Oxfam International Blogs - humanitarian aid http://l.blogs.oxfam/fr/tags/humanitarian-aid fr How to Build Community Trust to Fight Ebola in the Democratic Republic of Congo http://l.blogs.oxfam/fr/node/81952 <div class="field field-name-body"><p><em><strong>The world’s second-biggest Ebola outbreak is still raging in DRC, with more than 1,200 cases and 800 deaths. Research has shown that distrust is one of the biggest obstacles in this Ebola fight. Oxfam's Andrea Vera outlines three ways to work with local communities to build their trust and increase the success of an Ebola response in a conflict context.</strong></em></p><p>On April 19, 2019, an epidemiologist deployed by the World Health Organization in the Ebola outbreak response was <a href="https://www.npr.org/sections/goatsandsoda/2019/04/23/716121928/the-doctor-killed-in-fridays-ebola-attack-was-dedicated-but-also-afraid?t=1556284340775" rel="nofollow">killed in an armed attack</a> and his colleagues injured. Just a few days earlier, other attacks had taken place in Beni territory on an <a href="https://www.aljazeera.com/news/2019/03/drc-ebola-treatment-centre-attacked-killed-190309135835087.html" rel="nofollow">Ebola treatment center in Butembo</a> where armed men were engaged in a gunfight with security forces for about half an hour before the situation was contained.</p><p>Terrified patients fled the hospital, despite suffering the painful symptoms of Ebola. It took weeks for response teams to find them. The message of those who fled was clear: their fear of dying from an attack was greater than their hope of being cured in the Ebola treatment center.</p><p>In a country where communities build their own health clinics, it is a rare thing to see these precious resources destroyed. However, this is now happening all too often in Butembo city; leaving people afraid to go to Ebola treatment centers and their local health clinics.</p><p><strong>The consequences are severe</strong></p><p>Most patients now only arrive at treatment centers once they are already very weak and showing several symptoms of Ebola. At this phase of the disease, treatment is far less effective, and chances of survival are <a href="https://www.nationalgeographic.com/science/2019/04/worlds-second-biggest-ebola-outbreak-still-raging-heres-why-hot-zone/" rel="nofollow">drastically reduced</a>.</p><p>Some doctors and nurses have now closed their private clinics because the work has become too dangerous. They do not want to run the risk of being associated with Ebola teams because it could damage their reputation, as many people think the response is a money-making business and <a href="https://www.nbcnews.com/news/world/congo-s-ebola-response-threatened-conspiracy-theories-rumors-n994156" rel="nofollow">do not trust</a> that those who work with the response really want to help.</p><p>Likewise, people are increasingly reluctant to get vaccinated or receive other help to protect them from Ebola, such as decontaminating houses, safe burials and <a href="http://news.trust.org/item/20190424203556-g95c7" rel="nofollow">food distribution</a>.</p><p><img alt="Bora, who works as a public heath promotor assistant for Oxfam, installs a chlorinated hand washing point outside a church in Mangina, DRC. Photo: John Wessels/Oxfam" title="Bora, who works as a public heath promotor assistant for Oxfam, installs a chlorinated hand washing point outside a church in Mangina, DRC. Photo: John Wessels/Oxfam" height="826" width="1240" class="media-element file-default" data-delta="3" typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://l.blogs.oxfam/sites/default/files/113738lpr-oxfam-washstand-1240.jpg" /></p><p><em>Bora, who works as a public heath promotor assistant for Oxfam, installs a chlorinated hand washing point outside a church in Mangina, DRC. Photo: John Wessels/Oxfam</em></p><p><strong>Oxfam’s work on Ebola in DRC</strong></p><p>Oxfam has worked on this latest Ebola epidemic, the tenth in DRC, since August 2018. We have focused on public health promotion and supporting communities to design and carry-out their own action plans to break the chain of transmission.</p><p>We are also providing safe, clean water in affected communities, constructing latrines and waste disposal incinerators at health centers. In addition, Oxfam is leading on advocacy and communication efforts to make the response more inclusive and community-focused.</p><p>From our DRC experience, and from working in Ebola outbreaks in West Africa, we have learned some valuable lessons on how to fight the disease more effectively:</p><p><strong>1. Draw on local health capacity</strong></p><p>“In Butembo we have doctors… we want them to be the ones who treat us.”</p><p>Since the beginning of the outbreak, people have constantly asked health and aid workers to respect their culture and tradition, provide consistent information, deliver services on time, follow and respect vaccination lists, and to be treated by their own local doctors.</p><p>But, these requests have been often ignored, which has broken essential trust. Rather than support local health clinics and work with local health workers in a response, agencies have often created a parallel system to treat Ebola. This has only further frustrated people, and increased their reluctance to accept services that could treat many patients in their own communities.</p><p><strong>2. The response must be adapted to the local context</strong></p><p>The Ebola outbreak in the Democratic Republic of Congo is different, because it is happening in a conflict zone with a long history of violence where state security forces do not have full control. Many people in Beni, Mangina and Butembo blame the state for the lack of security.</p><p>This context of conflict has not been effectively included in designing the response, and feedback from the community has been ignored. The result has been to repeat previous mistakes.</p><p>Recently the Ministry of Health and international organizations, like Oxfam, have set up a response-wide mechanism to track and deal with people’s concerns. If the system is fully implemented it has the potential to correct the ways of working according to people’s recommendations.</p><p><strong>3. Ownership by the community is essential</strong></p><p><em>“Why are you talking about community engagement, and bringing people from other countries who do not speak our language?” </em></p><p>The vaccination and decontamination teams that go out into villages cannot effectively engage with the local communities because they often do not speak the local language. They don’t have the same capacities as local people to explain the risks of not getting vaccinated or not decontaminating their homes, or the need to get treatment early.</p><p>Community engagement means treating communities as equal partners, and recognising their capacity and experience to stop Ebola. It means respecting and involving local leaders and training local people to decontaminate, carry out safe burials and manage effective community-based surveillance to isolate cases, and refer people to clinics as early as possible.</p><p><img alt="A medical practitioner administers the Ebola vaccine to an Oxfam worker in Mangina, DRC. Photo: John Wessels/Oxfam" title="A medical practitioner administers the Ebola vaccine to an Oxfam worker in Mangina, DRC. Photo: John Wessels/Oxfam" height="826" width="1240" class="media-element file-default" data-delta="2" typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://l.blogs.oxfam/sites/default/files/113723lpr-oxfam-staff-vaccination-1240.jpg" /></p><p><em>A medical practitioner administers the Ebola vaccine to an Oxfam worker in Mangina, DRC. Photo: John Wessels/Oxfam</em></p><p><strong>Moving forward</strong></p><p>In recent weeks, we have observed positive movements with decontamination activities organized in collaboration with community groups, an initiative that we find very encouraging. Involving communities in developing action plans to solve challenges is as critical as medical expertise when it comes to effective prevention of Ebola.</p><p>Oxfam is working side-by-side with highly qualified health workers and technical experts from different organizations and the Ministry of Health who are working in harsh conditions and unsafe environments. Their daily efforts and invaluable support needs to be complemented with more community owned actions to end the current outbreak.</p><p><em>This entry posted on 2 May 2019, by Andrea Vera Nava, Oxfam Humanitarian Campaigns and Advocacy Manager. Andrea has worked in several countries in Latin America, Middle East and Africa. She has been working on the Ebola crisis in North Kivu and Ituri since October 2018, moving between the main epidemic hotspots.</em></p><p><em>Top photo: Medical workers administer the Ebola vaccine in Mangina, DRC. Oxfam was one of the first organizations to respond to the Ebola outbreak in North-Kivu and Ituri provinces. Photo: John Wessels/Oxfam</em></p><p><strong>Read more:</strong></p><ul><li><a href="https://blogs.oxfam.org/en/blogs/18-06-11-oxfam-10-lessons-working-communities-fight-ebola"><strong>Oxfam's 10 lessons for working with communities to fight Ebola</strong></a></li><li><strong>Download <a href="https://oxfamilibrary.openrepository.com/bitstream/handle/10546/620139/gd-community-engagement-wash-031116-en.pdf" rel="nofollow">Oxfam’s Guide to Community Engagement in WASH, based on lessons from Ebola</a></strong></li></ul><p></p></div><div class="field field-name-title"><h2>How to Build Community Trust to Fight Ebola in the Democratic Republic of Congo</h2></div> Thu, 02 May 2019 14:23:33 +0000 Guest Blogger 81952 at http://l.blogs.oxfam http://l.blogs.oxfam/fr/node/81952#comments Oxfam community activists help prevent cholera after Cyclone Idai in Mozambique http://l.blogs.oxfam/fr/node/81927 <div class="field field-name-body"><p>In the aftermath of the Idai Cyclone In Mozambique, Oxfam and the Ministry of Health have trained more than 60 community ‘activistas’ in Mozambique to promote public health advice to help stop the spread of cholera.</p> <p><strong>Cholera is easy to treat and prevent</strong></p> <p>“The tragedy is that cholera is actually easy to treat and simple to prevent.” Dorothy Sang, Oxfam’s Humanitarian Advocacy Manager in the devastated city of Beira, said. “But, if it really [takes] hold, it will flare [up and get] out of hand and the response will be that much more costly – both in terms of lives and the resources needed to stop it. We must get clean water and decent sanitation to people and [urgently promote the fact] that simple things like soap can keep cholera at bay.”