Oxfam International Blogs - Jordan http://l.blogs.oxfam/fr/tags/jordan fr These five Oxfam innovations are changing the way people fight poverty http://l.blogs.oxfam/fr/node/81835 <div class="field field-name-body"><p><strong>From futuristic homes that adjust to extreme temperatures to apps that allow refugees to speak up for their own needs, here are just a few of the creative solutions implemented by Oxfam and our partners on the ground to help vulnerable communities take on new obstacles.</strong></p><p>What comes to mind when you imagine the word innovation? Is it a shiny new gadget, a hack, or an app that helps you get whatever you need at a touch of button? Or, maybe it’s a new way of seeing things?</p><p>Oxfam thinks of innovations as solutions to problems that are keeping people in poverty. Here’s a look at some of the tools, programs, and yes, even apps, we developed this year to help tackle some of the challenges faced by people we work with.</p><div><h3>Managing waste in Bangladesh</h3></div><div><strong><img alt="The Oxfam in Bangladesh team celebrates the installation of a centralized waste treatment plant in Cox&#039;s Bazar. Photo: Salahuddin Ahmmed/Oxfam" title="The Oxfam in Bangladesh team celebrates the installation of a centralized waste treatment plant in Cox&#039;s Bazar. Photo: Salahuddin Ahmmed/Oxfam" height="1350" width="2160" class="media-element file-default" data-delta="2" typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://l.blogs.oxfam/sites/default/files/bangladesh-waste-team_edit_5.jpg" /></strong></div><div><span>&nbsp;</span></div><div><em>The Oxfam in Bangladesh team celebrates the installation of a centralized waste treatment plant in Cox's Bazar. Photo: Salahuddin Ahmmed/Oxfam</em><p>When an influx of people in a temporary refuge creates demand for latrines, and then pit latrines start to fill up, how do you treat all the waste?</p><p>That was the question facing Oxfam in Bangladesh earlier this year—which has been providing water, sanitation, and hygiene support to more than 266,000 Rohingya refugees in Cox’s Bazar since 2017.</p><p>In November 2018, the team in Bangladesh built an industrial-scale centralized sewage management plant at Cox’s Bazar with the capacity to process the human waste of 150,000 people. The process is completely environmentally friendly, and to our knowledge, this has been the first successful attempt to carry out something of this scale in a refugee camp.</p><h3>Growing barley grass in the desert</h3><p><img alt="Hydroponics project developed by Oxfam engineer and Sahrawi refugee Taleb Brahim. Photo: Tineke D&#039;haese/Oxfam" title="Hydroponics project developed by Oxfam engineer and Sahrawi refugee Taleb Brahim. Photo: Tineke D&#039;haese/Oxfam" height="531" width="850" class="media-element file-default" data-delta="5" typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://l.blogs.oxfam/sites/default/files/hydro_brhaim6084scr_4_1.jpg" /></p><p><span><i></i></span><span><i>Hydroponics project developed by Oxfam engineer and Sahrawi refugee Taleb Brahim. Photo: Tineke D'haese/Oxfam</i></span></p><p><span>In the harsh climate of the western Sahara, it is nearly impossible to grow anything naturally. There are frequent sandstorms, and temperatures can exceed a blistering 122 degrees.&nbsp;</span></p><p>Sahrawi refugees from western Algeria have been living in camps there for more than 40 years, and one-quarter of them face chronic malnutrition. Food assistance helps, but it’s not a long-term solution.</p><p>In 2017, <a href="https://stories.oxfamamerica.org/stories/sahrawi-refugees-hydroponics-program" rel="nofollow">Oxfam started a hydroponics program</a>—using a technique for cultivating plants that doesn’t require soil—to feed the goats the camps’ residents depend on for milk, meat, and income.&nbsp;</p><p>So far, the project has yielded sweet success with greenhouses producing about 132 pounds of fodder each day—enough to feed 20 goats.</p><h3>Rice farming goes digital</h3><p><strong><img alt="Development and Partnership in Action (DPA) is one of Oxfam&#039;s partners on the ground implementing the BlocRice project. Photo provided by: Development and Partnership in Action" title="Development and Partnership in Action (DPA) is one of Oxfam&#039;s partners on the ground implementing the BlocRice project. Photo provided by: Development and Partnership in Action" height="670" width="1072" class="media-element file-default" data-delta="3" typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://l.blogs.oxfam/sites/default/files/rice_farming-orig_c-2.jpg" /></strong></p><p><em>Development and Partnership in Action (DPA) is one of Oxfam's partners on the ground implementing the BlocRice project. Photo provided by: Development and Partnership in Action</em></p><p>In November 2018, <a href="https://www.ccn.com/global-charity-oxfam-launches-blockchain-project-to-empower-cambodian-rice-farmers/" rel="nofollow">Oxfam launched BlocRice</a>, a program that aims to empower rice farmers in Cambodia to increase their negotiation power for better and fairer pay. The initiative will use digital contracts between rice farmers who are working in agricultural cooperatives, exporters in Cambodia, and buyers in the Netherlands.</p><p>These contracts are tools for social and economic empowerment, Solinn Lim, Oxfam in Cambodia’s program director, explained at the launch, “Farmers thus gain collective bargaining power since agricultural cooperatives will be parties to the contracts.”</p><h3>An app for when words fail</h3><p><strong><img alt="The app helps aid workers address the needs of Rohingya people living in severely crowded makeshift camps in Cox’s Bazar. Photo: Kelsey-Rae Taylor/Oxfam" title="The app helps aid workers address the needs of Rohingya people living in severely crowded makeshift camps in Cox’s Bazar. Photo: Kelsey-Rae Taylor/Oxfam" height="1280" width="2048" class="media-element file-default" data-delta="4" typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://l.blogs.oxfam/sites/default/files/app-112267lpr_orig_c-3.jpg" /></strong></p><p><em>The app helps aid workers address the needs of the nearly one million Rohingya people who are living in severely crowded conditions in makeshift camps in Cox’s Bazar. Photo: Kelsey-Rae Taylor/Oxfam</em></p><p>Aid workers in Cox’s Bazar, Bangladesh, encountered a challenge working with Rohingya refugees, whose language is similar but not close enough to the local dialect to ensure effective communication.</p><p>With nearly one million refugees living in Cox’s Bazar, it is imperative that nongovernmental organizations clearly communicate with the refugees to allow them to speak for themselves.</p><p>That’s why in June, Oxfam, Translators without Borders, and UNICEF released a <a href="http://glossaries.translatorswb.org/bangladesh" rel="nofollow">glossary app</a> with translations in the five languages spoken in the camps: Bangla, Burmese, Chittagonian, English, and Rohingya. The app is helping Oxfam and others on the ground address the needs of the Rohingya population.</p><h3>Homes designed to be out of this world</h3><iframe width="640" height="360" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/ECocDnMkdmQ" frameborder="0" allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen=""></iframe><p>A <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ECocDnMkdmQ" rel="nofollow">new construction project called the SuperAdobe</a> is taking shape in Jordan’s Za’atari refugee camp, in which freely available materials—such as sandbags and barbed wires—are used to build simple shelters.</p><p>These temporary houses are more comfortable, environmentally friendly, and more liveable than the current caravans refugees inhabit.</p><p>Most importantly, the SuperAdobes are warm in the winter and cool in the summer, a necessity in a desert environment where summer temperatures reach as high as 104 degrees.</p></div><p><strong>Join Oxfam in tackling the root causes of poverty. <a href="https://www.oxfam.org//donate" rel="nofollow">Donate now</a></strong></p><p><em><span>This entry posted on 5 January 2019, by Divya Amladi.