboración estuviera respaldada por un razonamiento empresarial.</p> <h3>Potenciar el desarrollo de las personas privilegiadas</h3> <p>Los poderosos dirigentes empresariales que constituyen uno de los obstáculos a la construcción de un sistema alimentario justo no se despiertan por la mañana pensando en cómo ellos y sus acciones repercuten en la vida de personas que viven en la pobreza o en la de mujeres agricultoras en los países en desarrollo. Para que estos dirigentes cambien su comportamiento, es necesario enfocar el argumento hacia los beneficios y las cuotas de mercado, y no hacia la responsabilidad social. Por este motivo, tenemos que reorientar nuestro discurso: un sistema alimentario justo es aquel en el que todas las personas tienen acceso a los alimentos, porque esto se traduce en más consumidores y beneficios más duraderos para las empresas.</p> <h3><em>"Para que estos dirigentes cambien su comportamiento, es necesario enfocar el argumento hacia los beneficios y las cuotas de mercado, y no hacia la responsabilidad social."</em></h3> <p>Debemos cambiar las herramientas que utilizan las personas privilegiados para “dirigir” sus acciones. Esto comienza por un desarrollo personal, para cambiar la visión del mundo que tienen los dirigentes empresariales y el personal a su cargo. Sólo transformarán de manera fundamental sus organizaciones y sus prácticas empresariales si son conscientes del valor de incluir y trabajar con personas diferentes a ellos mismos en el mercado mundial.</p> <h3>El futuro</h3> <p>Estoy convencida de que fomentar el desarrollo personal de los dirigentes empresariales para que creen modelos de negocios inclusivos tendrá un efecto multiplicador. Bastará que algunos dirigentes con poder tomen la iniciativa para que el resto acabe sumándose.</p> <p>A pesar del creciente apoyo de los dirigentes empresariales y de los esfuerzos para otorgar poder a las mujeres, todavía no hemos percibido un incremento del número de mujeres implicadas en la toma de decisiones. Otorgar poder a las mujeres no sirve de mucho cuando forman parte de un sistema de poder donde los beneficios y las agendas personales son los que verdaderamente dictan las pautas de comportamiento.</p> <h3><em>"Otorgar poder a las mujeres no sirve de mucho cuando forman parte de un sistema de poder donde los beneficios y las agendas personales son los que verdaderamente dictan las pautas de comportamiento."</em></h3> <p>Es hora de cesar las acciones destinadas a lograr más justicia y comenzar a ejercer presión a los líderes empresariales tanto del sector privado como del público para que se comprometan a reducir la homogeneidad en la toma de decisiones y fomentar la colaboración entre las diversas partes interesadas como elemento natural y necesario en sus modelos empresariales. Creo que esto producirá un cambio fundamental que contribuirá a construir un “sistema alimentario más justo” para las mujeres... y para todo el mundo.<strong></strong></p> <p>Lee el ensayo:  <strong><a href="http://blogs.oxfam.org/sites/blogs.oxfam.org/files/Tinna-Nielsen_Discusion-virtual-de-Oxfam.pdf">Dejemos de hablar de igualdad</a> </strong></p></div><div class="field field-name-title"><h2>Día 6: Dejemos de hablar de igualdad</h2></div><ul class="links inline"><li class="translation_fr first"><a href="http://l.blogs.oxfam/fr/blogs/cessez-de-parler-d%E2%80%99egalite" title="Jour 6: Cessez de parler d’égalité " class="translation-link" xml:lang="fr">Français</a></li> <li class="translation_en last"><a href="http://l.blogs.oxfam/en/blogs/stop-talking-about-equality" title="Day 6: Stop Talking About Equality" class="translation-link" xml:lang="en">English</a></li> </ul> Mon, 26 Nov 2012 00:00:01 +0000 Tinna C. Nielsen 10071 at http://l.blogs.oxfam http://l.blogs.oxfam/en/node/10071#comments