</p> <p>“We need to bring in far more supplies and fast, particularly to ensure clean water and safe waste management… the people [need to be prioritised and we need] to step up public health promotion in the heart of the affected communities.”</p> <p>She went on to say that while the international response had been good, “the overall appeal remains just 17 percent funded – incredibly low for what the UN has described as ‘one of the worst weather-related disasters in Africa.”</p> <p><img alt=" Micas Mondlane/Oxfam" title=" Micas Mondlane/Oxfam" height="826" width="1240" data-delta="4" typeof="Image" src="http://l.blogs.oxfam/sites/default/files/18104lpr-boy-wading-1240.jpg" /></p> <p><em>Jose Arnando wades through the highly contaminated waters inside Tica village. His house can only be reached through the water. Photo: Micas Mondlane/Oxfam</em></p> <p><strong>The Mozambique government is working fast to set up cholera treatement centers</strong></p> <p>Cholera treatment centers are being set up in the city of Beira, Mozambique, where the threat of a cholera epidemic is high.</p> <p>Six people have died from the acute diarrheal disease and the number of cases is soaring, now over 3,000. The government began <a href="https://www.who.int/news-room/feature-stories/detail/combating-cholera-in-mozambique" rel="nofollow">oral vaccinations for 900,000 people</a> on April 3rd.</p> <p>These vaccinations need the support of a massive community outreach campaign to help people learn how they can protect themselves against cholera.</p> <p>With the help of Oxfam supporters like you, 64 ‘activistas’ so far have been trained to reach local communities with vital health information, including what to do if they suspect family or friends are infected. We will also distribute water purification liquids.</p> <p><img alt=" Micas Mondlane/Oxfam" title=" Micas Mondlane/Oxfam" height="826" width="1240" data-delta="2" typeof="Image" src="http://l.blogs.oxfam/sites/default/files/18059lpr-felix-volunteer-lin-oxfam-1240.jpg" /></p> <p><em>Janete Luciana, is getting information on hygiene and sanitation to prevent Cholera. Volunteer Felix and supervisor Lin are handing out bottles of chlorine to disinfect contaminated water in Mozambique. Photo: Micas Mondlane/Oxfam</em></p> <p><strong>More community 'activistas' are needed to help prevent cholera now</strong></p> <p>We now need you to help us scale up this programme, and fast. To get more than 1,000 community activistas working ASAP so local communities get the health information they need in time to prevent more deaths. And so we can carry on trucking clean water, building toilet facilities and distributing water containers, buckets and soap.</p> <p><a href="https://www.oxfam.org/en/emergencies/cyclone-idai-malawi-mozambique-and-zimbabwe" rel="nofollow"><strong>Donate now to help those affected by Cyclone Idai.</strong></a></p> <p><a href="https://www.oxfam.org/en/emergencies/cyclone-idai-malawi-mozambique-and-zimbabwe" rel="nofollow"><strong></strong></a>To prevent a further health emergency, we need the international community to step up funding to organisations now on the ground to rapidly scale up the response to contain and stop the spread of the cholera.</p> <p><strong>The crisis is still unfolding</strong></p> <p>The full scale of the Cyclone Idai crisis is still unfolding. Many thousands of people are still isolated in difficult to reach areas. The scale of destruction means that reaching people is costly and requires fast and flexible funding.</p> <p>Oxfam’s Humanitarian Program Manager, Ulrich Wagner, led an assessment team by boat to Buzi, one of the hard to reach areas prioritized for the vaccination campaign.</p> <p>“What I saw there was shocking, the perfect breeding ground for cholera. Just by looking at the side of some of the buildings you could see the flood waters had come up to way above my head,” he said.</p> <p>“People were cleaning out what was left of their houses or trying to construct new shelters with any debris they could find. Toilets had been destroyed and were overflowing. We must assume all wells are contaminated but people are forced to still collect water from them. I was told that in some areas people were digging holes in the ground just to find a water source.”</p> <p><img alt=" Sergio Zimba" title=" Sergio Zimba" height="930" width="1240" data-delta="1" typeof="Image" src="http://l.blogs.oxfam/sites/default/files/116168lpr-standing-water-1240.jpg" /></p> <p><em>Survivors of Cyclone Idai in Beira, Mozambique, face water and electricity shortages and are at risk of waterborne diseases carried in contaminated flood water. Photo: Sergio Zimba/Oxfam</em></p> <p><strong>Oxfam is in Mozambique</strong></p> <p>In Mozambique, Oxfam is trucking clean drinking water to more than over 8,000 people living in displacement camps and distributing buckets and soap working as part of a collective of charities and with local partner AJOAGA.</p> <p>A crucial next step in averting health hazards is to build toilets.</p> <p>Last week (3 April), <a href="https://twitter.com/Oxfam/status/1114314776346333184" rel="nofollow">we shipped 38 tonnes of water and sanitation equipment</a> to Beira: the shipment included over a thousand pieces of building material for constructing emergency toilets, over 20 large water containers to collect and store fresh water, 10,000 smaller water containers for people to use to carry and keep water clean and safe, three desludging pumps with generators, and over a hundred tap stands.</p> <p><a rel="nofollow" href="https://www.oxfam.org/en/emergencies/cyclone-idai-malawi-mozambique-and-zimbabwe"><strong>Donate now to Oxfam's flood response</strong></a></p> <p><em><strong>Thank you for your continued support.</strong></em></p> <p><em>Top photo: Julia Pedro (right), a hygiene promotion volunteer for Oxfam. Julia’s family home collapsed and they are living with an aunt now. But still she wants to volunteer because, “these people do not know enough about dangerous diseases like cholera. I want to help them and save their children.” Julia is doing household visit and chlorine distribution in in Praia Nova, a poor area in Beira that has been hit hardest. Credit: Micas Mondlane/Oxfam</em></p> </div><div class="field field-name-title"><h2>Oxfam community activists help prevent cholera after Cyclone Idai in Mozambique</h2></div> Fri, 05 Apr 2019 14:38:26 +0000 Guest Blogger 81927 at http://l.blogs.oxfam http://l.blogs.oxfam/fr/node/81927#comments "I signed up to save lives" - Personal report from Oxfam's Cyclone Idai response http://l.blogs.oxfam/fr/node/81909 <div class="field field-name-body"><p><strong>Stewart Muchapera, Oxfam Media and Communications Lead, gives a personal report from Beira in Mozambique, on our relief efforts after Cyclone Idai devastates southern Africa.</strong></p><p><strong></strong>My alarm clock goes off at 4 am. I had deliberately placed it away from my bed so I would be forced to get up.</p><p><span>For days I had been trying to get on a flight into Beira, the port city in Mozambique where cyclone Idai made landfall, and so I couldn’t afford to miss this one.</span></p><p><span></span><span>As the plane begins its descent into Beira, I get my first glimpse of the damage inflicted by Idai and the floods that preceded it.</span></p><p><span></span><span>I knew Beira had been hit hard – that 90 percent of the city was still under water - yet nothing could have prepared me for what I saw.</span></p><p><span></span><span>Beira resembles a city at war: homes have been razed to the ground as if bombed from the air; some are submerged in water; roofs have been blown away; trees uprooted, and fields and crops flooded.</span></p><p><span><a href="https://www.oxfam.org/en/emergencies/cyclone-idai-malawi-mozambique-and-zimbabwe" rel="nofollow"><strong>Donate now to Oxfam's flood response</strong></a></span></p><p><span><img alt="Cyclone Idai hit landfall on the night of 14-15 March causing extensive damage in Zimbabwe, Malawi and Mozambique with homes, agricultural land completely wiped out in some areas. Credit: Sergio Zimba/Oxfam" title="Cyclone Idai hit landfall on the night of 14-15 March causing extensive damage in Zimbabwe, Malawi and Mozambique with homes, agricultural land completely wiped out in some areas. Credit: Sergio Zimba/Oxfam" height="960" width="1280" class="media-element file-default" data-delta="4" typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://l.blogs.oxfam/sites/default/files/img-20190312-wa0041.jpg" /></span></p><p><em><span>Cyclone Idai hit landfall on the night of 14-15 March causing extensive damage in Zimbabwe, Malawi and Mozambique with homes, agricultural land completely wiped out in some areas. Credit: Sergio Zimba/Oxfam</span></em></p><p><span></span><span>On arrival the airport is abuzz with activity. It’s the only place in Beira with functional telecommunications so the United Nations and many international aid agencies have made it their base – and this is where I will be living for the coming days.</span></p><p><span></span><span>Much of the building resembles a war room: maps cover the walls and everywhere; men and women are huddled together trying to work out how to get aid out to people in desperate need.</span></p><p><span></span><span>There is the constant noise of helicopters and planes taking off with emergency supplies for areas in the city and beyond that are only accessible by air.</span></p><p><span></span><span>Oxfam too is working a local partner organization, AJOAGO, trying to organize a helicopter to distribute family kits to communities in Buzi, one of the worst hit areas of the city where families are reported to be living on the rooftops of flooded houses.</span></p><p><span></span><span>Each family kit contains blankets, a bucket, mosquito nets, a jerry can, spoons and cloth wrappers. The hope is these kits will help prevent the spread of deadly diseases such as cholera and malaria.