innovation

Man with his packed donkey in Kosht epa valley, Afghanistan

Blog: Day 7: Farmers do not come from Mars

If poor farmers had more freedom to innovate and adequate access to public and private investments, they would likely disappoint us by getting out of farming altogether. But even if only one or two in five remained, they would change the world for the better, literally.

By Julio A. Berdegué, Principal Researcher, Latin American Centre for Rural Development (RIMISP)

Homme avec son âne emballé dans la vallée Kosht epa, en Afghanistan

Blog: Jour 7: Les agriculteurs ne viennent pas de Mars

Si les agriculteurs pauvres avaient plus de liberté pour innover et un accès adéquat aux investissements publics et privés, ils nous décevraient probablement en quittant le milieu agricole pour de bon. Mais si seulement un ou deux sur cinq restaient, ils changeraient le monde pour le mieux, littéralement.

Par Julio A. Berdegué, chercheur principal, Centre d’Amérique Latine de développement rural (RIMISP

Revolution. Image: Oxfam

Blog: Day 2: How Institutional Reform Saved Agriculture—and Us!

In the world of 2050, healthy food is abundant and politicians view a sustainable agricultural system as non-negotiable. Looking back, it’s clear that institutional reform was the key to success in the realms of innovation, production, and consumption.

By John Ambler, Vice-President for Strategy, Oxfam America

Blog: Up in Smoke : cinq courts-métrages pour des solutions durables

La campagne CULTIVONS promeut les solutions pour un avenir durable dans lequel tout le monde peut manger à sa faim. C’est pourquoi chez Oxfam, nous soutenons la réalisation d’une série de courts-métrages sur une technique agricole qui, expérimentée au Honduras, promet d’aider les paysan-ne-s à sortir du cycle de l’agriculture sur brûlis.

Blog: Up in Smoke: 5 Oxfam shorts

The GROW campaign is all about solutions for a sustainable future in which we all have enough to eat. This is why we at Oxfam supported the making of this series of short films about an agricultural technique pioneered in Honduras that promises to help small holder farmers escape the cycle of ‘slash and burn’ agriculture. This traditional practice involves farmers regularly moving the areas that they farm and ‘slashing and burning’ the vegetation to fertilize the soil.

Subscribe to RSS - innovation