</span></em></p><p><em>Top photo: Diaa', a Syrian refugee living in the Za'atari Camp, is a team supervisor in the Superadobe construction project that is bringing temperature-resistant homes to the camp. Credit: Nesma Nsour/Oxfam</em></p><p></p></div><div class="field field-name-title"><h2>These five Oxfam innovations are changing the way people fight poverty</h2></div> Sat, 05 Jan 2019 13:05:58 +0000 Guest Blogger 81835 at http://l.blogs.oxfam http://l.blogs.oxfam/fr/node/81835#comments How one community in Jordan is raising women's voices - and ensuring clean water is not wasted http://l.blogs.oxfam/fr/node/81461 <div class="field field-name-body"><p><strong>With the support of Global Affairs Canada, Oxfam is working with community members, partners, and the Government of Jordan to improve water governance. And now the voices of the community's women are being heard.</strong></p><p>In Jordan, it is not common for government and citizens to talk face to face on issues of common concern. There is also <a href="https://reader.chathamhouse.org/new-social-enterprises-jordan-redefining-meaning-civil-society" rel="nofollow">skepticism on the role</a> of civil society.</p><p>Together with the Water Authority of Jordan, a group of people in Salt governorate, Jordan are working to change that.</p><p>Abir Suleiman Mrooj, Buthaina Al-Zubi, and Majde Algharagher are three of the twelve men and women who comprise a water community group in the town of Allan, Salt. Now, people of Salt can collaborate freely with government officials, air their grievances, and work together to improve water access and governance in their community.</p><p><img alt="Majde Algharagher and Buthaina Al-Zubi, working together to save water in Allan, Salt governorate, Jordan. Photo: Alixandra Buck" title="Majde Algharagher and Buthaina Al-Zubi, working together to save water in Allan, Salt governorate, Jordan. Photo: Alixandra Buck" height="827" width="1240" class="media-element file-default" data-delta="2" typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://l.blogs.oxfam/sites/default/files/majde-and-buthaina-credit-alixandra-buck-1240.jpg" /></p><p><em>Majde Algharagher and Buthaina Al-Zubi, working together to save water in Allan, Salt governorate, Jordan. Photo: Alixandra Buck</em></p><p>Rapid population growth, a mountainous landscape and neglect have frequently left people in Allan with insufficient access to water. Community members, including Mrooj and Al-Zubi, highlighted the issues to Algharagher, the Water Authority’s Director of Salt District. In turn he was able to convince the Water Authority to respond with extensive improvements to the local water network, valued at over 150,000 JOD (approximately $210,000 USD). Now, leakages in Allan have been reduced significantly - and further improvements are expected to cut back losses even more.</p><p>This is of particular importance in Jordan, one of the most water-scarce countries in the world. Water use far exceeds the replacement rate, and leaks, breakages and interrupted water supply are all too common - pointing to the need for systemic changes to water infrastructure, water governance and water use patterns.</p><p>Majde Algharagher was quick to recognize the issues: “There has been a huge increase in population in Jordan, so there is less water available per person,” he told Oxfam. “We are also seeing illegal pumping, which is making water even scarcer.”</p><p><img alt="Majde Algharagher, the Director of Salt District for the Water Authority of Jordan, speaks with community members. Photo: Alixandra Buck/Oxfam" title="Majde Algharagher, the Director of Salt District for the Water Authority of Jordan, speaks with community members. Photo: Alixandra Buck/Oxfam" height="827" width="1240" class="media-element file-default" data-delta="3" typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://l.blogs.oxfam/sites/default/files/majde-credit-alixandra-buck-1240.jpg" /></p><p><em>Majde Algharagher, the Director of Salt District for the Water Authority of Jordan, speaks with community members. Photo: Alixandra Buck/Oxfam</em></p><p><strong>Over 40% of water in Jordan’s network</strong> is <a href="https://www.usaid.gov/jordan/water-and-wastewater-infrastructure" rel="nofollow">lost through leakages</a> and other losses.</p><p>Abir Suleiman Mrooj, of Allan, told Oxfam, “The sight of wasted water all over the streets used to hurt us, as we were working so hard to save water in our homes... So at first, we were like a beehive around Mr. Algharagher – always pushing until we got a solution to each issue.”</p><p><strong>Collaborating with the community</strong> has made it easier for the Water Authority to find and stop water losses. According to Algharagher, “Now that I am in the water group, people can contact me directly by phone. Before they had to come to the office or call the ministry and it would be a long process to speak to me. We also have a Whatsapp group, so they can send me a picture of a broken pipe or any problem, and I can respond. I can immediately send maintenance staff, and they can fix it. The response is easier and faster than before.”</p><p><img alt="Abir Suleiman Mrooj, a water Ambassador from Salt, Jordan, is a leader in her community. Photo Alixandra Buck/Oxfam" title="Abir Suleiman Mrooj, a water Ambassador from Salt, Jordan, is a leader in her community. Photo Alixandra Buck/Oxfam" height="827" width="1240" class="media-element file-default" data-delta="1" typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://l.blogs.oxfam/sites/default/files/abir-credit-alixandra-buck-1240.jpg" /></p><p><em>Abir Suleiman Mrooj, a water Ambassador from Salt, Jordan, is a leader in her community. Photo Alixandra Buck/Oxfam</em></p><p><strong>Mrooj told Oxfam, “We housewives were able to achieve something</strong> for our community. The Water Authority heard my voice, and through me, the voices of many people in Jordan. We feel so proud that we could impact our community and the government.”</p><p>But things are still not perfect: “Now, my water is good. But honestly, other places still struggle.”</p><p>With the support of <a href="http://www.international.gc.ca/international/index.aspx?lang=eng" rel="nofollow">Global Affairs Canada</a>, Oxfam is working with community members, partners, and the Government of Jordan to improve water governance. We want to ensure that more people in the country can meet their basic water needs and participate in decision-making at the community and national level.</p><p><em>This entry posted by Alixandra Buck, Communications Advisor, Oxfam in Jordan, on 29 March 2018.</em></p><p><em>Top photo: A water community group meeting in Allan, Salt governorate, Jordan. Credit: Alixandra Buck/Oxfam<br></em></p><p><strong>Read <a href="https://blogs.oxfam.org/en/search/node/jordan">more blogs about Jordan</a><br>Read <a href="https://www.oxfam.org/en/jordan" rel="nofollow">more about Oxfam's work in Jordan</a></strong></p><p></p></div><div class="field field-name-title"><h2>How one community in Jordan is raising women&#039;s voices - and ensuring clean water is not wasted</h2></div> Thu, 29 Mar 2018 15:17:11 +0000 Guest Blogger 81461 at http://l.blogs.oxfam http://l.blogs.oxfam/fr/node/81461#comments Syria: wealthy governments meeting in Kuwait hold the key to survival for millions http://l.blogs.oxfam/fr/node/26047 <div class="field field-name-body"><p>It is difficult not to feel overwhelmed in the face of the crisis that has engulfed Syria and spilt across its borders. With no end to the fighting in sight and spiraling humanitarian needs across the region, <a href="http://reliefweb.int/report/syrian-arab-republic/kuwait-un-officials-pin-high-hopes-syrias-donors-conf" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">governments meeting in Kuwait this week</a> to discuss the humanitarian response are unlikely to be arriving full of optimism. But the funds they pledge will have a real impact on increasingly vulnerable people’s lives and donors need to come together to send a clear signal to the people of Syria: “<a href="https://www.withsyria.com/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">we will not abandon you</a>.”