</span></p><p><span><img alt="Survivors of Cyclone Idai in Beira, Mozambique, face water and electricity shortages and are at risk of waterborne diseases carried in contaminated flood water. Credit: Sergio Zimba/Oxfam" title="Survivors of Cyclone Idai in Beira, Mozambique, face water and electricity shortages and are at risk of waterborne diseases carried in contaminated flood water. Credit: Sergio Zimba/Oxfam" height="1125" width="1500" class="media-element file-default" data-delta="1" typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://l.blogs.oxfam/sites/default/files/116169lpr-water-and-electricity-shortages-1500.jpg" /></span></p><p><em><span>Survivors of Cyclone Idai in Beira, Mozambique, face water and electricity shortages and are at risk of waterborne diseases carried in contaminated flood water. Credit: Sergio Zimba/Oxfam</span></em></p><p><span></span><span>While we are waiting for the flight, I head for Dondo, about 30 kilometers out of Beira, where a camp has been set up for displaced people. With my notebook and camera, I spend the afternoon listening to inspirational men and women who, despite losing everything, still wear a smile on the weary faces.</span></p><p><span></span><span>“There is nothing we could have done - we were in its path. We lost everything - our homes, blankets and food. We are waiting for the rains to subside so that we can go home and rebuild,” said Jacinta Verisha, a mother of four who lost her home and now living in a tent donated by <a href="https://www.fdfa.be/en/grant-to-oxfam-solidarity-for-coordination-of-cosaca-consortium-in-mozambique-2018" rel="nofollow">COSACA</a>, a consortium of aid agencies including Oxfam, Care and Save the Children.&nbsp;</span></p><p><span></span><span>As I bid farewell to Jacinta l wonder how long she will have to stay in the camp. Will she and her family make it home? Will her kids get back to school? Will they survive the outbreaks of disease such as malaria or cholera that so often strike in the aftermath of major disasters?</span></p><p><span><img alt="The Indian Navy rescue men, women and children stranded by Cyclone Idai in Buzi and surrounding islands, Mozambique. Photo: Tina Kruger/Oxfam" title="The Indian Navy rescue men, women and children stranded by Cyclone Idai in Buzi and surrounding islands, Mozambique. Photo: Tina Kruger/Oxfam" height="872" width="1500" class="media-element file-default" data-delta="2" typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://l.blogs.oxfam/sites/default/files/116163-indian-navy-rescue-boats-tina-kruger-1500.jpg" /></span></p><p><em><span>The Indian Navy rescue men, women and children stranded by Cyclone Idai in Buzi and surrounding islands, Mozambique. Photo: Tina Kruger/Oxfam</span></em></p><p><span></span><span>How many more people like Jacinta will I meet? How many more people will have their lives turned upside down as climate change brings more frequent and more destructive weather to our continent?</span></p><p><span></span><span>What I do know is that Oxfam, and our supporters across the globe, will make a huge difference to people like Jacinta, providing emergency assistance such as clean water and shelter to people who desperately need help now and helping people rebuild their communities, and their lives, in the months and years ahead.</span></p><p><span></span><span>I signed up to work at Oxfam to help save lives – being here in Beira is stark reminder of my commitment.</span></p><p><span><img alt="Survivors of Cyclone Idai shelter in abandoned buildings in Mozambique. Photo: Sergio Zimba/Oxfam" title="Survivors of Cyclone Idai shelter in abandoned buildings in Mozambique. Photo: Sergio Zimba/Oxfam" height="984" width="1500" class="media-element file-default" data-delta="3" typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://l.blogs.oxfam/sites/default/files/116165lpr-house-contents-sergio-1500.jpg" /></span></p><p><span></span><em>This entry posted on 25 March 2019, by Stewart Muchapera, Oxfam Media and Communications Lead, writing from Beira in Mozambique.</em></p><p><a href="https://www.oxfam.org/en/emergencies/cyclone-idai-malawi-mozambique-and-zimbabwe" rel="nofollow"><strong>Donate now to Oxfam's flood response</strong></a></p></div><div class="field field-name-title"><h2>&quot;I signed up to save lives&quot; - Personal report from Oxfam&#039;s Cyclone Idai response</h2></div> Mon, 25 Mar 2019 13:17:06 +0000 Guest Blogger 81909 at http://l.blogs.oxfam http://l.blogs.oxfam/fr/node/81909#comments Five things crisis-affected Syrians need right now http://l.blogs.oxfam/fr/node/81894 <div class="field field-name-body"><p><strong>On 15 March 2019, it will be eight years since the war in Syria started. Hundreds of thousands of people have been killed, and many are displaced. 11.7 million people need aid. While in many parts of the country, the violence has subsided, people are still looking for safety and are desperately trying to rebuild their lives.</strong></p><p><span>While there is, and has been support for life-saving aid, support to help people recover is limited. The international community is increasingly reluctant to support activities that it thinks could, in one way or another, strengthen the government of Syria. At the same time, the Syrian government’s restrictions on humanitarian agencies continue to hinder access to people in need.</span></p><p><span></span><span>This must and can change. Here's why:</span></p><p><span></span><strong><span>1. Syrians want to rebuild their homes</span></strong></p><p>Many are returning to homes that have been destroyed, to neighborhoods that have been razed to the ground.</p><p><span>Zohair, 58, lives in east Aleppo’s al-Zbdieh. Throughout the conflict, he and his family of 12 faced tremendous difficulties. They survived, but their house needs much work before it can be called a home.</span></p><p><span></span><span>Oxfam is helping rehabilitate some 250 damaged apartments in east Aleppo. This has spared many, like Zohair, the burden of having to repair their home entirely on their own.&nbsp;</span></p><p><span><img alt="Zohair* was one of many people who benefited from the Oxfam-led apartment rehabilitation project in Aleppo. Photo: Islam Mardini/Oxfam *Name changed. " title="Zohair* was one of many people who benefited from the Oxfam-led apartment rehabilitation project in Aleppo. Photo: Islam Mardini/Oxfam *Name changed. " height="826" width="1240" class="media-element file-default" data-delta="1" typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://l.blogs.oxfam/sites/default/files/115970-rebuild-house-1240.jpg" /></span></p><p><em>Zohair*, 58, lives in east Aleppo’s al-Zbdieh. Throughout the conflict, he and his family of 12 faced tremendous difficulties, including having to flee for safety, several times. They benefited from the Oxfam-led apartment rehabilitation project. Photo: Islam Mardini/Oxfam *Name changed.</em></p><p><span></span><strong><span>2. They need safe clean water</span></strong></p><p><span></span><span>Fadi is one of many people who have returned to Eastern Ghouta’s Arbin. Though the fighting has subsided, and the security conditions relatively improved, the 45-year-old is facing other challenges that pose a risk to his five-member family, like contaminated water.</span></p><p><span></span><span>Oxfam is helping rehabilitate sewage networks in different neighborhoods in Eastern Ghouta. This helps to ensure the water in people’s homes is safe and clean, lowering the spread of water-borne diseases.</span></p><p><span><img alt="Fadi*, 45, recently returned to Eastern Ghouta’s Arbin, where Oxfam is replacing old, broken sewage pipelines with new ones. Photo: Dania Kareh/Oxfam *Name changed." title="Fadi*, 45, recently returned to Eastern Ghouta’s Arbin, where Oxfam is replacing old, broken sewage pipelines with new ones. Photo: Dania Kareh/Oxfam *Name changed." height="827" width="1240" class="media-element file-default" data-delta="2" typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://l.blogs.oxfam/sites/default/files/3-fadi-clean-water-1240.jpg" /></span></p><p></p><p><em>“My family and I fled Eastern Ghouta six years ago when the situation became unbearable. We left everything behind. Now we’re back, but my house is damaged, and wastewater always floods the streets,” Fadi*, 45, told us.</em><br><em>Oxfam is replacing old, broken sewage pipelines with new ones in Fadi's neighborhood, in order to avoid potential health risks. Photo: Dania Kareh/Oxfam *Name changed.</em></p><p><span></span><strong><span>3. They don’t want handouts, they want food to be available</span></strong></p><p><span></span><span>Rather than handout bread and other food items, Oxfam is focusing on helping people make a living and provide food for themselves. This includes the distribution of seeds, basic tools and animal fodder to farmers, providing cash-for-work opportunities, and supporting women and men gain new skills through vocational training.</span></p><p><span></span><span>Nouf, 44, fled her home in rural Aleppo’s Huajjeneh during the fighting. Although the mother of seven has recently returned with her family, she faces many difficulties – like hundreds of thousands of other women in Syria who must now provide for their families. To do that, she must overcome limited opportunities and defy social norms.</span></p><p><span></span><span>Oxfam has provided 250 vulnerable families in rural Aleppo with chickens and chicken feed to help them make a living. The eggs produced provide a source of both food and income.</span></p><p><span></span><span>“The eggs will help improve my children’s diet and we will sell the rest to earn some money to help us buy basic items we really need such as clothes and medicines,” Nouf tells Oxfam.</span></p><p><span><img alt="Nouf*, 44, recently returned to her home in Aleppo, after fleeing with her family during the fighting. Photo: Dania Kareh *Name changed." title="Nouf*, 44, recently returned to her home in Aleppo, after fleeing with her family during the fighting. Photo: Dania Kareh *Name changed." height="827" width="1240" class="media-element file-default" data-delta="3" typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://l.blogs.oxfam/sites/default/files/4-nouf-chickens-1240.jpg" /></span></p><p><em>Nouf*, 44, recently returned to her home in Aleppo, after fleeing with her family during the fighting. Oxfam is helping people like Nouf rebuild their lives and become less aid-dependent. Photo: Dania Kareh *Name changed.</em></p><p><span></span><strong>4. Children need functional schools</strong></p><p><strong></strong><span>It’s the first school year for six-year-old Sham who fled with her family the violence in Harasta, Rural Damascus. Prior to Oxfam’s rehabilitating the water system and toilets, Sham* would not drink from the fountain. Similarly, her schoolmate, Noura*, would avoid using the one available bathroom because “it was smelly.”</span></p><p><span></span><span>In 2018, Oxfam fixed the water networks and toilets of 16 schools in Damascus, providing over 27,000 children with access to safe, clean water, and reducing public health risks associated with poor sanitation and water-borne diseases. </span></p><p><span>We are currently rehabilitating seven schools in eastern Ghouta and we hope to continue such planned projects in eastern Ghouta, at-Tal and Zabadani.</span></p><p><span></span><span>This helps provide a semblance of normalcy to these kids’ lives.</span></p><p><span><img alt="Oxfam is currently rehabilitating water networks and toilets in seven schools in eastern Ghouta. Photo: Dania Kareh/Oxfam" title="Oxfam is currently rehabilitating water networks and toilets in seven schools in eastern Ghouta. Photo: Dania Kareh/Oxfam" height="827" width="1240" class="media-element file-default" data-delta="4" typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://l.blogs.oxfam/sites/default/files/5-school-1240.jpg" /></span></p><p><em><span>Oxfam is currently rehabilitating water networks and toilets in seven schools in eastern Ghouta. Photo: Dania Kareh/Oxfam *Names changed.</span></em></p><p><span></span><strong>5. Above all, Syrians need peace</strong></p><p><strong></strong><span>The humanitarian response in Syria is significantly underfunded. </span></p><p><span>The International Community must do more to support vulnerable people, no matter where in Syria they live. </span></p><p><span>The Government of Syria must provide unhindered humanitarian access to ensure all its citizens can access the basic services and humanitarian support they require.</span></p><p><span></span><span>World leaders must stop fueling the conflict and push for a durable, Syrian-led, and inclusive peace. </span></p><p><span>All parties to the conflict and those with influence over them should work to stop the violence. And help Syrians get back on their feet and rebuild their lives.</span></p><p><span><img alt="Mohammad, 66, sits in front of his home in Eastern Ghouta. Oxfam is helping rehabilitate sewage networks in his neighborhood. Photo: Dania Kareh/Oxfam" title="Mohammad, 66, sits in front of his home in Eastern Ghouta. Oxfam is helping rehabilitate sewage networks in his neighborhood. Photo: Dania Kareh/Oxfam" height="827" width="1240" class="media-element file-default" data-delta="5" typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://l.blogs.oxfam/sites/default/files/1-mohammad-1240.jpg" /></span></p><p><em><span>Mohammad, 66, sits in front of his home in Eastern Ghouta. Oxfam is helping rehabilitate sewage networks in his neighborhood. Photo: Dania Kareh/Oxfam</span></em></p><p><span></span><em><span>This entry posted on 13 March 2019, by Nadine Mazloum, Oxfam's Syria Crisis Response Media Advisor.</span></em></p><p><em>Top photo:&nbsp;Wadha, who lives in Deir Ez-Zor, is one of many people benefiting from Oxfam’s cash-for-work program. Credit: Dania Kareh/Oxfam</em></p></div><div class="field field-name-title"><h2>Five things crisis-affected Syrians need right now</h2></div> Wed, 13 Mar 2019 17:40:43 +0000 Guest Blogger 81894 at http://l.blogs.oxfam http://l.blogs.oxfam/fr/node/81894#comments Yolanda on My Mind: The Odyssey of a Humanitarian Worker http://l.blogs.oxfam/fr/node/81774 <div class="field field-name-body"><p><strong>Humanitarian workers are regularly confronted by difficult choices.</strong></p><p>What humanitarian worker hasn't been stuck in a situation where good intentions are not enough, in the face of bad or worse options? As a frontline emergency responder for almost ten years, I have been in situations where every decision or step I made had no easy answers.</p><p>With Yolanda, globally known as <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Typhoon_Haiyan" rel="nofollow">Super Typhoon Haiyan</a>, we had to make the choice of trailing the powerful storm with the belief that people will need life-saving support. In so doing, staff were necessarily thrown in a vast sea of uncertainty. In the affected areas, we had to veritably knock on doors, asking who could offer us a place to stay or lend us vehicles, so that we could reach the hardest hit areas quickly. We had to step forward, then pivot when needed, and then step sideways - always having to trust that doing something is better than doing nothing.</p><h3>Yolanda’s staggering destruction</h3><p>Yolanda swept through eastern provinces of 591 towns and 57 cities in 44 of the country’s 80 provinces. The massive rainfall lasted until the midnight of Friday, and by the following day we flew in three rapid assessment teams to badly hit areas of Eastern Samar, Tacloban City, and, Northern Cebu.</p><p>My team in Davao spent our weekend in the office to monitor the development.&nbsp; Still vexed with what was going on, I came to an international conference in Davao where I was scheduled to deliver a talk.&nbsp;</p><p>Close to about 9 AM, I received a call from the Manila to pick up my plane ticket which would fly me to Cebu around 12 noon, where we established our base of operation, even as we struggled to connect with our assessment teams.</p><p><img alt="Typhoon Haiyan in numbers" title="Typhoon Haiyan in numbers" height="1200" width="1200" class="media-element file-default" data-delta="2" typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://l.blogs.oxfam/sites/default/files/haiyan-in-numbers_final.jpg" /></p><p><strong>By Wednesday our response was rolling</strong> in Northern Cebu and Tacloban, but the situation in Eastern Samar was still largely unknown. By the following Saturday, I was asked to fly in to Borongan with a couple of staff of Morong Volunteers Emergency Response Team to scope the impact areas.</p><p>The destruction wrought by the strongest typhoon ever recorded in modern Philippine history has been staggering. In its wake, Yolanda had left at least 6,200 dead, 28,600 injured, 550,900 houses destroyed and 589,400 more were damaged.</p><p>The full monetary value of the impact of Yolanda range from USD13 to 14.5 billion. The estimated damage to agriculture was at $225 million.</p><p>From my perspective, this figure appears to be a small fraction of the actual losses but what was clear was that poorest villages bore the heaviest brunt.</p><p>Within the next three weeks, our global humanitarian team were fully set up.&nbsp; I went back to my post in Davao with all the harrowing experiences of the dead and missing, of devastated lives and livelihoods which will haunt me for years.</p><p><img alt="Oxfam response to Typhoon Haiyan (Yolanda)" title="Oxfam response to Typhoon Haiyan (Yolanda)" height="1200" width="1200" class="media-element file-default" data-delta="1" typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://l.blogs.oxfam/sites/default/files/oxfam-response-1200x1200.jpg" /></p><h3>Transitioning from emergency- to long-term recovery responses</h3><p>About a year and a half after Yolanda hit, I was asked to manage the transition of our emergency response to long term recovery. At that time, only a tiny fraction of displaced families has been relocated to permanent shelters on safer grounds.&nbsp;</p><p>Minimum liveability standards – e.g., safe drinking water, adequate sanitation, affordable electricity services, proximity to health and education services and livelihood opportunities – still seemed to be beyond reach.</p><p>Displaced families were still uncertain over when and where they would be moved, as they have lived the lives of beneficiaries rather than stakeholders in finding lasting solutions.&nbsp;</p><p><strong>Their perspectives were not represented</strong> in decision making processes that affected their lives in a profound sense. This, while they endured individual and community living which was marked by increasing insecurity and instability, with less access to income-generating opportunities, disrupted schooling and mobility, minimal protection from the elements, and minimal privacy and practical necessities for one’s bodily integrity, including sexual and reproductive health and well-being.</p><p>Indeed, the sheer scale of devastation brought about by Yolanda would challenge any government. With its complexities, Yolanda also forced aid agencies like Oxfam to confront the question that has animated the aid sector for a long time, which is, whether or not there is such a thing as ‘natural’ disasters.&nbsp; For sure there are unnatural events which could greatly challenge the ability of even some of the strongest countries.&nbsp;</p><p>What is clear is that disasters become inevitable if preparedness is lacking.</p><p><img alt="Typhoon Haiyan - rebulding homes" title="Typhoon Haiyan - rebulding homes" height="1084" width="1200" class="media-element file-default" data-delta="3" typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://l.blogs.oxfam/sites/default/files/sharequote-1-final.jpg" /></p><h3>Building local leadership and capabilities</h3><p>The list of things to do on preparedness, which Oxfam has now been investing in heavily, include building local capabilities – of local governments and local NGOS – to mount a speedy and sizeable response.</p><p>Fully capable local humanitarian actors will ensure that the emergency response will be ‘as local as possible and only as international as necessary’.</p><p>It will also help keep international organisations like Oxfam stay focused on reinforcing and not replacing local systems, where we can deploy our expertise on compliance to humanitarian standards.</p><p><strong>Yolanda also forced us to <a href="https://policy-practice.oxfam.org.uk/blog/2013/12/after-haiyan-crucial-steps-in-the-path-to-recovery" rel="nofollow">re-think</a></strong><a href="https://policy-practice.oxfam.org.uk/blog/2013/12/after-haiyan-crucial-steps-in-the-path-to-recovery" rel="nofollow"> some of our strategies</a> on development programming which could potentially shrink our humanitarian footprint.</p><p>Top of this is a rational land use planning system which will move vital infrastructures, economic investments, and vulnerable communities away from geo-hazard areas.