</p> <p><strong>We have already seen cuts to vital humanitarian assistance</strong> resulting from a significant funding shortfall - last year’s UN and Red Cross appeals to help those in need were <a href="https://www.oxfam.org/en/pressroom/pressreleases/2015-03-30/international-appeals-syria-crisis-less-10-funded" rel="nofollow">only 62.5% funded </a>by the end of 2014.</p> <p>The cuts have stung people like Abu Ali and Um Ali who fled Syria in 2012 and live with their children in a make-shift settlement in Lebanon’s Bekaa Valley. "Without World Food Programme vouchers, we couldn’t have survived all this time,” Abu Ali told us, “but one day, we received an SMS telling us that we won't get food anymore. The same thing happened with fuel vouchers. In our settlement, only 3 families received one this winter, while we all did in 2013."</p> <p><img alt="Abu Ali and Um Ali fled Syria in 2012, now live with their children in a make-shift settlement in Lebanon’s Bekaa Valley. Credit: Yasmine Chawaf/Oxfam" title="Abu Ali and Um Ali fled Syria in 2012, now live with their children in a make-shift settlement in Lebanon’s Bekaa Valley. Credit: Yasmine Chawaf/Oxfam" height="593" width="854" class="media-element file-default" typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://l.blogs.oxfam/sites/default/files/91614-family-food-vouchers-abu-ali-family-lebanon-bekaa-valley-854.jpg" /></p> <p><strong>Eighteen million people are now in urgent need of assistance</strong> – a staggering number, including families across Syria, refugees forced to leave everything behind as well as the poorest people in Syria’s neighbouring countries who have been pushed further below the poverty line by the crisis. Eighteen million people who need the equivalent of a little over a dollar a day to keep going. To date, <strong>less than 10c of every dollar needed has been committed to 2015 humanitarian appeals</strong>, so there is a long way to go. This is the absolute minimum that the international community must ensure this year, while putting their backs into efforts to resolve the conflict and avoid a yawning future of further suffering.</p> <p><strong>Donors need to find a way to dig deeper than <a href="https://www.oxfam.org/en/pressroom/reactions/despite-generous-pledges-kuwait-donor-conference-syria-falls-short-vast" rel="nofollow">last year</a></strong> as more and more people are lacking real basics like food, water and adequate shelter while infrastructure, healthcare and education services across the region are showing signs of extreme strain.</p> <p>The greatest burden of responding to the crisis has fallen on the countries neighbouring Syria – such as Lebanon, where refugees equating to nearly 30% of the country’s population are seeking sanctuary. Many much wealthier countries have failed to step up and provide sufficient help - this is clearly unfair.</p> <h3>Oxfam's Syria Crisis Fair Share Analysis</h3> <p>At Oxfam, we’ve tried to come up with a way of measuring what an<a href="https://www.oxfam.org/en/research/syria-crisis-fair-share-analysis-2015" rel="nofollow"> “equitable” share of the humanitarian response would look like</a> for the world’s wealthy donor states, based on the size of their economies. In 2014, nearly half of the top donors gave well below their “fair share” including including <strong>Russia </strong>(7%), <strong>Australia </strong>(28%) and <strong>Japan </strong>(29%). In contrast, <strong>Kuwait</strong>, the host of the donor conference, gave 1107% of their share. So far this year, the <strong>UK </strong>is the only government to have given their fair share for 2015.</p> <p>Several states have led the way in providing not only their fair share of aid last year, but also pledging significant numbers of places for <a href="https://www.oxfam.org/sites/www.oxfam.org/files/bp-syria-refugee-resettlement-geneva-en.pdf" rel="nofollow">resettlement or other forms of humanitarian admission </a>for the most vulnerable refugees from Syria whose needs cannot be met in the region. <strong>Germany, Norway, Canada, Sweden and Switzerland all committed to delivering their fair share</strong> of both aid and resettlement.</p> <p><img alt="Syrian refugees in Lebanon’s Bekaa Valley, March 2015. Photo: Yasmine Chawaf/Oxfam" title="Syrian refugees in Lebanon’s Bekaa Valley, March 2015. Photo: Yasmine Chawaf/Oxfam" height="686" width="1024" class="media-element file-default" typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://l.blogs.oxfam/sites/default/files/91615lpr-syrian-refugees-lebanon-mar2015-yasmine-chawaf-oxfam-1024.jpg" /></p> <p>The people that Oxfam works with across Jordan, Lebanon and in Syria do not want to rely on hand-outs. But with extremely limited opportunities to work, many have no other option.</p> <p><strong>In neighbouring countries, decreasing aid is also coupled with the impact of restrictive government policies</strong> that have been introduced under the pressure of the crisis, including the withdrawal of access to free healthcare in Jordan and expensive visa renewals in Lebanon that most families can ill-afford, with no option to quickly cross back into Syria to renew their visas given new restrictions at the border. Unless the international community can come together to turn things around, it is inevitable that more people are going to be left with increasingly ugly choices in a bid for survival such as early marriage, sending their children out to work in informal markets or making a dangerous journey across the Mediterranean in search of safety.</p> <p>Fears are certainly growing. Emad, a refugee from Damascus now living in Jordan told my colleagues: “We Syrians are scared to work because if you’re caught they will send you back to Syria without letting you either call anyone or take anything with you. The first time, they will make you sign a document promising you won’t do it again, and the second time, you’re out.”</p> <p>Governments need to put their heads together with international organisations and come up with <a href="http://www.theguardian.com/global-development-professionals-network/2015/mar/16/12-ways-to-ensure-more-secure-future-for-syria-refugees" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">new approaches</a> to ensure that their support is sustainable.</p> <p>Returning refugees to Syria is absolutely not an option as the unpredictable <a href="https://blogs.oxfam.org/en/blogs/15-03-25-syria-stain-conscience-world">conflict continues to rage</a>. Creativity is going to be needed to design livelihood options that allow both vulnerable host communities and refugees to find ways to better support themselves; we need to see greater involvement of development actors and funding for infrastructural improvements in host countries and support for education and health sectors.</p> <p><strong>A lifeline through resettlement</strong> will be essential for the most vulnerable refugees – Oxfam has called for the most vulnerable 5% registered in neighbouring countries to be resettled by the end of 2015 - but governments should also look at extending temporary work visa and education programmes to people fleeing Syria as well. The world is currently failing to curb the conflict in Syria; it must not abandon those whose lives have already been ripped apart as well.  </p> <p><em>This entry posted by Camilla Jelbart Mosse, Syria campaign manager, Oxfam, on 30 March 2015.</em></p> <p><em>Photos:</em></p> <p><em>Top: Emad and his family of 7 fled their comfortable Damascus home and fled to Jordan in September 2102. Credit: Khalid Said/Oxfam</em></p> <p><em>Middle: Abu Ali and Um Ali fled Syria in 2012, now live with their children in a make-shift settlement in Lebanon’s Bekaa Valley. Credit: Yasmine Chawaf/Oxfam</em></p> <p><em>Bottom: Samia*, 60, from Aleppo, fled the war in Syria with her husband. This was her second winter in Lebanon’s Bekaa valley. Credit: Yasmine Chawaf/Oxfam</em></p> <p><em>*Names have been changed.