</p><p>To this I add that investing in sophisticated early warning system which could stretch the lead time for civil and military apparatuses to be able to kick off their contingency plans.</p><p><img alt="Typhoon Haiyan - preserving people&#039;s dignity" title="Typhoon Haiyan - preserving people&#039;s dignity" height="1093" width="1200" class="media-element file-default" data-delta="4" typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://l.blogs.oxfam/sites/default/files/sharequote-2-final.jpg" /></p><h3>The role of the private sector</h3><p>Incentivising the entry of private sector into insurance markets should a matter of public policy priority so that losses could be mitigated when a discrete event like Yolanda becomes inevitable.&nbsp;</p><p>An increase on insurance coverage/penetration is inversely correlated with public spending for rehabilitation and recovery or reduces the tax burden on the people.</p><p>Damage to school buildings, public market, rural health clinics, bus terminals and similar infrastructural investments meant that recovering losses require painful tradeoffs in terms of what other basic services would have to be foregone such as primary health, education, and similar investments in development.</p><p>For private sector in particular, business continuity planning needs to be part of its operations to minimise disruptions which discrete events invariably entail which oftentimes reverberate into the rural economies.</p><h3>Are we ready for the next one?</h3><p>Steps such as land use planning, early warning system, risk transfers, and business continuity planning are what falls into the cracks between the highly compartmentalised zones of humanitarian and development discourses, where you have emergency preparedness and response on one hand and macroeconomics (e.g., fiscal stability, employment, and, inflation) on the other.</p><p>Today, as we celebrate the fifth anniversary of Yolanda, it is necessary to confront the difficult question: are we ready for the next one?</p><p><em>This entry posted on 8 November 2018, by Dante Dalabajan, Senior Manager of Oxfam in the Philippines where he manages a team of advisors and specialists on humanitarian and development programming, campaigning, and aid response.</em></p><p><em>Top photo: Scene from Oxfam Assessment Team while surveying the impact of Typhoon Haiyan, just days after it hit in Samar, Philippines. Credit: Jire Carreon/Oxfam</em></p><p><strong>Read more<br></strong></p><p><strong><a href="https://blogs.oxfam.org/en/tags/philippines">Blogs about Oxfam in the Philippines</a><br></strong></p><p><a href="https://www.oxfam.org/en/emergencies" rel="nofollow"><strong>More on Oxfam's humanitarian work</strong></a></p><p></p></div><div class="field field-name-title"><h2>Yolanda on My Mind: The Odyssey of a Humanitarian Worker</h2></div> Thu, 08 Nov 2018 14:12:38 +0000 Guest Blogger 81774 at http://l.blogs.oxfam http://l.blogs.oxfam/fr/node/81774#comments Five things I’ve learned being a humanitarian aid worker http://l.blogs.oxfam/fr/node/81682 <div class="field field-name-body"><p><strong>This World Humanitarian Day, Iffat Tahmid Fatema, Oxfam public health worker, shares what it's like helping people in our Rohingya refugee response in Bangladesh.</strong></p><p>I started working for Oxfam last year at the height of the emergency when Rohingya refugees were arriving in huge numbers every day. At that time, I was toiling in a lab at the Asian University for Women in Chittagong pursuing my Master's degree in Bio-Technology, but I knew I wanted to work with real people, face-to-face. What's happened to the Rohingya people really upset me. I had never seen people living with so little. It really hurt me.</p><p>Now I teach Rohingya refugees living in the camp in Cox's Bazar about health and hygiene, to help them keep well and to prevent a major outbreak of disease. We discuss the importance of cleanliness and personal hygiene like washing your hands with soap after going to the toilet and before eating. We work with volunteers from the Rohingya community, training them so they can teach other refugees and spread good hygiene messages far and wide. The Oxfam team <a href="https://www.oxfam.org/en/emergencies/bangladesh-rohingya-refugee-crisis" rel="nofollow">has reached more than 266,000 people </a>in the camps so far.</p><p><img alt="Iffat Tahimd Fatema, humanitarian public health promoter for Oxfam, at work in the Rohingya refugee camps in Cox&#039;s Bazar, Bangladesh. Photo: Abbie Trayler-Smith/Oxfam" title="Iffat Tahimd Fatema, humanitarian public health promoter for Oxfam, at work in the Rohingya refugee camps in Cox&#039;s Bazar, Bangladesh. Photo: Abbie Trayler-Smith/Oxfam" height="826" width="1240" class="media-element file-default" data-delta="1" typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://l.blogs.oxfam/sites/default/files/113471lpr-smiling-1240.jpg" /></p><h3>1. Know what motivates you</h3><p>In this job you need drive, good communication skills, and initiative.</p><p>When it's extremely hot, or raining heavily, or you’re tired, you might not feel like spending another long day in the camps. But then you think of the refugees and how you are working for them - that motivates you to keep going.</p><p><img alt="Iffat Tahimd Fatema, humanitarian public health promoter for Oxfam, in the Rohingya refugee camps, Cox&#039;s Bazar, Bangladesh. Photo: Abbie Trayler-Smith/Oxfam" title="Iffat Tahimd Fatema, humanitarian public health promoter for Oxfam, in the Rohingya refugee camps, Cox&#039;s Bazar, Bangladesh. Photo: Abbie Trayler-Smith/Oxfam" height="814" width="1240" class="media-element file-default" data-delta="2" typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://l.blogs.oxfam/sites/default/files/113467lpr-teaching1-1240.jpg" /></p><h3>2. You have to build trust</h3><p>Humanitarian work is also about building trust. You have to be sensitive to local culture and traditions.</p><p>You also have to be able to talk to different groups of people in different ways, from children to older people and Imams, the religious leaders. And you need to be a good observer so you can try to understand how people think.</p><p><img alt="Iffat Tahimd Fatema, humanitarian public health promoter for Oxfam, in the Rohingya refugee camps, Cox&#039;s Bazar, Bangladesh. Photo: Abbie Trayler-Smith/Oxfam" title="Iffat Tahimd Fatema, humanitarian public health promoter for Oxfam, in the Rohingya refugee camps, Cox&#039;s Bazar, Bangladesh. Photo: Abbie Trayler-Smith/Oxfam" height="826" width="1240" class="media-element file-default" data-delta="3" typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://l.blogs.oxfam/sites/default/files/113454lpr-looking-3-1240.jpg" /></p><h3>3. Speak their language</h3><p>Sometimes the refugees can be uncomfortable with someone who is not like them, so it helps that I can speak a similar language. But the language is also the biggest challenge as the regional language, Chittagonian, is only about 70 per cent the same as Rohingya.</p><p>Oxfam has worked with Translators Against Borders to develop <a href="https://www.npr.org/sections/goatsandsoda/2018/07/22/630858182/finding-the-right-words-to-help-rohingya-refugees" rel="nofollow">a new translation app</a> in English, Bangla and Rohingya, including specific vocabulary about health and hygiene, so this will be a big help.</p><p><img alt="Iffat Tahimd Fatema, humanitarian public health promoter for Oxfam, Rohingya refugee camps, Cox&#039;s Bazar, Bangladesh. Photo: Abbie Trayler-Smith/Oxfam" title="Iffat Tahimd Fatema, humanitarian public health promoter for Oxfam, Rohingya refugee camps, Cox&#039;s Bazar, Bangladesh. Photo: Abbie Trayler-Smith/Oxfam" height="826" width="1240" class="media-element file-default" data-delta="4" typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://l.blogs.oxfam/sites/default/files/113465lpr-carrying4-1240.jpg" /></p><h3>4. Be prepared to face challenges</h3><p>Working in the monsoons has been extremely hard and can be dangerous. When there is a heavy downpour of rain, conditions in the camps become very bad, very quickly. You can sink into the mud and lose your boots. When you climb the dirt steps there is the possibility the whole thing will collapse.</p><h3>5. Patience is a virtue</h3><p>The most important thing I have learnt is to be polite and be patient - even though I might be repeating the same thing hundreds of times, such as how to wash your hands. I am very impatient by nature, but working in the camps I have learned how to control my frustrations.</p><p>The most satisfying part of my job has been hearing from refugees what a difference Oxfam’s support has made to them.</p><p>We run regular listening groups where the community can give us constructive feedback. Recently a grandfather told me: "We are happy that you come and you listen to us. Thank you for the work you do."</p><p>That made me feel very happy.</p><p><em>This entry posted on 18 August 2018 by Iffat Tahmid Fatema, humanitarian public health worker for <a href="https://www.oxfam.org/en/emergencies/bangladesh-rohingya-refugee-crisis" rel="nofollow">Oxfam’s Rohingya refugee response in Bangladesh</a></em><em>, as part of our World Humanitarian Day program.<br></em></p><p><em>All photos: Iffat Tahimd Fatema, humanitarian public health promoter for Oxfam, in the Rohingya refugee camps, Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh. Credit: Abbie Trayler-Smith/Oxfam<br></em></p><p></p></div><div class="field field-name-title"><h2>Five things I’ve learned being a humanitarian aid worker</h2></div> Fri, 17 Aug 2018 23:07:07 +0000 Guest Blogger 81682 at http://l.blogs.oxfam http://l.blogs.oxfam/fr/node/81682#comments Pushing for peace in Gaza http://l.blogs.oxfam/fr/node/81667 <div class="field field-name-body"><p><strong>Israel’s more-than ten year blockade on Gaza has had <a href="https://news.sky.com/story/locked-in-the-devastating-effects-of-israels-gaza-blockade-11389198" rel="nofollow">devastating consequences</a>, with </strong><strong>life-saving aid destined for water, sanitation and health care being blocked. Alison Martin, Oxfam Policy and Campaigns Manager, </strong><strong>reflects on the <a href="https://www.oxfam.org/en/research/israel-tightens-gaza-blockade-civilians-bear-brunt" rel="nofollow">impact </a>of new restrictions and lays out the <a href="https://www.oxfam.org/en/research/israel-tightens-gaza-blockade-civilians-bear-brunt" rel="nofollow">urgent steps toward peace</a> and progress in Gaza.</strong></p><p>Last time I was in Gaza I was seven months pregnant and I left hoping that by the time my son was born, things might be better for babies born in Gaza – because it was hard to imagine they could get any worse.</p><p>That was over a year ago and in July the Israeli government announced what has been <a href="https://www.aljazeera.com/indepth/features/penalty-gaza-merchants-suffer-trade-crossing-shuts-180713124155794.html" rel="nofollow"><strong>described as a death penalty</strong></a> for Gaza’s economy: a further tightening of Israel’s unlawful blockade on Gaza, shutting down the Strip’s main commercial crossing, stopping urgent fuel and gas imports and forcing vital donor-funded construction to a standstill.</p><p>The Israeli government imposed these measures in response to individuals and groups sending flaming kites and balloons out of Gaza. However these measures punish everyone in Gaza - civilians, children – people who have done nothing to deserve it.</p><p><img alt="Khalil Al-Najjar, a fisherman at Khanyounis anchorage, Southern Gaza. Photo: Hussam Salem/Oxfam" title="Khalil Al-Najjar, a fisherman at Khanyounis anchorage, Southern Gaza. Photo: Hussam Salem/Oxfam" height="680" width="1240" class="media-element file-default" data-delta="4" typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://l.blogs.oxfam/sites/default/files/fisherman-3f9b8317-1240x680.jpg" /></p><p><em>Khalil Al-Najjar, a fisherman at Khanyounis anchorage, Southern Gaza. Photo: Hussam Salem/Oxfam</em></p><h3>What do the latest restrictions mean?</h3><p>The closure also means farmers can’t export their produce, which will now go to waste, and Israel has further reduced the permitted fishing zone – already a fraction of what was decreed under the Oslo accords - so it’s even harder to make a decent catch. Eleven-year-old Ghaleb recently told Oxfam his father used to catch ten or twenty kilograms of fish, now it’s just one or even a half kilogram.</p><p>“It becomes scary,” Ghaleb said. “Whoever goes out deeper into the sea will be arrested and they will confiscate their equipment.”</p><p>Every day that Gaza’s crossing is closed means many children wait even longer for access to safe water and toilets – basic rights that we take for granted. At least 97% of the water in Gaza is undrinkable and <a href="https://www.unicef.org/wash/oPt_100684.html" rel="nofollow"><strong>nearly one quarter of the population</strong></a> is not connected to a sewage network- the combined result of 50 years of Israeli occupation compounded by recurrent conflict. Water-related diseases are the <strong><a href="http://apps.who.int/gb/Statements/Report_Palestinian_territory/Report_Palestinian_territory-en.pdf" rel="nofollow">primary cause of child morbidity</a></strong> and estimated to account for over a quarter of illnesses in Gaza. And the Israeli government’s latest restrictions threaten to exacerbate this already grim situation.</p><p>In the water sector alone, projects currently being blocked include: a major desalination plant in Gaza city that would provide water to 200,000 people, water tanks and a water booster system that would provide water to over 190,000 people, and facilities that would treat wastewater for hundreds of thousands of households and reduce the sewage contamination currently being pumped into the sea.</p><p>The crossing was partially reopened on 24 July 2018 to allow some fuel and gas, however <strong><a href="https://www.i24news.tv/en/news/international/middle-east/180774-180801-liberman-bans-fuel-gas-entering-gaza-through-kerem-shalom-crossing" rel="nofollow">the ban was reinstated</a></strong> from 2 August. The only items currently being allowed into Gaza are food, medicine and animal fodder on a case-by-case basis.</p><p><img alt="Millions of liters of sewage are discharged off the coast of Gaza every day. Photo: Sami Alhaw/Oxfam" title="Millions of liters of sewage are discharged off the coast of Gaza every day. Photo: Sami Alhaw/Oxfam" height="827" width="1240" class="media-element file-default" data-delta="2" typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://l.blogs.oxfam/sites/default/files/sewage-discharged-into-coast-off-gaza-every-day-oxfam-2017.jpg" /></p><p><em>Millions of liters of sewage are discharged off the coast of Gaza every day. Credit: Sami Alhaw/Oxfam</em></p><h3>Does anyone care?</h3><p>Maybe.</p><p>But the question is, does anyone care enough to hold the Israeli Government responsible for the man made humanitarian disaster that continues to intensify in Gaza? The answer – at least for the moment - feels to me like ‘no.’</p><p>The closure means that no items are permitted to enter even via the internationally-funded <strong><a href="https://grm.report/" rel="nofollow">Gaza Reconstruction Mechanism</a></strong> (GRM), established by the UN to facilitate the entry of construction materials and a range of items classified by Israel as ‘dual use’ and therefore heavily controlled (as Israel asserts these items may also have a military application).</p><p>The UK, Germany, the Netherlands, Norway and Australia are still funding the mechanism but have <a href="https://www.oxfam.org/en/research/treading-water-worsening-water-crisis-and-gaza-reconstruction-mechanism" rel="nofollow"><strong>failed to effectively hold Israel accountable</strong></a> to allow construction and economic development at the pace needed to help Gaza. Although initiated as a temporary mechanism, the GRM remains in place today.</p><p>Water, health and sanitation projects amounting to tens of millions of US dollars, funded by international donors, are currently being blocked by Israeli government-imposed restrictions.</p><p>And that’s just one of several vital sectors impacted by the blockade.</p><p><img alt="Oxfam supported Hoda Hassan, mother of 6, with an entrepreneurial course which helped her open a shop, in Gaza. Photo: Adeline Guerra/Oxfam" title="Oxfam supported Hoda Hassan, mother of 6, with an entrepreneurial course which helped her open a shop, in Gaza. Photo: Adeline Guerra/Oxfam" height="800" width="1200" class="media-element file-default" data-delta="1" typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://l.blogs.oxfam/sites/default/files/hoda-0w0a7319-1200.jpg" /></p><p><em><em>Oxfam supported Hoda Hassan, mother of 6, with an entrepreneurial course which helped her open a shop in what used to be her children’s bedroom in Gaza. She hopes to use the profits to build an extension so her kids no longer need to sleep in the living room. Unemployment among women in Gaza is 71%. Credit: Adeline Guerra/Oxfam</em></em></p><h3>What can we do about it?</h3><p>A lot.</p><p>If you were paying millions of dollars to build infrastructure, wouldn’t you push for accountability to ensure it was done?</p><p>Impunity remains a major obstacle to economic recovery. Without effective accountability and pressure on parties to allow construction and promote economic development, there is little hope for progress or justice for Palestinians in Gaza.</p><p>Aid agencies in Gaza are <strong><a href="https://www.oxfam.org/en/research/israel-tightens-gaza-blockade-civilians-bear-brunt" rel="nofollow">calling for immediate action</a></strong> to address the causes of the deepening crisis, including demanding the reversal of recent restrictions on imports and exports. We condemn violence against civilians on all sides, including the shooting of Palestinian civilians by Israeli snipers, and indiscriminate rocket fire and incendiary kites and balloons sent from Gaza. Both Palestinians and Israelis deserve peace and to live in dignity without fear of violence or oppression.</p><p>Israel’s <strong><a href="http://gisha.org/en-blog/2017/04/20/the-dual-use-list-finally-gets-published-but-its-the-opposite-of-useful/" rel="nofollow">‘dual use’ list</a></strong> must be urgently and continuously challenged and essential items to support the water, electricity and health sectors should be immediately removed from the list.</p><p>Israel must be held accountable to allow the entry of items essential for the provision of basic services to protect public health in Gaza.</p><h3><img alt="An 11-year-old in Gaza has never experienced a full day of electricity. Photo: Adeline Guerra/Oxfam" title="An 11-year-old in Gaza has never experienced a full day of electricity. Photo: Adeline Guerra/Oxfam" height="525" width="350" style="float: right; margin: 0px 0px 10px 20px;" class="media-element file-default" data-delta="3" typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://l.blogs.oxfam/sites/default/files/boys-in-truck-0w0a7451-350x525.jpg" />End the Gaza blockade</h3><p>These are the initial urgent steps we recommend are taken towards fully ending the blockade.</p><p>Until that happens, international assistance - including funding directed toward economic development - will be severely hampered by the blockade. In the context of an unlawful blockade, aid remains vital however is vulnerable to political and often punitive measures imposed unilaterally, with devastating and immediate impacts on civilians.</p><p>Until accountability is prioritized, babies will continue to be born into homes without safe water, at risk of disease and death, as people are prevented from supporting themselves and even international aid can’t make it through the blockade.</p><p><strong><a href="https://www.oxfam.org/en/research/israel-tightens-gaza-blockade-civilians-bear-brunt" rel="nofollow">Read Oxfam’s latest report on Gaza</a>.</strong> <br><br><em>This entry posted by Alison Martin (<a href="https://twitter.com/ali_m_martin" rel="nofollow">@ali_m_martin</a>), Oxfam Policy and Campaigns Manager, on 3 August 2018.</em></p><p><em>Top photo: Gaza sunset. <em>Families receive around only 4 hours of electricity daily. An 11-year-old in Gaza has never experienced a full day of electricity. <em>Credit: Adeline Guerra/Oxfam</em></em><br></em></p><p><em>Bottom photo: Boys in a truck. Credit: Adeline Guerra/Oxfam</em></p></div><div class="field field-name-title"><h2>Pushing for peace in Gaza</h2></div> Fri, 03 Aug 2018 14:19:54 +0000 Alison Martin 81667 at http://l.blogs.oxfam http://l.blogs.oxfam/fr/node/81667#comments Making a difference in South Sudan: Ensuring those in need are not forgotten http://l.blogs.oxfam/fr/node/81542 <div class="field field-name-body"><p><strong>Oxfam emergency team leader Cecilia shares her experiences delivering humanitarian aid on the front line in South Sudan. "If we don’t make sacrifices, who will?"