</em></p> <h3>What you can do now</h3> <p><strong>Support <a href="http://www.oxfam.org/en/emergencies/syria-crisis" rel="nofollow">Oxfam's humanitarian response to the Syria crisis</a></strong></p> <p><a href="https://www.withsyria.com/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow"><strong>Call on World Leaders to stop the suffering in Syria</strong></a></p> <p><strong>Download <a href="https://www.oxfam.org/en/research/syria-crisis-fair-share-analysis-2015" rel="nofollow">Oxfam's Syria Crisis Fair Share Analysis 2015</a></strong></p> <h3>You may also like</h3> <p><a href="https://blogs.oxfam.org/en/blogs/15-03-25-syria-stain-conscience-world"><strong>Syria: a stain on the conscience of the world</strong></a></p></div><div class="field field-name-title"><h2>Syria: wealthy governments meeting in Kuwait hold the key to survival for millions</h2></div> Mon, 30 Mar 2015 09:40:13 +0000 Camilla Jelbart Mosse 26047 at http://l.blogs.oxfam http://l.blogs.oxfam/fr/node/26047#comments Winter storm and increased border restrictions bring new challenges to conflict-weary Syrian refugees http://l.blogs.oxfam/fr/node/24739 <div class="field field-name-body"><h3>Oxfam and our partners work to reach refugee families hit hard by torrents of rain and snow.</h3> <p>As the icy driving rain leaked into their flimsy tent and the blustering wind rocked their makeshift home in Chekka northern Lebanon, wide-eyed Raneem, 6, huddled against her mother, unable to sleep. A major storm is sweeping through the region bringing new misery to thousands of Syrian refugees like Raneem.</p> <p>According to <a href="http://english.alarabiya.net/en/News/middle-east/2015/01/07/Snowstorm-Huda-and-flooding-hit-the-Middle-East-.html" rel="nofollow"><strong>media reports</strong></a>, the storm has already claimed the lives of 4 refugees. For young Raneem and others, they have little protection from the cold. Ayman a refugee from Syria told Oxfam, "Our children are all sick. The cold is unbearable, and we have no means to keep them warm."</p> <p>In Lebanon, coastal areas have been battered by waves and howling winds. Deep snow has blanketed settlements in which refugees live, blocking roads and isolating towns leaving people without access to urgent medical care. Under the weight of the heavy snowfall, tents have caved in, and water tanks have frozen.</p> <p>In Jordan, extreme weather conditions have also hit <a href="https://www.flickr.com/search/?w=8470194@N02&amp;q=zaatari" rel="nofollow"><strong>Zaatari refugee camp</strong></a>, the country’s largest with more than 80,000 inhabitants. Children, wearing plastic summer shoes, try to jump between icy puddles, as men shovel snow from above tents and caravans. "We are in desperate need of caravans, we cannot live in tents anymore," said Abu Ayman.</p> <p><img alt="Six-year-old Raneem huddles near a stove in her family&#039;s shelter in northern Lebanon. Credit: Oriol Andres/Oxfam" title="Six-year-old Raneem huddles near a stove in her family&#039;s shelter in northern Lebanon. Credit: Oriol Andres/Oxfam" height="813" width="1220" class="media-element file-default" typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://l.blogs.oxfam/sites/default/files/raneem-oxfam_oriol_012_web_1220nc.jpg" /></p> <p><a href="http://www.oxfam.org/en/crisis-syria-lebanon/syrian-refugees-lebanon-another-winter-away-home" rel="nofollow"><strong>Weeks ago, Oxfam had started preparing for the winter season</strong></a> by distributing plastic sheets and cash vouchers in Lebanon, and digging trenches around tents in Zaatari to avoid them being flooded by the rain. Evacuation plans had been put in place too, in close coordination with other agencies. But as the storm endures, refugees are in desperate need of food, water and shelter.</p> <p>“Refugees who don’t have proper access to clean water or can’t store drinking water will be in severe difficulties if we don’t reach them in the next two days,” Laurian Gauny, Oxfam’s program manager in the valley, told Reuters on Wednesday.</p> <p>In both Lebanon and Jordan, <strong>Oxfam is ramping up our aid response</strong> to keep Syrian refugees warm through the cold weather. We are working with partners in Lebanon to ensure families can rebuild damaged tents with plastic sheets, and distributing hygiene kits that include soap, diapers and sanitary pads to ensure people can meet their basic needs. While in Jordan, our teams will be addressing the most pressing water and sanitation needs.</p> <p>The danger, however, will not lift when the snow stops falling. Informal settlements are likely to be severely flooded and in the Zataari refugee camp in Jordan we’re concerned that storm water may cause septic tanks to overflow, which could lead to big health risks.</p> <p>In Jordan, an Oxfam team is working to ensure that the trucking of water continues so people will have a safe supply for drinking.</p> <p>Oxfam and our partners will be working hard to reach people with support.</p> <p>For Raneem and others facing their fourth winter in exile, this help goes a long way. But with no end in sight of the bloody conflict, and governments increasingly closing their borders to vulnerable Syrian refugees, Raneem has no choice but to huddle against her mother and pray the storm ends.</p> <h3>The challenge of seeking safety</h3> <p><img alt="Sandals offer little protection to the feet of children in a refugee settlement in northern Lebanon. Credit: Oriol Andres/Oxfam" title="Sandals offer little protection to the feet of children in a refugee settlement in northern Lebanon. Credit: Oriol Andres/Oxfam" height="813" width="1220" class="media-element file-default" typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://l.blogs.oxfam/sites/default/files/sandals-oxfam_oriol_006_web_1220nc.jpg" /></p> <p>The <a href="http://www.oxfam.org/en/emergencies/syria-crisis" rel="nofollow"><strong>conflict in Syria</strong></a> has dragged on for nearly four years, forcing about 3.3 million Syrians, more than half of whom are under the age of 18, to flee their country and seek safety in neighboring nations.</p> <p>But now, that safety has become more difficult to find as neighboring countries, struggling under the strain of the crisis, increasingly restrict their borders. In the end of December, Lebanon—where one in every four people is a Syrian refugee—announced  it was imposing new entry regulations for Syrians, requiring them to apply for one of six types of visas in order to come into the country. Extreme humanitarian cases will also be considered, though the criteria for those is unclear.</p> <p><a href="http://www.oxfam.org/en/pressroom/reactions/oxfams-reaction-new-restrictions-entry-syrians-lebanon" rel="nofollow"><strong>The new restrictions on entry for Syrians into Lebanon</strong></a> are part of a worrying, wider trend reflecting quite simply fewer and fewer opportunities for Syrians to escape conflict. Neighboring countries, particularly Lebanon and Jordan, have welcomed huge numbers of Syrians fleeing conflict to date in an unprecedented crisis. These countries have a clear obligation to ensure that refugees can continue to seek safety, but they are facing enormous strain. The increased restrictions should also be seen as a collective failure of the international community as a whole, as neighboring countries continue to receive insufficient support from other governments.</p> <p><a href="http://blogs.oxfam.org/en/blogs/14-12-17-international-community-must-step-its-support-lebanon"><strong>The international community must step up its support for Lebanon.</strong></a></p> <p><em>Oxfam has helped more than 1.5 million people across Syria, Lebanon, and Jordan with lifesaving essentials. But the needs of families remain enormous.