</strong></p><p>I’ve seen a lot in my job. As an emergency responder, I am usually close to the front line and the people who have fled from it.</p><p>I have seen people shot as they collect drinking water from a river and people giving every last drop of energy to save others. I saw the country start to climb to its feet after independence in 2011 and I’ve seen it torn apart by conflict since 2013. I’ve seen the best and worst of the people of South Sudan.</p><p><strong>I’ve been doing this job for 8 years</strong> – moving from place to place usually every three months – so I have seen more than most.</p><p>In this conflict, in which everything often seems out of the control of us ordinary citizens, it is a rare feeling to know that you can have large and positive impact. But I have that. I lead a big team of people with even bigger hearts wherever I go: water engineers, latrine builders, health promoters, teacher trainers and community protection specialists.</p><p><strong>Together, we help save lives and keep people going.</strong></p><p><img alt="Women carrying water in buckets that they have collected in Buong, South Sudan. Credit: Tim Bierley/Oxfam" title="Women carrying water in buckets that they have collected in Buong, South Sudan. Credit: Tim Bierley/Oxfam" height="683" width="1240" class="media-element file-default" data-delta="1" typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://l.blogs.oxfam/sites/default/files/111210lpr-buong-women-carry-water-1240.jpg" /></p><p><em>Women carrying water in buckets that they have collected in Buong, South Sudan. Credit: Tim Bierley/Oxfam</em></p><p>We’ve just come back from two remote villages called Buong and Weichjol, where thousands of people arrived after fighting came to their towns last year. When our team arrived, the needs were huge.</p><p><strong>There was no clean running water</strong>, so people were drinking and washing with swamp water. Diseases had spread and with few medical facilities in the town, things were quickly getting worse.</p><p>My team drilled new water points and repaired broken ones. We showed people how to treat and prevent eye infections that were by then endemic in the town – and which would cause blindness if untreated. We helped people pay for their loved ones to travel to a health clinic if their sickness was life-threatening. We trained teachers to make sure all those newly arrived children don’t lose their education as well as their homes.</p><p><strong>We made a difference.</strong></p><p><img alt="Malakal used to be South Sudan’s second largest city, but now resembles a ghost town as thousands of people have fled the violence there. Credit: Bruno Bierrenbach Feder/Oxfam" title="Malakal used to be South Sudan’s second largest city, but now resembles a ghost town as thousands of people have fled the violence there. Credit: Bruno Bierrenbach Feder/Oxfam" height="826" width="1240" class="media-element file-default" data-delta="2" typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://l.blogs.oxfam/sites/default/files/105648lpr-malakal-1240.jpg" /></p><p><em>Malakal used to be South Sudan’s second largest city, but now resembles a ghost town as thousands of people have fled the violence there. Credit: Bruno Bierrenbach Feder/Oxfam</em></p><p><strong>Being there to help my country people can be so rewarding</strong> of course, but this role has also brought some of the worst experiences of my life. In 2014, I was working in a camp in Malakal when heavy fighting broke out in the town. We could not go outside for days because the fighting was so heavy. We just sheltered, unable to reach our food stocks and, worse, unable to help.</p><p>Sometimes I wish we could stay to see the long-term results of our work. but that is the nature of the job. We act quickly and then have to move on.</p><p>There is always another emergency we must respond to.</p><p>Before we go though, I make sure the needs of the people in each place are heard and that the organizations that will continue our work know exactly what they must do.</p><p>We do most of our work in very remote areas – sometimes in the middle of swamps, sometimes between front lines, sometimes virtually out in the bush.</p><p><strong>I see it as my duty to make sure they are not forgotten.</strong></p><p><em>Oxfam and our partners are <a href="https://www.oxfam.org/en/emergencies/hunger-crisis-south-sudan" rel="nofollow">working across South Sudan</a> to provide life-saving clean water and promote awareness of the key ways in which disease can be stopped from spreading.</em></p><p><em>Ongoing projects include drilling and repairing boreholes, digging latrines and training health promoters to lead on disease prevention in their communities, wherever they go. </em></p><p><em>The work of Cecilia’s emergency response team is carried out with the support of European Civil Protection and Humanitarian Aid Operations (<a href="https://ec.europa.eu/echo/" rel="nofollow">ECHO</a>).</em></p><p><em>This entry posted by Cecilia Kiden, on 11 May 2018. Cecilia is a team leader in Oxfam's roving Emergency Preparedness &amp; Response team in South Sudan. Her team travels around South Sudan responding to the most urgent water, sanitation and education needs and helping to keep people safe from disease, malnutrition and violence. She has worked for Oxfam since 2011, starting out as a Public Health Promotion Assistant, before working her way to her current position.</em></p><p><em>Top photo: Cecilia and Gatkuoth work on a borehole repair in Buong camp, South Sudan. Credit: Tim Bierley/Oxfam<br></em></p><p></p></div><div class="field field-name-title"><h2>Making a difference in South Sudan: Ensuring those in need are not forgotten</h2></div> Fri, 11 May 2018 14:29:30 +0000 Guest Blogger 81542 at http://l.blogs.oxfam http://l.blogs.oxfam/fr/node/81542#comments One woman leading the way for healthy mothers in Bangladesh's refugee camps http://l.blogs.oxfam/fr/node/81453 <div class="field field-name-body"><p>Rajiah, 46,&nbsp; fled violence near her home in Myanmar 6 months ago, with her younger daughter, who is 15 years old. She is now living in a refugee camp in Bangladesh with thousand other Rohingya. Rajiah is one of close to a million Rohingya people have fled violence in Myanmar to seek refuge across the border in Bangladesh. This unprecedented number of refugees, of whom more than half are children, has caused a large-scale humanitarian crisis.</p><h3>Women helping women survive and thrive</h3><p>Rajiah has been surrounded by women throughout her life as the eldest of 10 sisters. She herself has 5 daughters, two of which are also in camps living as refugees in Bangladesh with their husbands, while the other two remain in Myanmar. Tragically, Rajiah’s husband disappeared when the violence broke out in Myanmar and Rajiah has no way of knowing where he is. Like so many women in the camp, Rajiah must head up her household alone.</p><p>Oxfam has come to know Rajiah as a leader when she was unanimously selected to represent her community during an Oxfam assessment of what their most pressing needs were. Rajiah is well educated and has been working with and for her community throughout her life. She told us that she delivered some 10,000 babies as a midwife in Myanmar.</p><p>Now, as a refugee in Bangladesh, she is making sure she puts her experience to good use and supports and provides information to the pregnant women in her community. Her name means “Hope” - a true reflection of her personality and life’s work.</p><p><img alt="Rajiah outside her home in the refugee camp on her way to visit her pregnant neighbor in Cox&#039;s Bazar, Bangladesh. Photo: Maruf Hasan/Oxfam" title="Rajiah outside her home in the refugee camp on her way to visit her pregnant neighbor in Cox&#039;s Bazar, Bangladesh. Photo: Maruf Hasan/Oxfam" height="697" width="1240" class="media-element file-default" data-delta="1" typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://l.blogs.oxfam/sites/default/files/rajiah-2.jpg" /></p><p><em>Rajiah outside her home in the refugee camp on her way to visit her pregnant neighbor in Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh. Photo: Maruf Hasan/Oxfam</em></p><h3>Rajiah brings leadership to Cox's Bazar</h3><p>Rajiah was born in a relatively affluent family in Myanmar. Education was an important part of her childhood, and her family made sure all the girls had 8 years of schooling. Rajiah speaks particularly highly of her father, who she says was the greatest influence in her life.</p><p>Rajiah honed her leadership skills from a young age, starting at school as a class leader. Later, organizations who were working in her community, including the UN, selected Rajiah as one of their volunteers. She continued working as a health worker and played a major role in the vaccination process in her area, helping to prevent children dying needlessly from preventable illnesses.</p><p>Rajiah is outspoken and confident, a full believer in women’s role outside the household. That way, she says, women can get knowledge and they can advance – and then other women can also come forward simply by seeing these role models. She is very keen on working and further helping her community, especially the women in her community.</p><p><img alt="Rajiah shares health information with a pregnant woman in her home in Cox&#039;s Bazar, Bangladesh. Photo: Maruf Hasan/Oxfam" title="Rajiah shares health information with a pregnant woman in her home in Cox&#039;s Bazar, Bangladesh. Photo: Maruf Hasan/Oxfam" height="698" width="1240" class="media-element file-default" data-delta="2" typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://l.blogs.oxfam/sites/default/files/rajiah-3.jpg" /></p><p><em>Rajiah shares health information with a pregnant woman in her home in Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh. Photo: Maruf Hasan/Oxfam</em></p><h3>Oxfam is there</h3><p>Oxfam is planning to organize women’s groups in the camps and Rajiah is the ideal person to lead this process in her community. With her leadership skills, kind and warm personality, she will undoubtedly make great progress with the women in the community.</p><p>Oxfam is also currently focusing on providing water and sanitation and adapting to better deal with the crowded conditions and sheer numbers of people. We are drilling wells and installing water points, toilets and showers.</p><p>We’re also helping people stay healthy and hygienic by distributing soap and other essentials and working with community-based volunteers to emphasize the importance of clean water and good hygiene, especially as monsoon season approaches.</p><p><strong>So far, <a href="https://www.oxfam.org/en/emergencies/bangladesh-rohingya-crisis" rel="nofollow">we have reached at least 185,000 people</a>, and hope to reach more than 250,000 in the coming months.&nbsp;</strong></p><p>Your support has been vital in this effort - <strong>thank you</strong>.</p><p><img alt="Rajiah on her rounds, walking through the refugee camp in Cox&#039;s Bazar, Bangladesh. Photo: Maruf Hasan/Oxfam" title="Rajiah on her rounds, walking through the refugee camp in Cox&#039;s Bazar, Bangladesh. Photo: Maruf Hasan/Oxfam" height="697" width="1240" class="media-element file-default" data-delta="3" typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://l.blogs.oxfam/sites/default/files/rajiah-4.jpg" /></p><p><em>Rajiah on her rounds, walking through the refugee camp in Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh. Photo: Maruf Hasan/Oxfam</em></p><p><em>This entry posted by AJM Zobaidur Rahman, Campaigns and Communications Officer, Oxfam in Bangladesh, on 27 March 2018.</em></p><p><em>*Name changed.</em></p><p><em>Top photo: Rajiah, at her home in Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh, is a community health volunteer who helps share health information with pregnant refugee women. Credit: Maruf Hasan/Oxfam</em></p><h3>What you can do now</h3><ul><li><strong>Read the blog: <a href="https://blogs.oxfam.org/en/blogs/17-12-18-we-must-not-fail-rohingya-people-again">We must not fail the Rohingya people again</a> - by Winnie Byanyima, Executive Director, Oxfam International</strong></li><li><strong>Support <a href="https://www.oxfam.org/en/emergencies/bangladesh-rohingya-crisis" rel="nofollow">Oxfam's humanitarian work in Bangladesh</a></strong></li></ul><p></p><p></p><p></p><p></p><p></p></div><div class="field field-name-title"><h2>One woman leading the way for healthy mothers in Bangladesh&#039;s refugee camps</h2></div> Mon, 26 Mar 2018 23:07:39 +0000 Guest Blogger 81453 at http://l.blogs.oxfam http://l.blogs.oxfam/fr/node/81453#comments The people's humanitarians of South Sudan: Saving lives on the front line http://l.blogs.oxfam/fr/node/81449 <div class="field field-name-body"><p><em><strong>Working with local humanitarians in South Sudan, we're saving lives by helping provide clean water and public health promotion.</strong></em></p><p>“Whenever I arrive for work, people always shout ‘This is the man who has come to keep us alive!’” smiles 37-year-old plumber Gatkuoth as he lays down his wrench. Another day’s work is complete; another pump flowing with water.</p><p>One of hundreds of local humanitarians that Oxfam has trained and worked with in the past year, Gatkuoth is from Buong – a sandy scattering of mud and grass houses in the north east of South Sudan. Until last year, his town had managed to avoid the direct grip of the country’s four-year war, but fighting devastated this region in 2017. When shells blasted through nearby towns including Waat and Walgak, 200,000 people abandoned their homes almost overnight. Of those, thousands fled to Buong. Many did not make it. Everyone you meet here lost family or friends in the attacks.</p><p>Even after arriving in Buong though, the threat to life was far from over. As the village population swelled, water pumps began to break down and the risk of disease grew. People were forced to turn to dirty drinking water.</p><p><strong>Calling local humanitarians</strong></p><p>In the days and weeks after the fighting, Oxfam and other agencies raced to find and reach displaced people in scattered and remote locations – including Buong. When we landed in a village close by, we called for support from local humanitarians we’d previously worked with.</p><p>Gatkuoth was one of those who immediately stepped forward to join our engineers and together they got several hand pumps flowing again. With Oxfam’s rapid response team racing against the clock to find and bring water to tens of thousands of people spread across vast plains, our engineers took off quickly once work was complete; but they left Gatkuoth with a healthy supply of spare parts.</p><p>“Today’s repair is my eighteenth since then”, he says wiping his hands down oily blue overalls.</p><p>“I sometimes have to walk for two days [to get to a broken water point],” he says, blowing out his cheeks. “And when you arrive there, the work has not even started, of course.” His is the story of a true people’s humanitarian – and he is joined by dozens more on the front line.</p><p>The next to step up as emergency responders were the public health volunteers. With few latrines for thousands of new arrivals and people forced to drink stagnant rain water when boreholes broke down, fears of cholera spread. Again, we appealed for help and again, dozens of people put their hands up. Many of them had trained as disease prevention specialists in Walgak – before the town was virtually razed to the ground last April.</p><p><strong>Clean water saves lives</strong></p><p><img src="https://blogs.oxfam.org/sites/default/files/thokuang_hygiene-promoter_cholera_south-sudan-1240.jpg" alt=" Tim Bierley/Oxfam" title=" Tim Bierley/Oxfam" data-delta="3" data-fid="10854" data-media-element="1"></p><p><em>Thokuang, Hygiene Promoter for Cholera, South Sudan.</em></p><p>Thokuang, one of the thousands to arrive from Walgak, was one of them.</p><p>“I am trying hard to persuade people to wash their hands at the right time, drink borehole water – or at least boil the swamp water – to save their lives,” she says.</p><p>Watching as Gatkuoth and his team heave a line of dented pipes from the ground and replace them with smooth new ones – one of 12 repairs carried out in Buong - Thokuang said that before this work, “People would either have to queue for up to six hours or get water from the swamp.” Being out of the home for so long often means women, hundreds of whom have been widowed by the conflict, must choose between having clean water, or preparing food for their children. One or the other.&nbsp; Walking home after dark can also bring huge risks to women.</p><p>“Back in Walgak, we had many boreholes, so getting water was easy,” she says.</p><p>But staying had not been an option. “We didn’t just hear the guns in the distance. We saw the faces of the people firing them,” she says, eyes wide.</p><p>Trained workers like Thokuang are central to the health of communities forced to move. Having humanitarians embedded in the community proves vital, especially when fighting takes towns out of reach.</p><p><strong>Conflict all around, the work goes on</strong></p><p>The sound of heavy shelling sometimes rips through the cool night air of Buong, the horizon flashing brightly. The village is 20 kilometers from Waat, where most of those missiles are bound, but the sound is like thunder overhead. Chuol, who is also working as a community hygiene promoter – and visiting Buong today to pick up water treatment tablets – lives just a 40-minute walk from the front line. He trained with Oxfam during calmer times last year, but today his village, which continues to be hit by stray projectiles, has been declared a no-go zone by NGOs.</p><p>“We decided to stay because there was no other place to go,” he adds.</p><p>Is he the last humanitarian worker there? “Well not quite. There are four of us in the team,” he smiles. The workload has become immense as the situation in the village deteriorates. Only two of five waterpoints are still functioning.</p><p>“Some people are drinking water from the swamps. Many of us are suffering from diseases. There have been many cases of diarrhoea and people have been dying. I cannot say exactly how many, but let me say this: people are dying all the time.”</p><p><img src="https://blogs.oxfam.org/sites/default/files/chuol_hygiene-promoter_cholera_south-sudan-1240.jpg" alt=" Tim Bierley/Oxfam" title=" Tim Bierley/Oxfam" data-delta="1" data-fid="10852" data-media-element="1"></p><p><em>Chuol, Oxfam Hygiene Promoter for Cholera, South Sudan.</em></p><p>Chuol spends his weeks going from house-to-house and school-to-school, giving practical advice to keep diseases away. He grits his teeth: “We have seen some good changes in habits, but there is still more to do. We must keep going.”</p><p>He and his team are facing an exceptionally difficult task, but without them, the situation of their people would be even worse.</p><p>Back at the borehole, Gatkuoth is still being thanked by people gathered around the water pump, but he acknowledges that he, Thokuang and Chuol face an overwhelming task: “Maybe I will train all of my children – the boys and the girls – to be pump mechanics if they want to be! I hope they do. I want people to look at them the same way that communities look at me.”</p><p><img src="https://blogs.oxfam.org/sites/default/files/gatkuoth_plumber-portrait_south-sudan-1240.jpg" alt=" Tim Bierley/Oxfam" title=" Tim Bierley/Oxfam" data-delta="2" data-fid="10853" data-media-element="1"></p><p><em>This entry posted by Tim Bierley, Information &amp; Communications Officer, Oxfam in South Sudan, on 22 March 2018. All photos: Tim Bierley/Oxfam.</em></p><p><em><a href="https://www.oxfam.org/en/emergencies/crisis-south-sudan" rel="nofollow">Oxfam and our partners are working across South Sudan</a> to provide life-saving clean water and promote awareness of the key ways in which disease can be stopped from spreading. </em></p><p><em>Ongoing projects include drilling and repairing boreholes, training pump mechanics like Gatkuoth to keep them in shape, digging latrines and training health promoters to lead on disease prevention in their communities, wherever they go. Oxfam's work in Buong is carried out with the support of UK Aid and European Civil Protection and Humanitarian Aid Operations (ECHO).</em></p></div><div class="field field-name-title"><h2>The people&#039;s humanitarians of South Sudan: Saving lives on the front line</h2></div> Thu, 22 Mar 2018 17:02:12 +0000 Tim Bierley 81449 at http://l.blogs.oxfam http://l.blogs.oxfam/fr/node/81449#comments