</em></p> <p><em>Photos:</em></p> <p><em>1. Strong winds blew the roof off the shelter that housed Yehia, a farmer from Syria, and his family. Credit: Oriol Andres/Oxfam</em></p> <p><em>2. Six-year-old Raneem huddles near a stove in her family's shelter in northern Lebanon. Credit: Oriol Andres/Oxfam</em></p> <p><em>3. Sandals offer little protection to the feet of children in a refugee settlement in northern Lebanon. Credit: Oriol Andres/Oxfam</em></p> <p><em>This update is from Joelle Bassoul <a href="http://twitter.com/jobassoul" rel="nofollow"><strong>@jobassoul</strong></a>, Oxfam Media Advisor, Syria Response, dated 9 January 2015. For updates, please follow <a href="http://twitter.com/Oxfam" rel="nofollow"><strong>@Oxfam</strong></a>.</em></p> <h3>What you can do now</h3> <p><a href="http://www.oxfam.org/en/emergencies/syria-crisis" rel="nofollow"><strong>Donate now</strong></a></p> <p> </p></div><div class="field field-name-title"><h2>Winter storm and increased border restrictions bring new challenges to conflict-weary Syrian refugees</h2></div><ul class="links inline"><li class="translation_fr first"><a href="http://l.blogs.oxfam/fr/blogs/15-01-14-des-milliers-de-r%C3%A9fugi%C3%A9s-syriens-aux-prises-avec-les-intemp%C3%A9ries" title="Des milliers de réfugiés syriens aux prises avec les intempéries" class="translation-link" xml:lang="fr">Français</a></li> <li class="translation_es last"><a href="http://l.blogs.oxfam/es/blogs/15-01-13-la-batalla-diaria-de-los-refugiados-sirios-contra-el-fr%C3%ADo" title="La batalla diaria de los refugiados sirios contra el frío" class="translation-link" xml:lang="es">Español</a></li> </ul> Fri, 09 Jan 2015 19:00:12 +0000 Camilla Jelbart Mosse 24739 at http://l.blogs.oxfam http://l.blogs.oxfam/fr/node/24739#comments El día en que nació nuestro querido bebé http://l.blogs.oxfam/fr/node/10421 <div class="field field-name-body"><p><strong>Mientras el Alto Comisionado de las Naciones Unidas para los Refugiados <a href="http://www.acnur.org/t3/noticias/noticia/dos-millones-de-sirios-convertidos-en-refugiados/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">anunciaba el martes</a> que el número de refugiados sirios registrados que ha huido de Siria ha alcanzado los dos millones, te traemos noticias más felices de nuestra querida amiga Liqaa’. </strong></p> <p>Si has seguido nuestra <a href="http://www.change.org/es/peticiones/no-fall%C3%A9is-a-siria" target="_blank" rel="nofollow"><strong>campaña a favor de una solución política para la crisis en Siria</strong></a>, sabrás que Liqaa’ se prestó a ser el rostro de nuestra campaña cuando a principios de este año llegó al campo de Za'atari en avanzado estado de gestación.</p> <p>El mes pasado <strong>dio a luz a una niña sana llamada Limar.</strong></p> <h3>Un momento mágico</h3> <p>Cuando fuimos a visitarla, Liqaa' nos contó cómo fue la llegada de Limar:</p> <p>"Fue un día precioso para mi marido, Basel, y para mí. Por fin conocimos a nuestro querido bebé. Me sentí muy feliz. Tras el nacimiento me encontraba muy cansada pero después de verla se me pasó todo el cansancio". </p> <p>Sin embargo,  el día que iba a ser uno de los más felices de su vida se llenó de tristeza al no poder compartir este momento mágico con el resto de su familia, en Siria. </p> <p>“Ese día eché mucho de menos a mi familia. Lloré y aún en este momento les echo de menos. Pienso en volver pero no es seguro. Quería dar a luz en Siria y estar junto a mi familia pero era demasiado peligroso".</p> <h3>Criar a un niño en un campo de refugiados</h3> <p>Aunque Liqaa' se ha acostumbrado a su nueva forma de vida en el campo de refugiados de Za'atari, tras dar a luz se ha dado cuenta de lo difícil que es criar a un niño en un campo de refugiados.</p> <p><strong>"Resulta muy difícil criar a un bebé aquí</strong>. Durante el día hace demasiado calor para ella y, por la noche, demasiado frío. Es difícil conseguir medicinas y atención sanitaria en los hospitales. Los adultos pueden arreglárselas con los servicios disponibles pero para los niños y niñas es mucho más difícil".</p> <p>La historia de Liqaa' y Basel no es única. Y teniendo en cuenta los lentos progresos hacia una solución política al conflicto, no serán los últimos en ser padres en estas circunstancias. Limar es sólo una de los dos millones de personas refugiadas a las que la comunidad internacional ha defraudado y quienes pagan el precio del conflicto.</p> <h3>Ayúdanos a "voler a nuestro futuro"</h3> <p>Como portavoz de nuestra campaña a favor de una solución política para la crisis en Siria, Liqaa' nos ha contado qué ha significado para ella convertirse en madre y cuál cree que es la mejor solución para Siria ahora:</p> <p>"<a href="http://blogs.oxfam.org/es/blogs/13-07-24-liqaa-es-una-amiga"><strong>Hace un tiempo, dije</strong></a> <strong>que necesitábamos la paz en Siria para nuestros hijos e hijas</strong>. Ahora que Limar ha nacido, para mí es aún más importante recuperar nuestro país, que ella pueda crecer allí, con nuestra familia. Lo que me gustaría es que la comunidad internacional ayudara a la población siria a encontrar una solución política y a poder volver a nuestro país y a nuestras vidas.... a nuestro futuro".</p> <p></p> <p>Ayuda firmando la <a href="http://www.change.org/es/peticiones/no-fall%C3%A9is-a-siria" target="_blank" rel="nofollow"><strong>petición para que empiecen las conversaciones de paz hoy. </strong></a></p> <p><em>Puedes hacer un<a href="http://www.oxfam.org/es/emergencia-siria" rel="nofollow"><strong> donativo</strong></a> para la respuesta humanitaria de Oxfam para la crisis de Siria.</em></p> <h3>Más información</h3> <p><strong><a href="http://blogs.oxfam.org/es/blogs/13-07-24-liqaa-es-una-amiga">Liqaa' es una amiga</a></strong></p> <p><strong><a href="http://blogs.oxfam.org/es/blogs/13-07-18-por-que-las-negociaciones-de-paz-son-unica-solucion-para-siria">Por qué las negociaciones de paz son la única solución para Siria</a></strong></p> <p><strong><a href="http://www.oxfam.org/es/emergencies/crisis-en-siria" rel="nofollow">Crisis en Siria</a></strong></p></div><div class="field field-name-title"><h2>El día en que nació nuestro querido bebé</h2></div><ul class="links inline"><li class="translation_en first"><a href="http://l.blogs.oxfam/en/blogs/13-09-05-two-million-refugees-sweet-baby-born" title="Two million Syrian refugees – and another sweet new baby is born" class="translation-link" xml:lang="en">English</a></li> <li class="translation_fr last"><a href="http://l.blogs.oxfam/fr/blogs/13-09-05-le-jour-ou-notre-adorable-enfant-est-nee" title="Deux millions de réfugiés syriens - et une enfant de plus, née dans un camp " class="translation-link" xml:lang="fr">Français</a></li> </ul> Thu, 05 Sep 2013 14:43:29 +0000 Rachel Edwards 10421 at http://l.blogs.oxfam http://l.blogs.oxfam/fr/node/10421#comments Two million Syrian refugees – and another sweet new baby is born http://l.blogs.oxfam/fr/node/10422 <div class="field field-name-body"><p><strong>As the United Nations High Commission on Refugees <a href="http://www.unhcr.org/522495669.html" rel="nofollow">announced on Tuesday</a> that the number of registered refugees fleeing Syria has reached 2 million, we bring you some happier news about our friend Liqaa.</strong></p> <p>If you’ve been following our <strong><a href="http://www.change.org/petitions/don-t-let-syria-down" rel="nofollow">campaign for a political solution to the crisis in Syria</a></strong>, you’ll know that Liqaa agreed to be the face of our campaign when she moved to Za’atari refugee camp, heavily pregnant, earlier this year.</p> <p>Last month, she gave birth to a healthy little girl named Limar.</p> <h3>A magical moment</h3> <p>When we went to see her, Liqaa’ told us about Limar’s arrival: "It was such a beautiful day for me and for my husband [Basel] to see this sweet baby. I was so happy. After giving birth I was tired but after seeing her I forgot about my tiredness.</p> <p>But on what was one of the happiest days of her life, she was overcome with the sadness of being unable to share this magical day with the rest of her family back in Syria.</p> <p>"I missed my family so much on that day. I was crying, and until now I miss them... and think of going back but it's not safe. I wanted to go to give birth in Syria and be next to my family but it was too dangerous”.</p> <h3>Raising a child in a refugee camp</h3> <p>Although Liqaa’ had become accustomed to the way of life in Za’atari refugee camp, after birth she realised how much she had under estimated the hardship of raising a child in a refugee camp.</p> <p><strong>"It's so difficult to raise a baby here.</strong> The climate is too hot for her during the day, and in the night it's so cold. Hospitals here are not that good to get medicines and medical services. Adults can get by with the services we have here but for children it's much harder."</p> <p>Liqaa’ and Basel’s story is not unique. With the snail’s pace of progress towards finding a political solution to the conflict, they won’t be the last to become new parents in such circumstances. Indeed, there are some <a href="http://jordantimes.com/around-10-babies-born-every-day-in-zaatari-refugee-camp" target="_blank" rel="nofollow"><strong>10 babies born each day</strong></a> in Za'atari camp. Limar now becomes just one of the two million refugees let down by the international community, and left to pay the price of this conflict.</p> <h3>Help us “go back to our future”</h3> <p>As a spokesperson for our campaign for a political solution to the crisis in Syria, Liqaa also told us what becoming a new mum meant for her and her thoughts about the best way forward for Syria now:</p> <p><strong>"I <a href="http://blogs.oxfam.org/en/blogs/13-07-23-liqaa-friend-mine-syria-refugees">said earlier</a> that we need peace in Syria for our children.</strong> Now that I've given birth to Limar it's even more important for me and for her to have our country back, for her to grow up there with our family. What I wish from the international community is to help the Syrian people to find a political solution, to help us to go back to our country, to our life, to our future”.</p> <p></p> <p>Help by standing with Liqaa’ and <a href="http://www.change.org/petitions/don-t-let-syria-down" target="_blank" rel="nofollow"><strong>support the petition for Syrian peace talks</strong></a> today.</p> <p><em>You can <a href="http://www.oxfam.org/en/syria-appeal" rel="nofollow"><strong>donate</strong></a> to Oxfam's humanitarian response to the Syria crisis.</em></p> <h3>You may also like</h3> <p><strong><a href="/en/blogs/13-07-23-liqaa-friend-mine-syria-refugees" rel="nofollow">Liqaa' is a friend of mine</a></strong></p> <p><strong><a href="http://blogs.oxfam.org/en/blogs/13-07-18-why-peace-talks-are-only-way-forward-syria">Why peace talks are the only way forward for Syria</a></strong></p></div><div class="field field-name-title"><h2>Two million Syrian refugees – and another sweet new baby is born</h2></div><ul class="links inline"><li class="translation_es first"><a href="http://l.blogs.oxfam/es/blogs/13-09-05-el-dia-en-que-nacio-nuestro-querido-bebe" title="El día en que nació nuestro querido bebé" class="translation-link" xml:lang="es">Español</a></li> <li class="translation_fr last"><a href="http://l.blogs.oxfam/fr/blogs/13-09-05-le-jour-ou-notre-adorable-enfant-est-nee" title="Deux millions de réfugiés syriens - et une enfant de plus, née dans un camp " class="translation-link" xml:lang="fr">Français</a></li> </ul> Thu, 05 Sep 2013 09:31:08 +0000 Rachel Edwards 10422 at http://l.blogs.oxfam http://l.blogs.oxfam/fr/node/10422#comments L’énergie solaire en aide aux réfugiés syriens http://l.blogs.oxfam/fr/blogs/13-08-13-energie-solaire-en-aide-aux-refugies-syriens <div class="field field-name-body"><p><strong>Pour les Syriennes et Syriens réfugiés au camp de Zaatari, en Jordanie, le soleil est source de sécurité nocturne.</strong></p> <p>Regardez attentivement cette photo, plus haut. Les réverbères ne vous semblent-ils pas inhabituels ? Les lampadaires que vous voyez en arrière-plan de cette photo (prise au début du mois dans le camp de réfugiés de Zaatari, en Jordanie) fonctionnent en fait à l’énergie solaire et ont été fournis par Oxfam afin de renforcer la sécurité des résidents.</p> <p>Les techniciens d’Oxfam ont installé ces lampadaires devant les blocs sanitaires (comprenant douches, toilettes et buanderie), afin de permettre aux familles et aux enfants de se sentir plus en sécurité lorsqu’ils utilisent ces équipements de première nécessité la nuit.</p> <p>« Des panneaux solaires permettent d’éclairer l’intérieur et l’extérieur des sanitaires, explique Karl Schembri d’Oxfam, qui a visité le camp en juillet et a pris les photos illustrant cet article. [Ils] sont entièrement alimentés par l’énergie solaire et ne doivent pas être raccordés au réseau.</p> <p>« Les techniciens [d’Oxfam] doivent toujours sortir du camp à une heure précise, mais j’ai récemment eu le privilège d’y passer la nuit. J’ai pu constater que ces lampadaires éclairent des rues entières, ce qui permet aux gens de se sentir en sécurité lorsqu’ils vont aux toilettes la nuit. Quand j’ai montré mes photos aux techniciens, c’était la première fois qu’ils pouvaient voir ce que cela donne de nuit. Ils étaient très heureux et très fiers du résultat. »</p> <p></p> <p>Ces lampadaires solaires ne représentent qu’une petite partie des <strong><a href="http://www.oxfam.org/fr/emergencies/crise-en-syrie" rel="nofollow">efforts menés par Oxfam pour venir en aide aux familles déplacées par le conflit syrien</a></strong>. Plus de 100 000 réfugiés, <strong><a href="http://firstperson.oxfamamerica.org/2013/04/26/photos-of-the-week-the-children-of-zaatari-camp/" rel="nofollow">dont beaucoup d’enfants</a></strong>, vivent désormais à Zaatari, le plus grand camp de réfugiés en Jordanie. Les techniciens d’Oxfam ont construit des latrines d’urgence pour 20 000 réfugiés, ainsi que des blocs sanitaires plus durables pour 8 000 personnes.</p> <p>Chaque jour, des hommes, des femmes et des enfants continuent cependant d’arriver à Zaatari, tandis que l’intervention d’Oxfam visant à apporter une aide humanitaire à 650 000 personnes en Jordanie, au Liban et en Syrie manque encore gravement de financements. Tout don permet à des familles d’accéder à de l’eau potable, des latrines, un abri et des articles de première nécessité.</p> <p>Pour nous aider à répondre aux besoins les plus fondamentaux dans cette situation d’urgence qui ne cesse de s’aggraver, vous aussi, <strong><a href="http://www.oxfam.org/fr/urgence-syrie" rel="nofollow">contribuez au Fonds pour la crise syrienne</a></strong>.</p> <p></p> <p><em>Vous pouvez aussi aider en signant <strong><a href="http://www.change.org/fr/p%C3%A9titions/obama-et-poutine-n-abandonnez-pas-la-syrie" rel="nofollow">cette pétition pour l’ouverture immédiate de pourparlers de paix sur la Syrie</a></strong>.</em></p> <p><em>Publié originalement par<strong><a href="http://firstperson.oxfamamerica.org/2013/07/31/how-solar-power-is-helping-refugees/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow"> Oxfam America</a></strong>.</em></p> <p><em>Photos : Karl Schembri/Oxfam</em></p> <h3>En savoir plus</h3> <p><strong>Vidéo : <a href="http://www.oxfam.org/fr/video/2013/liqaa-refugiee-syrienne-camp-zaatari" rel="nofollow">Liqaa', 23 ans, réfugiée syrienne</a></strong></p> <p><strong>Rapport : <a href="http://www.oxfam.org/fr/policy/syrie-depasses-besoins" rel="nofollow">Syrie : dépassés par les besoins</a></strong><a href="http://www.oxfam.org/fr/policy/syrie-depasses-besoins" rel="nofollow"></a> – L’échec de la communauté internationale à répondre à la crise humanitaire qui s’aggrave en Syrie<em></em></p> <p><strong><a href="http://www.oxfam.org/fr/emergencies/crise-en-syrie" rel="nofollow">La crise en Syrie</a></strong><em></em></p></div><div class="field field-name-title"><h2>L’énergie solaire en aide aux réfugiés syriens</h2></div><ul class="links inline"><li class="translation_en first"><a href="http://l.blogs.oxfam/en/blogs/13-08-08-how-solar-power-helping-syrian-refugees" title="How solar power is helping Syrian refugees" class="translation-link" xml:lang="en">English</a></li> <li class="translation_es last"><a href="http://l.blogs.oxfam/es/blogs/13-08-12-sacar-partido-al-sol-abrasador-en-zaatari" title="Sacar partido al sol abrasador en Zaatari" class="translation-link" xml:lang="es">Español</a></li> </ul> Tue, 13 Aug 2013 18:48:19 +0000 Anna Kramer 10398 at http://l.blogs.oxfam http://l.blogs.oxfam/fr/blogs/13-08-13-energie-solaire-en-aide-aux-refugies-syriens#comments How solar power is helping Syrian refugees http://l.blogs.oxfam/fr/node/10395 <div class="field field-name-body"><h3>For Syrian refugees in Jordan’s Zaatari camp, the sun’s light means safer nights.</h3> <p>Look closely at the photo above. Notice anything different about those lampposts? In fact, the lights in the background of the photo—which was taken in Jordan’s Zaatari refugee camp earlier this month—are actually solar-powered lamps installed by Oxfam to help improve residents’ safety.</p> <p>Oxfam engineers installed the lamps outside of sanitation facilities (which contain showers, toilets, and laundry facilities for camp residents), using this alternative source of energy to make it safer for families and kids to use these essential facilities at night.</p> <p>“We have solar panels lighting the toilet areas inside and out,” said Oxfam’s Karl Schembri, who visited the camp in July and took the photos above and below. “[They] are completely solar powered and don’t need to be connected to the grid.</p> <p>"The [Oxfam] engineers have to leave the camp each day at a certain hour, but I recently had the privilege to stay overnight. I could see these lights are lighting up entire streets, so people feel safe to go to the toilet at night. When I showed my pictures to the engineers, it was the first time they could see the effect at night. They were so happy and proud.”</p> <p></p> <p>The solar-powered lights are just one small part of <strong><a href="http://www.oxfam.org/en/emergencies/syria-crisis" rel="nofollow">Oxfam’s efforts to help families displaced by the conflict in Syria</a></strong>. More than 100,000 refugees—<strong><a href="http://firstperson.oxfamamerica.org/2013/04/26/photos-of-the-week-the-children-of-zaatari-camp/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">many of whom are kids</a></strong>—are now sheltering in Zaatari, Jordan’s largest refugee camp. Oxfam engineers have built emergency latrines for 20,000 camp residents, as well as more permanent blocks of sanitation facilities to benefit 8,000 people.</p> <p>Meanwhile, more people are arriving in Zaatari every day, and Oxfam’s efforts to provide 650,000 people with humanitarian aid in Jordan, Lebanon, and Syria are severely underfunded. Your donation will help families access safe water, latrines, shelter, and critical supplies. <strong><a href="http://www.oxfam.org/en/emergencies/syria-crisis" rel="nofollow"></a></strong></p> <p><strong><a href="http://www.oxfam.org/en/emergencies/syria-crisis" rel="nofollow">Please donate to the Syrian Crisis Fund</a></strong> to help us meet the most critical needs in this escalating emergency.</p> <p></p> <p></p> <p><em>You can also help by <a href="http://www.change.org/petitions/don-t-let-syria-down" target="_blank" rel="nofollow"><strong>supporting the petition for Syrian peace talks</strong></a> today.</em></p> <p><em></em></p> <p><em>Originally published on<strong><a href="http://firstperson.oxfamamerica.org/2013/07/31/how-solar-power-is-helping-refugees/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow"> Oxfam America</a></strong>.</em></p> <p><em>Photos: Karl Schembri/Oxfam</em></p> <h3>You may also like</h3> <p><strong>Watch the video: <a href="http://www.oxfam.org/en/video/2013/meet-liqaa-23-and-syrian-refugee" rel="nofollow">Meet Liqaa', 23 and a Syrian refugee</a></strong></p> <p><strong>Read the report: <a href="http://www.oxfam.org/en/policy/syria-overtaken-need" rel="nofollow">Syria: Overtaken By Need </a></strong>- The world’s failure to meet Syria’s escalating humanitarian crisis<em></em></p></div><div class="field field-name-title"><h2>How solar power is helping Syrian refugees</h2></div><ul class="links inline"><li class="translation_es first"><a href="http://l.blogs.oxfam/es/blogs/13-08-12-sacar-partido-al-sol-abrasador-en-zaatari" title="Sacar partido al sol abrasador en Zaatari" class="translation-link" xml:lang="es">Español</a></li> <li class="translation_fr last"><a href="http://l.blogs.oxfam/fr/blogs/13-08-13-energie-solaire-en-aide-aux-refugies-syriens" title="L’énergie solaire en aide aux réfugiés syriens" class="translation-link" xml:lang="fr">Français</a></li> </ul> Thu, 08 Aug 2013 15:20:24 +0000 Anna Kramer 10395 at http://l.blogs.oxfam http://l.blogs.oxfam/fr/node/10395#comments 100,000 deaths in Syria and counting - Time for peace http://l.blogs.oxfam/fr/node/10427 <div class="field field-name-body"><p>The number of reported deaths in Syria continues to rise relentlessly. This time last year the figure was hovering around 20,000. That was bad enough – but no one could have imagined that <strong><a href="http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/world/2013/07/25/100000-dead-in-syrias-civil-war/2587521/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">within 12 months the total would have topped 100,000</a></strong>, with more, inevitably, to come.</p> <p>I have worked in the humanitarian world for almost a decade now – from Haiti to <a href="http://www.oxfam.org/somalia" rel="nofollow"><strong>Somalia</strong></a>, the Asian tsunami of 2004 to the <a href="http://www.oxfam.org/en/emergencies/gaza" rel="nofollow"><strong>conflict in Gaza</strong></a> – yet the numbers behind the Syria crisis still never fail to shock me. Too many lives have been lost, too many futures shattered.</p> <p>The international community's failures to tackle the Syria crisis are having monumental ramifications on the lives of a generation across the Middle East. For the world to simply stand by while 100,000 people lose their lives -- and more than six million people lose their homes - is more than just negligence. It is unforgivable.</p> <p><strong>One hundred thousand lives lost</strong>. Proportional to population, this would be <strong>the equivalent of 1,570,000 Americans being killed.</strong></p> <h3>A wake up call</h3> <p>This statistic alone needs to be a wakeup call. Now is the time to put an end to this suffering. The long-overdue Geneva peace conference proposed by Moscow and Washington still offers a much-needed glimmer of hope on the horizon. However, the conference -- and its outcomes -- must not be allowed to become collateral damage in a wider diplomatic game.</p> <p>I recently returned from Lebanon and Jordan, where Oxfam is providing fresh water and sanitation facilities to thousands of Syrian refugees. I visited Zataari camp in Jordan, the single biggest refugee camp I have ever been to, with more than 100,000 people living there. In Lebanon, I visited Syrian families living on the outskirts of a cemetery.</p> <p>Day-to-day life in a camp in the middle of a desert is grim. Inside the tents or steel shipping containers (called caravans) which offer families shelter from the sun, temperatures can reach 122 degrees Fahrenheit (50 degrees Celsius) during the day. It is simply unbearable.</p> <h3>A grim reality</h3> <p>This has what has become reality for families living in Zaatari. And it could be their reality for a long, long time to come. With no end in sight to the crisis and funding in such short supply for the humanitarian response in countries hosting Syrian refugees such as Lebanon, Iraq, Turkey and Jordan, it's hard to see how life is going to improve for these families in the near future.</p> <p>At last month's G8 meeting in Northern Ireland, leaders demonstrated that in spite of significant political differences among them, there is still a fundamental recognition that the conflict and bloodshed in Syria must end.</p> <p>This was underpinned by a <strong><a href="http://www.aljazeera.com/news/europe/2013/06/2013618151322522933.html" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">clear commitment by the international community </a></strong>to hold a peace conference in Geneva as a first step towards finding a lasting peaceful and political solution to the crisis. But as the summer unfolds, the process has ground to a halt. Fears are now mounting that the momentum for political solutions will be lost if urgent action is not taken.</p> <h3>How we can help</h3> <p>The international community must end its dithering. Discussions around Geneva have so far lacked the urgency that this crisis demands. US Secretary of State John Kerry <strong><a href="http://articles.washingtonpost.com/2013-07-02/world/40315210_1_kerry-and-lavrov-russia-peace-meeting" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">recently suggested </a></strong>that it will be at least September until such a peace conference can take place. Russia and the US need to overcome their differences, stop the talks about talks, and get down to the business of finding political solutions and making peace a reality.</p> <p>The people I spoke with in the region say they can't bear to wait much longer for a peaceful end to the conflict. As the sand blows into their eyes and their skin cracks and burns in the hot summer sun, they say they feel the world has forgotten them.</p> <p>While they want to go back home in safety, at the moment, that is but a distant dream. <strong>We can't wait any longer. Let's make it a reality.</strong></p> <p></p> <p><em>Help by <a href="http://www.change.org/petitions/don-t-let-syria-down" target="_blank" rel="nofollow"><strong>supporting the petition for Syrian peace talks</strong></a> today.</em></p> <p><em>You can <a href="http://www.oxfam.org/en/syria-appeal" rel="nofollow"><strong>donate</strong></a> to Oxfam's humanitarian response to the Syria crisis.</em></p> <p><em>Originally posted on the <a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/louis-belanger/100000-deaths-in-syria-an_b_3672764.html" target="_blank" rel="nofollow"><strong>Huffington Post</strong></a>.</em></p> <h3>You may also like</h3> <p><strong>Watch the video: <a href="http://www.oxfam.org/en/video/2013/meet-liqaa-23-and-syrian-refugee" rel="nofollow">Meet Liqaa', 23 and a Syrian refugee</a></strong><a href="http://www.oxfam.org/en/video/2013/meet-liqaa-23-and-syrian-refugee" rel="nofollow"></a></p> <p><strong>Read the report: <a href="http://www.oxfam.org/en/policy/syria-overtaken-need" rel="nofollow">Syria: Overtaken By Need </a></strong>- The world’s failure to meet Syria’s escalating humanitarian crisis<em></em></p></div><div class="field field-name-title"><h2>100,000 deaths in Syria and counting - Time for peace</h2></div> Mon, 05 Aug 2013 10:45:38 +0000 Louis Belanger 10427 at http://l.blogs.oxfam http://l.blogs.oxfam/fr/node/10427#comments Liqaa’ is a friend of mine http://l.blogs.oxfam/fr/node/10390 <div class="field field-name-body"><p><em>Meet Liqaa. She’s a 23 year old English literature graduate from Syria. She’s recently married, and expecting her first child soon. She’s also the face of a new global petition calling on Russian President Vladimir Putin and US President Barack Obama to <a href="http://www.change.org/petitions/don-t-let-syria-down" target="_blank" rel="nofollow"><strong>make urgent progress on the Syria peace talks</strong></a> they promised.</em></p> <p><em>Liqaa’ agreed to be the face of our campaign because, in her own words, “We’ve shed enough tears and blood already. What we need is peace now. What we need is an end to the suffering.” She is one of millions of ordinary Syrians who believe that the only way to end the crisis in Syria is through a political solution that will bring peace to their country.</em></p> <p><em>Oxfam staff member Caroline Gluck has been working in Jordan, and got to know Liqaa’ well over the last few months. Here, she tells us more about this remarkable young woman:</em></p> <p><strong>Liqaa’ is a friend.</strong> Someone I’ve gossiped with about movies, music, food, and families. Earlier this year, she graduated from her university, where she studied English.    </p> <p>Liqaa’ is a friend. She’s also a refugee. And now she, like millions of others, faces an uncertain future. Even more so, since she is also pregnant and worried about what the coming months will bring.</p> <p>I met her husband, Bassel, back in January, when Jordan and Lebanon were experiencing the worst winter weather in more than twenty years. The family lived in a new section of Za’atari refugee camp, where Oxfam had been <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/oxfam/8556831487/in/set-72157632802510283" target="_blank" rel="nofollow"><strong>installing water facilities</strong></a> and <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/oxfam/8557939844/in/set-72157632802510283" target="_blank" rel="nofollow"><strong>building shower blocks, toilets and wash areas</strong></a>.</p> <p>Bassel, with his winning smile and deep-sunken dark brown eyes, proudly told me his wife spoke good English and would be coming to the camp soon. He went on to explain that he and his wife had arrived at the camp a few weeks earlier, but she had returned to Syria because she wanted to graduate from her university course in Damascus. “My studies were so important to me,” she later told me. “It can help me improve my life in the future.”</p> <p>It was a highly risky decision heading back into Syria, where conflict was raging, for the sake of a piece of paper. But Liqaa’ is a forceful woman and when she’s made up her mind, she won’t be swayed.</p> <p> </p> <p>When I first met Liqaa’, her eyes shone as she talked about her life back home, her time at university, her family and how she and Bassel had met. The couple married after the war began. Bassel, she told me, was the one pushing for the wedding ceremony. “He was so insistent to be married; we had been engaged for three years and he could not be patient any longer,” she said smiling. “He loved me so, so much. It was not a good time, but it was Allah’s will,” she said.</p> <p>Bassel looked on, bashfully, not understanding his wife’s English, but understanding well enough to know that she was talking about him with love.</p> <p>Liqaa’ told me how they have had their ups and downs over the weeks in Za’atari. Days when the weather was dire, when she felt sick and depressed, when her husband found it hard to get work and they talked about leaving the camp. But there were other, more upbeat days too, when there had been good news about Liqaa’s family in Syria, or when Bassel managed to find some work in the camp.</p> <p>She is now eight months pregnant and feels overwhelmed by the thought of giving birth in the camp, with her family all in Syria. Bringing new life into the world at such a time of uncertainty will be hard, but it’s also a reminder that life carries on, and that where there is new life, there is also new hope.</p> <p>For many of the 1.8 million refugees who have been forced to flee their homes in Syria, new hope comes in the shape of <a href="http://www.change.org/petitions/don-t-let-syria-down" target="_blank" rel="nofollow"><strong>peace talks</strong></a>, which could represent the beginning of the end for the war in Syria.</p> <p></p> <p>Help by standing with Liqaa’ and <a href="http://www.change.org/petitions/don-t-let-syria-down" target="_blank" rel="nofollow"><strong>support the petition for Syrian peace talks</strong></a> today.</p> <p><em>You can <a href="http://www.oxfam.org/en/syria-appeal" rel="nofollow"><strong>donate</strong></a> to Oxfam's humanitarian response to the Syria crisis.</em></p></div><div class="field field-name-title"><h2>Liqaa’ is a friend of mine</h2></div><ul class="links inline"><li class="translation_es first"><a href="http://l.blogs.oxfam/es/blogs/13-07-24-liqaa-es-una-amiga" title=" Liqaa’ es una amiga" class="translation-link" xml:lang="es">Español</a></li> <li class="translation_fr last"><a href="http://l.blogs.oxfam/fr/blogs/13-07-25-liqaa-amie-syrie-refugiee-jordanie" title="Liqaa’, une amie" class="translation-link" xml:lang="fr">Français</a></li> </ul> Tue, 23 Jul 2013 17:25:04 +0000 Caroline Gluck 10390 at http://l.blogs.oxfam http://l.blogs.oxfam/fr/node/10390#comments